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1.
Angiology ; : 33197221129351, 2022 Oct 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2064431

ABSTRACT

SARS-Cov-2 has been suggested to promote thrombotic complications and higher mortality. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of SARS-CoV-2 positivity on in-hospital outcome and 30-day mortality in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) enrolled in the International Survey on Acute Coronary Syndromes ST-segment elevation Myocardial Infarction (ISACS-STEMI COVID-19 registry. The 109 SARS-CoV-2 positive patients were compared with 2005 SARS-CoV-2 negative patients. Positive patients were older (P = .002), less often active smokers (P = .002), and hypercholesterolemic (P = .006), they presented more often later than 12 h (P = .037), more often to the hub and were more often in cardiogenic shock (P = .02), or requiring rescue percutaneous coronary intervention after failed thrombolysis (P < .0001). Lower postprocedural Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction 3 flow (P = .029) and more thrombectomy (P = .046) were observed. SARS-CoV-2 was associated with a significantly higher in-hospital mortality (25.7 vs 7%, adjusted Odds Ratio (OR) [95% Confidence Interval] = 3.2 [1.71-5.99], P < .001) in-hospital definite in-stent thrombosis (6.4 vs 1.1%, adjusted Odds Ratio [95% CI] = 6.26 [2.41-16.25], P < .001) and 30-day mortality (34.4 vs 8.5%, adjusted Hazard Ratio [95% CI] = 2.16 [1.45-3.23], P < .001), confirming that SARS-CoV-2 positivity is associated with impaired reperfusion, with negative prognostic consequences.

2.
European journal of internal medicine ; 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1998641

ABSTRACT

Background The characteristics and outcome of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-positive patients with ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI) undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) are still poorly known. Methods The PANDEMIC study was an investigator-initiated, collaborative, individual patient data (IPD) meta-analysis of registry-based studies. MEDLINE, ScienceDirect, Web of Sciences, and SCOPUS were searched to identify all registry-based studies describing the characteristics and outcome of SARS-CoV-2-positive STEMI patients undergoing PPCI. The control group consisted of SARS-CoV-2-negative STEMI patients undergoing PPCI in the same time period from the ISACS-STEMI COVID 19 registry. The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality;the secondary outcome was postprocedural reperfusion assessed by TIMI flow. Results Of 8 registry-based studies identified, IPD were obtained from 6 studies including 941 SARS-CoV-2-positive patients;the control group included 2005 SARS-CoV-2-negative patients. SARS-CoV-2-positive patients showed a significantly higher in-hospital mortality (p < 0.001) and worse postprocedural TIMI flow (<3, p < 0.001) compared with SARS-CoV-2-negative subjects. The increased risk for SARS-CoV-2-positive patients was significantly higher in males compared to females for both the primary (pinteraction = 0.001) and secondary outcome (pinteraction = 0.023). In SARS-CoV-2-positive patients, age ≥ 75 years (OR = 5.72;95%CI: 1.77–18.5), impaired postprocedural TIMI flow (OR = 11.72;95%CI: 2.64–52.10), and cardiogenic shock at presentation (OR = 11.02;95%CI: 2.84–42.80) were independent predictors of mortality. Conclusions In STEMI patients undergoing PPCI, SARS-CoV-2 positivity is independently associated with impaired reperfusion and with a higher risk of in-hospital mortality, especially among male patients. Age ≥ 75 years, cardiogenic shock, and impaired postprocedural TIMI flow independently predict mortality in this high-risk population.

