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3.
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry ; 92(7): 751-756, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269801

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Single cases and small series of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) have been reported during the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak worldwide. We evaluated incidence and clinical features of GBS in a cohort of patients from two regions of northern Italy with the highest number of patients with COVID-19. METHODS: GBS cases diagnosed in 12 referral hospitals from Lombardy and Veneto in March and April 2020 were retrospectively collected. As a control population, GBS diagnosed in March and April 2019 in the same hospitals were considered. RESULTS: Incidence of GBS in March and April 2020 was 0.202/100 000/month (estimated rate 2.43/100 000/year) vs 0.077/100 000/month (estimated rate 0.93/100 000/year) in the same months of 2019 with a 2.6-fold increase. Estimated incidence of GBS in COVID-19-positive patients was 47.9/100 000 and in the COVID-19-positive hospitalised patients was 236/100 000. COVID-19-positive patients with GBS, when compared with COVID-19-negative subjects, showed lower MRC sum score (26.3±18.3 vs 41.4±14.8, p=0.006), higher frequency of demyelinating subtype (76.6% vs 35.3%, p=0.011), more frequent low blood pressure (50% vs 11.8%, p=0.017) and higher rate of admission to intensive care unit (66.6% vs 17.6%, p=0.002). CONCLUSIONS: This study shows an increased incidence of GBS during the COVID-19 outbreak in northern Italy, supporting a pathogenic link. COVID-19-associated GBS is predominantly demyelinating and seems to be more severe than non-COVID-19 GBS, although it is likely that in some patients the systemic impairment due to COVID-19 might have contributed to the severity of the whole clinical picture.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/diagnosis , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/therapy , Hospitalization , Humans , Incidence , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Referral and Consultation , Retrospective Studies
4.
Neurophysiol Clin ; 51(2): 183-191, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1087170

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess whether patients with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) associated with SARS-CoV-2 show characteristic electrophysiological features. METHODS: Clinical and electrophysiological findings of 24 patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection and AIDP (S-AIDP) and of 48 control AIDP (C-AIDP) without SARS-CoV-2 infection were compared. RESULTS: S-AIDP patients more frequently developed respiratory failure (83.3% vs. 25%, P=0.000) and required intensive care unit (ICU) hospitalization (58.3% vs. 31.3%, P=0.000). In C-AIDP, distal motor latencies (DMLs) were more frequently prolonged (70.9% vs. 26.2%, P=0.000) whereas in S-AIDP distal compound muscle action potential (dCMAP) durations were more frequently increased (49.5% vs. 32.4%, P=0.002) and F waves were more often absent (45.6% vs. 31.8%, P=0.011). Presence of nerves with increased dCMAP duration and normal or slightly prolonged DML was elevenfold higher in S-AIDP (31.1% vs. 2.8%, P=0.000);11 S-AIDP patients showed this pattern in 2 nerves. CONCLUSION: Increased dCMAP duration, thought to be a marker of acquired demyelination, can also be oserved in critical illness myopathy. In S-AIDP patients, an increased dCMAP duration dissociated from prolonged DML, suggests additional muscle fiber conduction slowing, possibly due to a COVID-19-related hyperinflammatory state. Absent F waves, at least in some S-AIDP patients, may reflect α-motor neuron hypoexcitability because of immobilization during the ICU stay. These features should be considered in the electrodiagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 patients with weakness, to avoid misdiagnosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/etiology , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/physiopathology , Action Potentials , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Electrodiagnosis , Electrophysiological Phenomena , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Motor Neurons , Muscle, Skeletal/physiopathology , Neural Conduction , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Sensory Receptor Cells
5.
Arch Phys Med Rehabil ; 102(3): 359-362, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064811

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Prone positioning improves oxygenation in adult respiratory distress syndrome. This procedure has been widely used during the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic. However, this procedure can also be responsible for nerve damage and plexopathy. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed a series of 7 infectious patients with coronavirus disease 2019 who underwent prone positioning ventilation at the San Raffaele Hospital of Milan, Italy, during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. RESULTS: Clinical and neurophysiological data of 7 patients with nerve compression injuries have been reported. CONCLUSIONS: Health care workers should take into consideration the risk factors for prone positioning-related plexopathy and nerve damage, especially in patients with coronavirus disease 2019, to prevent this type of complication.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Nerve Compression Syndromes/etiology , Patient Positioning/adverse effects , Prone Position , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/physiopathology , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Arch Phys Med Rehabil ; 102(3): 359-362, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1056291

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Prone positioning improves oxygenation in adult respiratory distress syndrome. This procedure has been widely used during the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic. However, this procedure can also be responsible for nerve damage and plexopathy. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed a series of 7 infectious patients with coronavirus disease 2019 who underwent prone positioning ventilation at the San Raffaele Hospital of Milan, Italy, during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. RESULTS: Clinical and neurophysiological data of 7 patients with nerve compression injuries have been reported. CONCLUSIONS: Health care workers should take into consideration the risk factors for prone positioning-related plexopathy and nerve damage, especially in patients with coronavirus disease 2019, to prevent this type of complication.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Nerve Compression Syndromes/etiology , Patient Positioning/adverse effects , Prone Position , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/physiopathology , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
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