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2.
Intensive Care Med ; 48(7): 876-887, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1941491

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Epidemiologic studies have documented lower rates of active smokers compared to former or non-smokers in symptomatic patients affected by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We assessed the efficacy and safety of nicotine administered by a transdermal patch in critically ill patients with COVID-19 pneumonia. METHODS: In this multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted in 18 intensive care units in France, we randomly assigned adult patients (non-smokers, non-vapers or who had quit smoking/vaping for at least 12 months) with proven COVID-19 pneumonia receiving invasive mechanical ventilation for up to 72 h to receive transdermal patches containing either nicotine at a daily dose of 14 mg or placebo until 48 h following successful weaning from mechanical ventilation or for a maximum of 30 days, followed by 3-week dose tapering by 3.5 mg per week. Randomization was stratified by centre, non- or former smoker status and Sequential Organ Function Assessment score (< or ≥ 7). The primary outcome was day-28 mortality. Main prespecified secondary outcomes included 60-day mortality, time to successful extubation, days alive and free from mechanical ventilation, renal replacement therapy, vasopressor support or organ failure at day 28. RESULTS: Between November 6th 2020, and April 2nd 2021, 220 patients were randomized from 18 active recruiting centers. After excluding 2 patients who withdrew consent, 218 patients (152 [70%] men) were included in the analysis: 106 patients to the nicotine group and 112 to the placebo group. Day-28 mortality did not differ between the two groups (30 [28%] of 106 patients in the nicotine group vs 31 [28%] of 112 patients in the placebo group; odds ratio 1.03 [95% confidence interval, CI 0.57-1.87]; p = 0.46). The median number of day-28 ventilator-free days was 0 (IQR 0-14) in the nicotine group and 0 (0-13) in the placebo group (with a difference estimate between the medians of 0 [95% CI -3-7]). Adverse events likely related to nicotine were rare (3%) and similar between the two groups. CONCLUSION: In patients having developed severe COVID-19 pneumonia requiring invasive mechanical ventilation, transdermal nicotine did not significantly reduce day-28 mortality. There is no indication to use nicotine in this situation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , COVID-19/therapy , Double-Blind Method , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Nicotine/adverse effects , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
3.
J Fungi (Basel) ; 8(7)2022 Jun 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1911436

ABSTRACT

Whether severe COVID-19 is by itself a significant risk factor for the development of candidemia currently remains an open question as conflicting results have been published. We aim to assess the occurrence of candidemia in patients with severe COVID-19 admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). We conducted a retrospective study on patients with severe SARS-CoV-2-related pneumonia admitted to 5 ICUs in France who were specifically screened for fungal complications between March 2020 and January 2021. The study population included a total of 264 patients; the median age was 56 years old and most of them were male (n = 186; 70.5%) and immunocompetent (n = 225; 87.5%), and 62.7% (n = 153/244) were on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support. Microbiological analysis included 4864 blood culture samples and beta-glucan test performed on 975 sera. Candidemia was diagnosed in 13 (4.9%) patients. The species involved were mainly C. albicans (n = 6) and C. parapsilosis (n = 5). Almost all patients (12/13; 92.3%) had a colonization by yeasts. ICU mortality was not significantly impacted by the occurrence of candidemia. Unrelated positive beta-glucan tests were observed in 49 patients (23.4%), including 6 with mold infections and 43 with false positive results. In our series, patients with severe SARS-CoV-2-related pneumonia seemed at low risk of developing invasive candidiasis.

4.
Crit Care ; 26(1): 48, 2022 02 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1703362

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2)-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) causes high mortality. Umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (UC-MSCs) have potentially relevant immune-modulatory properties, whose place in ARDS treatment is not established. This phase 2b trial was undertaken to assess the efficacy of UC-MSCs in patients with SARS-CoV-2-induced ARDS. METHODS: This multicentre, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial (STROMA-CoV-2) recruited adults (≥ 18 years) with SARS-CoV-2-induced early (< 96 h) mild-to-severe ARDS in 10 French centres. Patients were randomly assigned to receive three intravenous infusions of 106 UC-MSCs/kg or placebo (0.9% NaCl) over 5 days after recruitment. For the modified intention-to-treat population, the primary endpoint was the partial pressure of oxygen to fractional inspired oxygen (PaO2/FiO2)-ratio change between baseline (day (D) 0) and D7. RESULTS: Among the 107 patients screened for eligibility from April 6, 2020, to October 29, 2020, 45 were enrolled, randomized and analyzed. PaO2/FiO2 changes between D0 and D7 did not differ significantly between the UC-MSCs and placebo groups (medians [IQR] 54.3 [- 15.5 to 93.3] vs 25.3 [- 33.3 to 104.6], respectively; ANCOVA estimated treatment effect 7.4, 95% CI - 44.7 to 59.7; P = 0.77). Six (28.6%) of the 21 UC-MSCs recipients and six of 24 (25%) placebo-group patients experienced serious adverse events, none of which were related to UC-MSCs treatment. CONCLUSIONS: D0-to-D7 PaO2/FiO2 changes for intravenous UC-MSCs-versus placebo-treated adults with SARS-CoV-2-induced ARDS did not differ significantly. Repeated UC-MSCs infusions were not associated with any serious adverse events during treatment or thereafter (until D28). Larger trials enrolling patients earlier during the course of their ARDS are needed to further assess UC-MSCs efficacy in this context. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT04333368. Registered 01 April 2020, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/history/NCT04333368 .