3.
Respir Res ; 23(1): 207, 2022 Aug 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1993363

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is projected to become the third cause of mortality worldwide. COPD shares several pathophysiological mechanisms with cardiovascular disease, especially atherosclerosis. However, no definite answers are available on the prognostic role of COPD in the setting of ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), especially during COVID-19 pandemic, among patients undergoing primary angioplasty, that is therefore the aim of the current study. METHODS: In the ISACS-STEMI COVID-19 registry we included retrospectively patients with STEMI treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) between March and June of 2019 and 2020 from 109 high-volume primary PCI centers in 4 continents. RESULTS: A total of 15,686 patients were included in this analysis. Of them, 810 (5.2%) subjects had a COPD diagnosis. They were more often elderly and with a more pronounced cardiovascular risk profile. No preminent procedural dissimilarities were noticed except for a lower proportion of dual antiplatelet therapy at discharge among COPD patients (98.9% vs. 98.1%, P = 0.038). With regards to short-term fatal outcomes, both in-hospital and 30-days mortality occurred more frequently among COPD patients, similarly in pre-COVID-19 and COVID-19 era. However, after adjustment for main baseline differences, COPD did not result as independent predictor for in-hospital death (adjusted OR [95% CI] = 0.913[0.658-1.266], P = 0.585) nor for 30-days mortality (adjusted OR [95% CI] = 0.850 [0.620-1.164], P = 0.310). No significant differences were detected in terms of SARS-CoV-2 positivity between the two groups. CONCLUSION: This is one of the largest studies investigating characteristics and outcome of COPD patients with STEMI undergoing primary angioplasty, especially during COVID pandemic. COPD was associated with significantly higher rates of in-hospital and 30-days mortality. However, this association disappeared after adjustment for baseline characteristics. Furthermore, COPD did not significantly affect SARS-CoV-2 positivity. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04412655 (2nd June 2020).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Pandemics , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/diagnosis , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/epidemiology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/therapy , Registries , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Treatment Outcome
6.
Int J Qual Health Care ; 34(2)2022 May 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1596862

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Incident reporting (IR) is one of the most used systems to gain knowledge of adverse events (AEs) and to identify sources of risk. During COVID-19 pandemic, several organizational changes have been implemented to respond adequately and effectively to the emergency; this required the suspension of most deferrable activities. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to investigate whether IR attitude of health workers has been reduced during the pandemic event. METHOD: A retrospective analysis was conducted at the Azienda Ospedale - Università di Padova (Italy), considering IR of years 2019 and 2020. To standardize the effects of the decrease in admissions, we considered the number of incidents per 1000 admissions. RESULTS: Data shows that during the first (March-May 2020) and second waves (October-December 2020) of the COVID-19 pandemic there was a statistically significant reduction in the rate of IR for every 1000 admissions (P = 0.001-Wilcoxon test), especially for AEs and in COVID-19 units. CONCLUSION: This study shows a reduction in IR especially during the first and second pandemic waves of COVID-19 in year 2020. Education and training interventions could be fundamental to raise awareness of the importance of IR in health workers, as this could provide opportunities to understand what is impacting on safety in a particular healthcare context and enable continuous improvement.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Risk Management , Tertiary Care Centers
7.
Historic Environment: Policy & Practice ; : 1-18, 2021.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1545836

ABSTRACT

Before the COVID-19 pandemic in early 2020, mass tourism was the main driver for the unusual growth of tourist accommodations in World Heritage Cities (WHC). This paper investigates how the mass tourism pause due to the pandemic can be considered an opportunity for resetting cultural heritage policy and management practice in WHC. Selecting the Historic Centers of Siena and Florence as the case studies, we explain how the two cities experienced an unusual increase in tourist accommodation before the pandemic. By reviewing scenarios for the COVID-19 virus outbreak in Italy, we argue insights for a new cultural heritage policy and management framework that can effectively moderate mass tourism in WHC. Our findings suggest the new policies should be initiated based on a multi-sectoral and multi-level approaches in planning practice. By creating a dynamic tourism map on the macro level, international cultural heritage and tourism organisations may agree on policies that mitigate tourist flows in vulnerable WHC. On the micro-level, there is a demand for regional directives that monitor the growth of tourist accommodations in WHC. Furthermore, local communities’ engagement in decision-making may open new opportunities to work more collaboratively on the social or environmental challenges that exist in WHC. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Historic Environment: Policy & Practice is the property of Taylor & Francis Ltd and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

8.
Open Med (Wars) ; 16(1): 1696-1704, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511850

ABSTRACT

The spread of the COVID-19 disease substantially influenced the International Healthcare system, and the national governments worldwide had before long to decide how to manage the available resources, giving priority to the treatment of the COVID-infected patients. Then, in many countries, it was decided to limit the elective procedures to surgical oncology and emergency procedures. In fact, most of the routine, middle-low complexity surgical interventions were reduced, and the day surgery (DS) activities were almost totally interrupted. As a result of this approach, the waiting list of these patients has significantly increased. In the current phase, with a significant decrease in the incidence of COVID-19 cases, the surgical daily activity can be safely and effectively restarted. Adjustments are mandatory to resume the DS activity. The whole separation of pathways with respect to the long-stay and emergency surgery, an accurate preoperative protocol of patient management, with a proper selection and screening of all-day cases, careful scheduling of surgical organization in the operating room, and planning of the postoperative pathway are the goals for a feasible, safe, and effective resumption of DS activity.

9.
Heart ; 108(6): 458-466, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1495503

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The initial data of the International Study on Acute Coronary Syndromes - ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction COVID-19 showed in Europe a remarkable reduction in primary percutaneous coronary intervention procedures and higher in-hospital mortality during the initial phase of the pandemic as compared with the prepandemic period. The aim of the current study was to provide the final results of the registry, subsequently extended outside Europe with a larger inclusion period (up to June 2020) and longer follow-up (up to 30 days). METHODS: This is a retrospective multicentre registry in 109 high-volume primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) centres from Europe, Latin America, South-East Asia and North Africa, enrolling 16 674 patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing PPPCI in March/June 2019 and 2020. The main study outcomes were the incidence of PPCI, delayed treatment (ischaemia time >12 hours and door-to-balloon >30 min), in-hospital and 30-day mortality. RESULTS: In 2020, during the pandemic, there was a significant reduction in PPCI as compared with 2019 (incidence rate ratio 0.843, 95% CI 0.825 to 0.861, p<0.0001). This reduction was significantly associated with age, being higher in older adults (>75 years) (p=0.015), and was not related to the peak of cases or deaths due to COVID-19. The heterogeneity among centres was high (p<0.001). Furthermore, the pandemic was associated with a significant increase in door-to-balloon time (40 (25-70) min vs 40 (25-64) min, p=0.01) and total ischaemia time (225 (135-410) min vs 196 (120-355) min, p<0.001), which may have contributed to the higher in-hospital (6.5% vs 5.3%, p<0.001) and 30-day (8% vs 6.5%, p=0.001) mortality observed during the pandemic. CONCLUSION: Percutaneous revascularisation for STEMI was significantly affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, with a 16% reduction in PPCI procedures, especially among older patients (about 20%), and longer delays to treatment, which may have contributed to the increased in-hospital and 30-day mortality during the pandemic. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04412655.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiologists/trends , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/trends , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Aged , Female , Hospital Mortality/trends , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/mortality , Registries , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/mortality , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
10.
Diabet Epidemiol Manag ; 4: 100022, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1487683

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, concerns have been arisen on the use of renin-angiotensin system inhibitors (RASI) due to the potentially increased expression of Angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE)2 and patient's susceptibility to SARS-CoV2 infection. Diabetes mellitus have been recognized favoring the coronavirus infection with consequent increase mortality in COVID-19. No data have been so far reported in diabetic patients suffering from ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), a very high-risk population deserving of RASI treatment. METHODS: The ISACS-STEMI COVID-19 registry retrospectively assessed STEMI patients treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) in March/June 2019 and 2020 in 109 European high-volume primary PCI centers. This subanalysis assessed the prognostic impact of chronic RASI therapy at admission on mortality and SARS-CoV2 infection among diabetic patients. RESULTS: Our population is represented by 3812 diabetic STEMI patients undergoing mechanical reperfusion, 2038 in 2019 and 1774 in 2020. Among 3761 patients with available data on chronic RASI therapy, between those ones with and without treatment there were several differences in baseline characteristics, (similar in both periods) but no difference in the prevalence of SARS-CoV2 infection (1.6% vs 1.3%, respectively, p = 0.786). Considering in-hospital medication, RASI therapy was overall associated with a significantly lower in-hospital mortality (3.3% vs 15.8%, p < 0.0001), consistently both in 2019 and in 2010. CONCLUSIONS: This is first study to investigate the impact of RASI therapy on prognosis and SARS-CoV2 infection of diabetic patients experiencing STEMI and undergoing PPCI during the COVID-19 pandemic. Both pre-admission chronic RASI therapy and in-hospital RASI did not negatively affected patients' survival during the hospitalization, neither increased the risk of SARS-CoV2 infection. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04412655.

