Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 6 de 6
Filter
1.
Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice ; 163:148-164, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1937252

ABSTRACT

This study is the first to empirically analyze motivations for taking undirected travel (UT) trips, or travel without a destination (as opposed to derived trips) undertaken for the purpose of the trip itself, as the determinants and characteristics are largely unknown. The overall research objective is to explore UT motivations in terms of demographics and trip characteristics, such as mode, frequency, distance, and duration, using survey data from Flanders, Belgium during the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown (18 March – 4 May 2020). First, a factor analysis identifies four main motivations for UT: 1. Improving Health and Well-Being, 2. Removing Negative Feelings, 3. Enjoying Scenery, and 4. Out-of-Home Socializing. Following, differences in UT motivations across groups are analyzed with mean-comparisons of demographic characteristics, trip characteristics, and attitude and well-being measurements. Findings suggest a clear relationship between UT and physical/mental health. There are stronger motivations for active than motorized UT trips, and stronger motivations associated with use of multiple modes. Longer (distance and duration) and more frequent UT trips increasingly fulfill all motivations. This research provides more evidence for the idea that travel is not always a derived demand for which less is always better, or an ancillary event to other activities, and can offer baseline empirical information on UT from which future studies can grow as well as contribute information about the value of travel.

2.
Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment ; 99:103018, 2021.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1373285

ABSTRACT

Despite having the potential to improve subjective well-being, satisfaction with undirected travel, or travel for its own sake (e.g. taking a walk, bike ride, or joy ride), has not yet been empirically investigated. Using mean-comparison and generalized linear regression models, this study analyzes 1579 undirected trips made by 852 respondents to a survey in Flanders, Belgium during the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown (18 March – 4 May 2020). Undirected travel was found to be longer in duration and more satisfying than results from directed trips in previous literature, with an indication that higher levels of physical activity are important to satisfaction. Undirected travel satisfaction was found to have a clear positive relationship to well-being. As these trips are often active and were found to imply a positive utility of travel, understanding them can be important to policy goals regarding health, sustainability, and improving individual well-being.

3.
Transp Res Interdiscip Perspect ; 11: 100450, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1364500

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 crisis, a series of measures were taken to restrict travel and social activities outside the home in order to curb the pandemic and ameliorate its negative effects. These unprecedented measures have had a profound impact on the number and purposes of trips and modes of travel. In China, although the pandemic is now generally under control and transport availability has returned to nearly normal, the extent of the changes in travel behaviour wrought during and after the pandemic still remains unclear. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to investigate the differences in individual travel behaviours during and after the COVID-19 pandemic, using Huzhou as an example. Semi-structured interviews were used to examine the influence of COVID-19 on the travel behaviour and perceptions of different groups. The results indicate that, initially, travel demand was greatly reduced. Second, decreased travel reduced participation in activities, which can have adverse effects on people's health as well as their subjective well-being. Third, the degree and duration of such impacts varied from person to person. Students, lower income cohorts, groups living in small communities with insufficient green spaces, and those working in tourism, catering, informal businesses and transport-related sectors were more vulnerable than others. Policymakers, urban and transport planners should therefore pay attention to the social inequities that arise from unequal access to transport and heterogeneity between individuals. Additionally, public transport systems require further development to promote social cohesion.

4.
Transportation Letters ; : 1-7, 2021.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1142595

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic lockdown undeniably impacted travel behavior. It is assumed that directed (commute and non-work) trips reduced following reduced out-of-home activities. This study analyzing 764 respondents in Flanders, Belgium, explores whether undirected trips, or travel for the purpose of travel itself, increase as compensation or to ‘get out and about’. Additionally, change in commute and non-work trip mode and frequency is analyzed to assess whether a shift from public to private transport modes and from motorized to active modes occurred. The effect of urbanization on travel behavior change was also evaluated. Results did not indicate a shift from public to private transport modes, suggesting a general decrease in directed trips, but indicated compensation for decreased car use with both undirected and active trips. The built environment was not significantly related to changes in travel behavior, suggesting that respondents participated in compensatory behavior during the lockdown regardless of residential urbanization. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Transportation Letters is the property of Taylor & Francis Ltd and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

5.
Journal of Transport & Health ; : 100973, 2020.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-933309

ABSTRACT

This introduction to the special issue on travel, health and well-being is subdivided into three parts. In Section 1 we provide a summary of existing literature analysing how health and well-being are related with transport and travel behaviour. An overview and short descriptions of the studies included in this special issue are given in Section 2. In Section 3 we conclude this editorial by uncovering research gaps and suggesting avenues for further research.

6.
Transp Res Interdiscip Perspect ; 5: 100121, 2020 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-116766

ABSTRACT

The spread of the COVID-19 virus has resulted in unprecedented measures restricting travel and activity participation in many countries. Social distancing, i.e., reducing interactions between individuals in order to slow down the spread of the virus, has become the new norm. In this viewpoint I will discuss the potential implications of social distancing on daily travel patterns. Avoiding social contact might completely change the number and types of out-of-home activities people perform, and how people reach these activities. It can be expected that the demand for travel will reduce and that people will travel less by public transport. Social distancing might negatively affect subjective well-being and health status, as it might result in social isolation and limited physical activity. As a result, walking and cycling, recreationally or utilitarian, can be important ways to maintain satisfactory levels of health and well-being. Policymakers and planners should consequently try to encourage active travel, while public transport operators should focus on creating ways to safely use public transport.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL