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1.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(6)2021 Jun 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1280406

ABSTRACT

In this report, we describe a patient who developed an acute trigeminal neuritis and cervical radiculitis after receiving a Pfizer-BioNtech vaccination (tozinameran) against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neuritis , Radiculopathy , Humans , Radiculopathy/chemically induced , Radiculopathy/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/adverse effects
3.
Annals Academy of Medicine Singapore ; 49(8):538-542, 2020.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-911335

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak is affecting hospital admissions of stroke patients. This, in turn, will reduce the use of proven stroke treatments, which will result in poorer stroke outcomes. We examined local stroke admissions before, during, and after the 2003 outbreak of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) (these periods being defined in both the Singapore and worldwide contexts), to extrapolate stroke admission patterns in Singapore during the current COVED-19 crisis. Materials and Methods: National inpatient admission data from the Ministry of Health (MOH), Singapore, and death data from the Registry of Births and Deaths (RBD), Singapore, were analysed. Trends of local stroke admissions and stroke-related mortality pre-SARS, during SARS, and post-SARS periods, both in the Singapore and worldwide contexts, were analysed using time series plot in monthly time units. Differences between periods were presented as percentage change between: (1) SARS and pre-SARS periods, and (2) post-SARS and SARS periods and compared using two-sample t-tests. Results: There was a 19% decline in stroke admissions into all local hospitals during the Singapore SARS period (P = 0.002) and a 13% reduction during the worldwide SARS period (P = 0.006). Stroke admissions increased by 18% after the Singapore SARS period was over (P = 0.003) and rose by a further 8% when the worldwide SARS period ended (P = 0.046). Stroke-related mortality remained stable throughout. Conclusions: During the SARS pandemic, there was a reduction in the number of stroke admissions, and this was apparent during both the local SARS and worldwide SARS outbreak periods. We should take appropriate steps through public education to minimise the expected reduced stroke admissions during the COVED-19 pandemic, inferred from the findings during the SARS pandemic.

4.
J Neurol Sci ; 418: 117118, 2020 Nov 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-741365

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To describe the spectrum of COVID-19 neurology in Singapore. METHOD: We prospectively studied all microbiologically-confirmed COVID-19 patients in Singapore, who were referred for any neurological complaint within three months of COVID-19 onset. Neurological diagnoses and relationship to COVID-19 was made by consensus guided by contemporaneous literature, refined using recent case definitions. RESULTS: 47,572 patients (median age 34 years, 98% males) were diagnosed with COVID-19 in Singapore between 19 March to 19 July 2020. We identified 90 patients (median age 38, 98.9% males) with neurological disorders; 39 with varying certainty of relationship to COVID-19 categorised as: i) Central nervous system syndromes-4 acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) and encephalitis, ii) Cerebrovascular disorders-19 acute ischaemic stroke and transient ischaemic attack (AIS/TIA), 4 cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), 2 intracerebral haemorrhage, iii) Peripheral nervous system-7 mono/polyneuropathies, and a novel group, iv) Autonomic nervous system-4 limited dysautonomic syndromes. Fifty-one other patients had pre/co-existent neurological conditions unrelated to COVID-19. Encephalitis/ADEM is delayed, occurring in critical COVID-19, while CVT and dysautonomia occurred relatively early, and largely in mild infections. AIS/TIA was variable in onset, occurring in patients with differing COVID-19 severity; remarkably 63.2% were asymptomatic. CVT was more frequent than expected and occurred in mild/asymptomatic patients. There were no neurological complications in all 81 paediatric COVID-19 cases. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 neurology has a wide spectrum of dysimmune-thrombotic disorders. We encountered relatively few neurological complications, probably because our outbreak involved largely young men with mild/asymptomatic COVID-19. It is also widely perceived that the pandemic did not unduly affect the Singapore healthcare system.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Nervous System Diseases/epidemiology , Adult , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Singapore/epidemiology , Young Adult
5.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 29(9): 105009, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-548354

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Acute stroke unit (ASU) care is proven to reduce mortality and morbidity. During the COVID-19 crisis, established physical units and care practices within existing physical units are likely to be disrupted. Stroke patients with possible suspected COVID-19 infection may be isolated in other wards outside the ASU. METHODS: Our hospital developed an adapted ASU protocol which includes key elements for stroke unit care, can be utilized by staff not familiar with stroke care with minimal training and can be implemented in various settings. RESULTS: The adapted protocol has 3 categories of Acute monitoring (neurological observations, blood pressure and input-output monitoring, investigations and specific post-reperfusion issues), Stroke complications (focusing on 5 common complications) and Unified team (describing daily check-ins, patient education, communication, discharge planning and post-discharge support). CONCLUSIONS: Details are presented in the article in a format that it can be adopted by other centers facing similar issues in order to ensure ASU care is not compromised.


Subject(s)
Clinical Protocols , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated/organization & administration , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Stroke/therapy , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Occupational Health , Pandemics , Patient Safety , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Program Development , Program Evaluation , Risk Factors , Singapore , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/physiopathology
6.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 29(9): 104938, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-210006

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-Cov-2), now named coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), may change the risk of stroke through an enhanced systemic inflammatory response, hypercoagulable state, and endothelial damage in the cerebrovascular system. Moreover, due to the current pandemic, some countries have prioritized health resources towards COVID-19 management, making it more challenging to appropriately care for other potentially disabling and fatal diseases such as stroke. The aim of this study is to identify and describe changes in stroke epidemiological trends before, during, and after the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This is an international, multicenter, hospital-based study on stroke incidence and outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic. We will describe patterns in stroke management, stroke hospitalization rate, and stroke severity, subtype (ischemic/hemorrhagic), and outcomes (including in-hospital mortality) in 2020 during COVID-19 pandemic, comparing them with the corresponding data from 2018 and 2019, and subsequently 2021. We will also use an interrupted time series (ITS) analysis to assess the change in stroke hospitalization rates before, during, and after COVID-19, in each participating center. CONCLUSION: The proposed study will potentially enable us to better understand the changes in stroke care protocols, differential hospitalization rate, and severity of stroke, as it pertains to the COVID-19 pandemic. Ultimately, this will help guide clinical-based policies surrounding COVID-19 and other similar global pandemics to ensure that management of cerebrovascular comorbidity is appropriately prioritized during the global crisis. It will also guide public health guidelines for at-risk populations to reduce risks of complications from such comorbidities.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Hospitalization/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/therapy , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Healthcare Disparities/trends , Hospital Mortality/trends , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Incidence , Interrupted Time Series Analysis , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prospective Studies , Registries , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/mortality , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
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