12.
Heart Vessels ; 35(10): 1349-1359, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1451965

ABSTRACT

Fractional flow reserve (FFR) assessed during adenosine-induced maximal hyperemia has emerged as a useful tool for the guidance of percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). However, interindividual variability in the response to adenosine has been claimed as a major limitation to the use of adenosine for the measurement of FFR, carrying the risk of underestimating the severity of coronary stenoses, with potential negative prognostic consequences. Genetic variants of the adenosine receptor A2a (ADORA2A gene), located in the coronary circulation, have been involved in the modulation of the hyperemic response to adenosine. However, no study has so far evaluated the impact of the single nucleotide polymorphism rs5751876 of ADORA2A on the measurement of FFR in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention that was, therefore, the aim of our study. We included patients undergoing coronary angiography and FFR assessment for intermediate (40-70%) coronary lesions. FFR measurement was performed by pressure-recording guidewire (Prime Wire, Volcano), after induction of hyperemia with intracoronary boli of adenosine (from 60 to 1440 µg, with dose doubling at each step). Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis was performed to assess the presence of rs5751876 C>T polymorphism of ADORA2a receptor. We included 204 patients undergoing FFR measurement of 231 coronary lesions. A total of 134 patients carried the polymorphism (T allele), of whom 41 (30.6%) in homozygosis (T/T).Main clinical and angiographic features did not differ according to ADORA2A genotype. The rs5751876 C>T polymorphism did not affect mean FFR values (p = 0.91), the percentage of positive FFR (p = 0.54) and the duration of maximal hyperemia. However, the time to recovery to baseline FFR values was more prolonged among the T-allele carriers as compared to wild-type patients (p = 0.04). Based on these results, in patients with intermediate coronary stenoses undergoing FFR assessment with adenosine, the polymorphism rs5751876 of ADORA2A does not affect the peak hyperemic response to adenosine and the results of FFR. However, a more prolonged effect of adenosine was observed in T-carriers.


Subject(s)
Coronary Artery Disease/genetics , Coronary Stenosis/genetics , Fractional Flow Reserve, Myocardial/genetics , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Receptor, Adenosine A2A/genetics , Adenosine/administration & dosage , Aged , Cardiac Catheterization , Coronary Angiography , Coronary Artery Disease/diagnosis , Coronary Artery Disease/physiopathology , Coronary Artery Disease/therapy , Coronary Stenosis/diagnosis , Coronary Stenosis/physiopathology , Coronary Stenosis/therapy , Female , Humans , Hyperemia/physiopathology , Male , Middle Aged , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , Phenotype , Predictive Value of Tests , Severity of Illness Index , Vasodilator Agents/administration & dosage
13.
Cardiovasc Res ; 117(14): 2705-2729, 2021 12 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1411978

ABSTRACT

The cardiovascular system is significantly affected in coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19). Microvascular injury, endothelial dysfunction, and thrombosis resulting from viral infection or indirectly related to the intense systemic inflammatory and immune responses are characteristic features of severe COVID-19. Pre-existing cardiovascular disease and viral load are linked to myocardial injury and worse outcomes. The vascular response to cytokine production and the interaction between severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 receptor may lead to a significant reduction in cardiac contractility and subsequent myocardial dysfunction. In addition, a considerable proportion of patients who have been infected with SARS-CoV-2 do not fully recover and continue to experience a large number of symptoms and post-acute complications in the absence of a detectable viral infection. This conditions often referred to as 'post-acute COVID-19' may have multiple causes. Viral reservoirs or lingering fragments of viral RNA or proteins contribute to the condition. Systemic inflammatory response to COVID-19 has the potential to increase myocardial fibrosis which in turn may impair cardiac remodelling. Here, we summarize the current knowledge of cardiovascular injury and post-acute sequelae of COVID-19. As the pandemic continues and new variants emerge, we can advance our knowledge of the underlying mechanisms only by integrating our understanding of the pathophysiology with the corresponding clinical findings. Identification of new biomarkers of cardiovascular complications, and development of effective treatments for COVID-19 infection are of crucial importance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/virology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/enzymology , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Cardiometabolic Risk Factors , Cardiovascular Diseases/enzymology , Cardiovascular Diseases/physiopathology , Clinical Trials as Topic , Humans , Inflammation/complications , Inflammation/virology , Microcirculation , Sex Characteristics
14.
Oxid Med Cell Longev ; 2021: 4936571, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394269

