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1.
Lung India ; 39(SUPPL 1):S152-S153, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1857702

ABSTRACT

Background: Patients with Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by SARS-COV2 infection, can develop a potentially fatal rapid-onset pneumonia. In fact, mortality in patients hospitalized with COVID-19 can be as high as 20.3-27.9%.This study aimed to determine whether hyponatremia and hypernatremia are associated with a poor prognosis in patients admitted with COVID-19. Methods: Retrospective study conducted in Department of Respiratory Medicine, KIMS hospital and Research center, Bangalore , with a sample size of 1000 COVID 19 patients. Results: According to the above study, dysnatremia was found more in Category-C COVID19 patients, than cat A and Cat B, with 48.1% of patients in Cat C having dysnatremia, 29.9 % of Cat B and 24.3%of Cat C. In dysnatremia, hyponatremia was found was predominant among patients of Cat C COVID 19. Conclusion: Patients admitted with COVID 19, have risk of dysnatremia with increasing severity of the disease and it has significant impact on the morbidity and outcome of the patients.

2.
Lung India ; 39(SUPPL 1):S153, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1857701

ABSTRACT

Background: Post COVID-19 symptoms and diseases appeared on many survivors from COVID-19 which are similar to that of the post-severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) fatigue. Hence, the study aims to investigate and characterize the manifestations which appear after eradication of the coronavirus infection and its relation to disease severity. Methods: About 428 COVID 19 survivors were included in the study, they were questioned and data was collected regarding their post covid manifestations and presence of any comorbidities. Results: Amongst the 428 patients 15% of them had post COVID symptoms and fatigue and cough were predominantly seen. Conclusion: All subjects recovered from COVID-19 should undergo long-term monitoring for evaluation and treatment of symptoms and conditions that might be precipitated with the new coronavirus infection.

3.
Lung India ; 39(SUPPL 1):S147-S148, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1856947

ABSTRACT

Background: Novel coronavirus disease caused by SARSCoV- 2, primarily manifest as an acute respiratory illness;however, it can also affect multiple organs, such as kidneys, heart, digestive tract, hematological and the nervous system. Acute kidney injury (AKI) has been reported in up to 25% of critically-ill patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection, especially in those with underlying comorbidities. Aim of the Study: To study the incidence of Acute Kidney Injury in hospitalized COVID-19 patients. Methods: This is a retrospective study conducted in Dept of Respiratory Medicine, KIMS Hospital and Research Centre, Bengaluru. A total of 1000 COVID patients were taken in the order of their admission to the hospital from Jan -May 2021. Blood urea and serum creatinine levels at the time of admission was collected. Ethical clearance was obtained from the institutional ethical committee. Results: Statistically significant correlation was found between the incidence of AKI and the COVID-19 disease severity and mortality. Correlation by Pearson 2 tailed shows a positive correlation with a value of 0.713. Patients with renal involvement had higher overall mortality compared with patients without renal involvement. Adverse short-term outcomes of renal involvement were associated with severity of COVID-19 pneumonia Conclusion: AKI could be used as a clinical characteristic in severity classification and risk stratification. Further investigation of the underlying mechanism of renal disease in COVID-19 would be needed to clarify possible therapeutic targets.

4.
Lung India ; 39(SUPPL 1):S147, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1856946

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 caused by SARS-CoV-2 has led to an ongoing pandemic with massive global health and socioeconomic consequences. Monocytes are recruited under pathological conditions like viral infections to the affected tissue to defend the organism against invading pathogens and to aid in efficient resolution of inflammation. Some studies had suggested a significant decrease of monocytes in COVID-19 patients with severe or critical disease whereas some others suggested monocytosis. Aim of the Study: To find the association of Monocyte count alterations with the severity of COVID-19. Methods: This is a retrospective study conducted in Dept of Respiratory Medicine, KIMS Hospital and Research Centre, Bengaluru. A total of 1000 COVID patients were taken in the order of their admission from Jan-May 2021. Monocyte count in the blood at the time of admission was collected. Ethical clearance was obtained from the institutional ethical committee. Results: Higher monocyte count was seen in the younger age group, particularly in Category B COVID-19 patients. Statistically significant association was found between low monocyte count and the disease severity and mortality in patients with COVID-19. Conclusion: It is inferred that monocytes proliferate to eliminate the viruses in mild patients, while the loss of monocytes in the critical patients suggest that innate immunity might be suppressed to a certain extent in critical COVID-19. Deviation in monocytes count from the normal is a valuable discriminator for diagnosis of COVID-19 and suitable anticipator of overall spectrum of adverse consequences.

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