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1.
Rev Clin Esp (Barc) ; 2021 Jun 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1267901

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A high incidence of pulmonary embolism has been described during the coronavirus pandemic. METHODS: This work is a single-center retrospective study which reviewed computed tomography pulmonary angiograms ordered due to suspected pulmonary embolism during two periods: from March 1, 2020 to May 31, 2020 (pandemic) and during the same interval in 2019 (control). RESULTS: Twenty-two pulmonary embolisms were diagnosed during the control period and 99 in the pandemic, 74 of which were associated with COVID-19. Of all patients hospitalized with COVID-19, 5.3% had a pulmonary embolism, with a delay between the two diagnoses of 9.1 ± 8.4 days. During the pandemic, patients with pulmonary embolism had fewer predisposing conditions (previous pulmonary embolism 5.1 vs. 18.2%, p = .05; previous surgery 2 vs. 35.4%, p = .0001; deep vein thrombosis 11.1 vs. 45.5%, p = .0001); peripheral pulmonary embolisms were the most frequent (73.5 vs. 50%, p = . 029). CONCLUSIONS: There is an increased risk of having a pulmonary embolism during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, which affects patients with a different clinical profile and more often causes distal pulmonary embolisms.

2.
Rev Clin Esp ; 2021 Jan 16.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1047800

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A high incidence of pulmonary embolism has been described during the coronavirus pandemic. METHODS: This work is a single-center retrospective study which reviewed computed tomography pulmonary angiograms ordered due to suspected pulmonary embolism during two periods: from March 1, 2020 to May 31, 2020 (pandemic) and during the same interval in 2019 (control). RESULTS: Twenty-two pulmonary embolism were diagnosed during the control period and 99 in the pandemic, 74 of which were associated with COVID-19. Of all patients hospitalized with COVID-19, 5.3% had a pulmonary embolism, with a delay between the two diagnoses of 9.1+/-8.4 days. During the pandemic, patients with pulmonary embolism had fewer predisposing conditions (previous pulmonary embolism 5.1% vs. 18.2%, p = .05; previous surgery 2% vs. 35.4%, p = .0001; deep vein thrombosis 11.1% vs. 45.5%, p=.0001); peripheral pulmonary embolisms were the most frequent (73.5% vs. 50%, p =. 029). CONCLUSIONS: There is an increased risk of having a pulmonary embolism during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, which affects patients with a different clinical profile and more often causes distal pulmonary embolisms.

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