ABSTRACT

Acute coronary syndromes (ACS) are frequently reported in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and may impact patient clinical course and mortality. Although the underlying pathogenesis remains unclear, several potential mechanisms have been hypothesized, including oxygen supply/demand imbalance, direct viral cellular damage, systemic inflammatory response with cytokine-mediated injury, microvascular thrombosis, and endothelial dysfunction. The severe hypoxic state, combined with other conditions frequently reported in COVID-19, namely sepsis, tachyarrhythmias, anemia, hypotension, and shock, can induce a myocardial damage due to the mismatch between oxygen supply and demand and results in type 2 myocardial infarction (MI). In addition, COVID-19 promotes atherosclerotic plaque instability and thrombus formation and may precipitate type 1 MI. Patients with severe disease often show decrease in platelets count, higher levels of d-dimer, ultralarge von Willebrand factor multimers, tissue factor, and prolongation of prothrombin time, which reflects a prothrombotic state. An endothelial dysfunction has been described as a consequence of the direct viral effects and of the hyperinflammatory environment. The expression of tissue factor, von Willebrand factor, thromboxane, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 promotes the prothrombotic status. In addition, endothelial cells generate superoxide anions, with enhanced local oxidative stress, and endothelin-1, which affects the vasodilator/vasoconstrictor balance and platelet aggregation. The optimal management of COVID-19 patients is a challenge both for logistic and clinical reasons. A deeper understanding of ACS pathophysiology may yield novel research insights and therapeutic perspectives in higher cardiovascular risk subjects with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Acute Coronary Syndrome/physiopathology , Acute Coronary Syndrome/virology , COVID-19/complications , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 9(8)2021 Aug 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1341743

ABSTRACT

Vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 will likely be the most promising way to combat the pandemic. Even if mass vaccination is urgent, it should still always be supported by appropriate patient safety management. The aim of this study, based on failure mode, effects and criticality analysis (FMECA), was to identify possible failures and highlight measures that can be adopted to prevent their occurrence. A team of resident doctors in public health from the University of Padua and specialists in risk analysis in public health examined the mass vaccination process. A diagram was drafted to illustrate the various phases of mass vaccination, analyze the process, and identify all failure modes. Criticalities were ascertained by rating the severity, frequency and likelihood of failure detection on a scale of 1 to 10. We identified a total of 71 possible faults distributed over the various phases of the process, and 34 of them were classified as carrying a high risk. For the potentially high-risk failure modes, we identified 63 recommended actions to contain the cause of their occurrence or improve their detection. For the purpose of detecting potential failures, FMECA can be successfully applied to mass vaccination, which should be considered a high-risk process.

16.
Atherosclerosis ; 332: 48-54, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1321994

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: SARS-Cov-2 predisposes patients to thrombotic complications, due to excessive inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, platelet activation, and coagulation/fibrinolysis disturbances. The aim of the present study was to evaluate clinical characteristics and prognostic impact of SARS-CoV-2 positivity among STEMI patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI). METHODS: We selected SARS-CoV-2 positive patients included in the ISACS-STEMI COVID-19, a retrospective multicenter European registry including 6609 STEMI patients treated with PPCI from March 1st until April 30th, in 2019 and 2020. As a reference group, we randomly sampled 5 SARS-Cov-2 negative patients per each SARS-CoV-2 positive patient, individually matched for age, sex, and hospital/geographic area. Study endpoints were in-hospital mortality, definite stent thrombosis, heart failure. RESULTS: Our population is represented by 62 positive SARS-CoV-2 positive patients who were compared with a matched population of 310 STEMI patients. No significant difference was observed in baseline characteristics or the modality of access to the PCI center. In the SARS-CoV-2 positive patients, the culprit lesion was more often located in the RCA (p < 0.001). Despite similar pre and postprocedural TIMI flow, we observed a trend in higher use of GP IIb-IIIa inhibitors and a significantly higher use of thrombectomy in the SARS-CoV-2 positive patients. SARS-CoV-2 positivity was associated with a remarkably higher in hospital mortality (29% vs 5.5%, p < 0.001), definite in-stent thrombosis (8.1% vs 1.6%, p = 0.004) and heart failure (22.6% vs 10.6%, p = 0.001) that was confirmed after adjustment for confounding factors. CONCLUSIONS: Our study showed that among STEMI patients, SARS-CoV-2 positivity is associated with larger thrombus burden, a remarkably higher mortality but also higher rates of in-stent thrombosis and heart failure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Humans , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , Registries , Reperfusion , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/surgery , Treatment Outcome
18.
Biomed Pharmacother ; 138: 111469, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1135260

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Concerns have been raised on a potential interaction between renin-angiotensin system inhibitors (RASI) and the susceptibility to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). No data have been so far reported on the prognostic impact of RASI in patients suffering from ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) during COVID-19 pandemic, which was the aim of the present study. METHODS: STEMI patients treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) and enrolled in the ISACS-STEMI COVID-19 registry were included in the present sub-analysis and divided according to RASI therapy at admission. RESULTS: Our population is represented by 6095 patients, of whom 3654 admitted in 2019 and 2441 in 2020. No difference in the prevalence of SARSCoV2 infection was observed according to RASI therapy at admission (2.5% vs 2.1%, p = 0.5), which was associated with a significantly lower mortality (adjusted OR [95% CI]=0.68 [0.51-0.90], P = 0.006), confirmed in the analysis restricted to 2020 (adjusted OR [95% CI]=0.5[0.33-0.74], P = 0.001). Among the 5388 patients in whom data on in-hospital medication were available, in-hospital RASI therapy was associated with a significantly lower mortality (2.1% vs 16.7%, OR [95% CI]=0.11 [0.084-0.14], p < 0.0001), confirmed after adjustment in both periods. Among the 62 SARSCoV-2 positive patients, RASI therapy, both at admission or in-hospital, showed no prognostic effect. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to investigate the impact of RASI therapy on the prognosis and SARSCoV2 infection of STEMI patients undergoing PPCI during the COVID-19 pandemic. Both pre-admission and in-hospital RASI were associated with lower mortality. Among SARSCoV2-positive patients, both chronic and in-hospital RASI therapy showed no impact on survival.


Subject(s)
Antihypertensive Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/mortality , Myocardial Reperfusion , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/mortality , Aged , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , Prognosis , Registries , Renin-Angiotensin System , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy
19.
BMC Cardiovasc Disord ; 21(1): 23, 2021 01 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1059712

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors including age, male sex, hypertension, diabetes, and tobacco use, has been reported in patients with Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) who experienced adverse outcome. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between cardiovascular risk factors and in-hospital mortality in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: MEDLINE, Cochrane, Web of Sciences, and SCOPUS were searched for retrospective or prospective observational studies reporting data on cardiovascular risk factors and in-hospital mortality in patients with COVID-19. Univariable and multivariable age-adjusted analyses were conducted to evaluate the association between cardiovascular risk factors and the occurrence of in-hospital death. RESULTS: The analysis included 45 studies enrolling 18,300 patients. The pooled estimate of in-hospital mortality was 12% (95% CI 9-15%). The univariable meta-regression analysis showed a significant association between age (coefficient: 1.06; 95% CI 1.04-1.09; p < 0.001), diabetes (coefficient: 1.04; 95% CI 1.02-1.07; p < 0.001) and hypertension (coefficient: 1.01; 95% CI 1.01-1.03; p = 0.013) with in-hospital death. Male sex and smoking did not significantly affect mortality. At multivariable age-adjusted meta-regression analysis, diabetes was significantly associated with in-hospital mortality (coefficient: 1.02; 95% CI 1.01-1.05; p = 0.043); conversely, hypertension was no longer significant after adjustment for age (coefficient: 1.00; 95% CI 0.99-1.01; p = 0.820). A significant association between age and in-hospital mortality was confirmed in all multivariable models. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis suggests that older age and diabetes are associated with higher risk of in-hospital mortality in patients infected by SARS-CoV-2. Conversely, male sex, hypertension, and smoking did not independently correlate with fatal outcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Hospital Mortality , SARS-CoV-2 , Age Factors , Analysis of Variance , Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology , Diabetes Mellitus/mortality , Female , Humans , Hypertension/mortality , Male , Observational Studies as Topic , Publication Bias , Regression Analysis , Risk Factors , Sex Factors , Smoking/mortality
20.
Sustainability ; 13(1):174, 2021.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-984825

ABSTRACT

In recent years, finding affordable housing has been a notable challenge for the residents of historic cities in Europe. This paper aims to develop a novel vision for improving housing policies in the post-COVID time to moderate the long-lasting issue of affordable housing in historic cities. The research was developed based on the findings of the Atlas World Heritage in 2019. In this project, five European Art Cities, namely Florence, Edinburgh, Bordeaux, Porto, and Santiago de Compostela, discussed their common management challenges through the shared learning method. Focusing on the case study of Florence and using a mixed-method, we collected data through the municipality of Florence, map analysis, and distribution of a questionnaire among the city residents. Then, we used inductive reasoning to explain how reforming housing policies in the post-COVID time could moderate the long-lasting issue of affordable housing in historic cities. The findings suggest that housing policies need to be supported simultaneously at both international and local levels. From the international perspective, associated cultural heritage organizations, like United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and its advisory bodies and the World Tourism Organization (UNWTO), need to develop restriction policies that manage tourism flows in historic cities like increasing the airline taxation. At the local level, Florence needs decisive housing policies that ban the growth of illegal tourist accommodation in the city. However, the privilege of establishing new hotels can be awarded in suburban or rural areas to support sustainable tourism goals.

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