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1.
Nurs Open ; 2023 May 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20243665

ABSTRACT

AIM: To evaluate healthcare provider awareness and uptake of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) billing for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) prevention counselling and the delivery of prevention counselling to patients awaiting severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 test results. DESIGN: Cross sectional survey of US-based healthcare providers in February 2021. METHODS: Analysis of associations with healthcare provider-reported awareness of CMS prevention counselling guidance and billing with provider type, specialty, and work setting. RESULTS: A total of 1919 healthcare providers responded to the survey. Overall, 38% (726/1919) of providers reported awareness of available CMS reimbursement for COVID-19 patient counselling and 29% (465/1614) of CMS billing-eligible providers reported billing for this counselling. Among physicians, those aware of CMS guidance were significantly more likely to bill (58%) versus those unaware (10%). Among RNSights respondents eligible for CMS billing (n = 114), 31% of those aware of the guidance reported billing as compared to 0% of those not aware.

2.
Clin Infect Dis ; 2023 Mar 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2310189

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Public health programs varied in ability to reach people with COVID-19 and their contacts to encourage separation from others. For both adult cases of COVID-19 and contacts, we estimated the impact of contact tracing activities on separation behaviors from January, 2020 until March, 2022. METHODS: We used a probability-based panel survey of a nationally representative sample to gather data for estimates and comparisons. RESULTS: An estimated 64,255,351 adults reported a positive SARS-CoV-2 test result; 79.6% isolated for >5 days, 60.2% isolated for >10 days, and 79.2% self-notified contacts. 24,057,139 (37.7%) completed a case investigation and 46.2% reported contacts to health officials. More adults who completed a case investigation isolated than adults who did not (>5 days, 82.6%; >10 days, 69.8% versus >5 days, 78.2% and >10 days 54.8%; p-values for both measures <0.05).84,946,636 adults were a contact to a COVID-19 case; 73.1% learned of their exposure directly from a case; 49.4% quarantined for >5 days, 18.7% quarantined for >14 days, and 13.5% completed a contact tracing call. More who completed a contact tracing call quarantined than those who did not (>5 days, 61.2%; >14 days, 25.2% versus >5 days, 48.5%; >14 days, 18.0%; p-values for both measures <0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Engagement in contact tracing positively correlated with isolation and quarantine. However, most adults with COVID-19 isolated and self-notified contacts regardless of whether the public health workforce was able to reach them. Identifying and reaching contacts was challenging, and limited the ability to promote quarantining, and testing.

3.
SSM Qualitative research in health ; 2023.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2256841

ABSTRACT

Case investigation and contact tracing (CI/CT) is a critical part of the public health response to COVID-19. Individuals' experiences with CI/CT for COVID-19 varied based on geographic location, changes in knowledge and guidelines, access to testing and vaccination, as well as demographic characteristics including age, race, ethnicity, income, and political ideology. In this paper, we explore the experiences and behaviors of adults with positive SARS-CoV-2 test results, or who were exposed to a person with COVID-19, to understand their knowledge, motivations, and facilitators and barriers to their actions. We conducted focus groups and one-on-one interviews with 94 cases and 90 contacts from across the United States. We found that participants were concerned about infecting or exposing others, which motivated them to isolate or quarantine, notify contacts, and get tested. Although most cases and contacts were not contacted by CI/CT professionals, those who were reported a positive experience and received helpful information. Many cases and contacts reported seeking information from family, friends, health care providers, as well as television news and Internet sources. Although participants reported similar perspectives and experiences across demographic characteristics, some highlighted inequities in receiving COVID-19 information and resources.

4.
SSM Qual Res Health ; 3: 100244, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2256842

ABSTRACT

Case investigation and contact tracing (CI/CT) is a critical part of the public health response to COVID-19. Individuals' experiences with CI/CT for COVID-19 varied based on geographic location, changes in knowledge and guidelines, access to testing and vaccination, as well as demographic characteristics including age, race, ethnicity, income, and political ideology. In this paper, we explore the experiences and behaviors of adults with positive SARS-CoV-2 test results, or who were exposed to a person with COVID-19, to understand their knowledge, motivations, and facilitators and barriers to their actions. We conducted focus groups and one-on-one interviews with 94 cases and 90 contacts from across the United States. We found that participants were concerned about infecting or exposing others, which motivated them to isolate or quarantine, notify contacts, and get tested. Although most cases and contacts were not contacted by CI/CT professionals, those who were reported a positive experience and received helpful information. Many cases and contacts reported seeking information from family, friends, health care providers, as well as television news and Internet sources. Although participants reported similar perspectives and experiences across demographic characteristics, some highlighted inequities in receiving COVID-19 information and resources.

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