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mesenchymal Stem Cells , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Double-Blind Method , Humans , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
5.
Vieillard-Baron, Antoine, Flicoteaux, Rémi, Salmona, Maud, Annane, Djillali, Ayed, Soufia, Azoulay, Elie, Bellaiche, Raphael, Beloucif, Sadek, Berti, Enora, Bertier, Astrid, Besset, Sébastien, Bret, Marlène, Cariou, Alain, Carpentier, Christophe, Chaouch, Oussama, Chariot, Appoline, Charron, Cyril, Charpentier, Julien, Cheurfa, Cherifa, Cholley, Bernard, Clerc, Sébastien, Combes, Alain, Chousterman, Benjamin, Cohen, Yves, Constantin, Jean-Michel, Damoisel, Charles, Darmon, Michael, Degos, Vincent, D’Ableiges, Bertrand De Maupeou, Demeret, Sophie, Montmollin, Etienne De, Demoule, Alexandre, Depret, Francois, Diehl, Jean-Luc, Djibré, Michel, Do, Chung-Hi, Dudoignon, Emmanuel, Duranteau, Jacques, Fartoukh, Muriel, Fieux, Fabienne, Gayat, Etienne, Gennequin, Mael, Guidet, Bertrand, Gutton, Christophe, Hamada, Sophie, Heming, Nicholas, Jouffroy, Romain, Keita-Meyer, Hawa, Langeron, Olivier, Lortat-Jacob, Brice, Marey, Jonathan, Mebazaa, Alexandre, Megarbane, Bruno, Mekontso-Dessap, Armand, Mira, Jean-Paul, Molle, Julie, Mongardon, Nicolas, Montravers, Philippe, Morelot-Panzini, Capucine, Nemlaghi, Safaa, Nguyen, Bao-long, Parrot, Antoine, Pasqualotto, Romain, Peron, Nicolas, Picard, Lucile, de Chambrun, Marc Pineton, Planquette, Benjamin, Plaud, Benoit, Pons, Stéphanie, Quesnel, Christophe, Raphalen, Jean-Herlé, Razazi, Keyvan, Ricard, Jean-Damien, Roche, Anne, Rohaut, Benjamin, Roux, Damien, Savale, Laurent, Sobotka, Jennifer, Teboul, Jean-Louis, Timsit, Jean-François, Voiriot, Guillaume, Weiss, Emmanuel, Wildenberg, Lucille, Zogheib, Elie, Riou, Bruno, Batteux, Frédéric.
EuropePMC;
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-327150

ABSTRACT

Importance Information about the severity of Omicron is scarce. Objective To report the respective risk of ICU admission in patients hospitalized with Delta and Omicron variants and to compare the characteristics and disease severity of critically ill patients infected with both variants according to vaccination status. Design Analysis from the APHP database, called Reality, prospectively recording the following information in consecutive patients admitted in the ICU for COVID-19: age, sex, immunosuppression, vaccination, pneumonia, need for invasive mechanical ventilation, time between symptom onset and ICU admission, and in-ICU mortality. Retrospective analysis on an administrative database, “Système d’Information pour le Suivi des Victimes” (SI-VIC), which lists hospitalized COVID-19 patients. Setting 39 hospitals in the Paris area from APHP group. Participants Patients hospitalized from December 1, 2021 to January 18, 2022 for COVID-19. Main outcomes and measures Risk of ICU admission was evaluated in 3761 patients and Omicron cases were compared to Delta cases in the ICU in 888 consecutive patients. Results On January 18, 45% of patients in the ICU and 63.8% of patients in conventional hospital units were infected with the Omicron variant (p < 0.001). The risk of ICU admission with Omicron was reduced by 64% than with Delta (9.3% versus 25.8% of cases, respectively, p < 0.001). In critically ill patients, 400 had the Delta variant, 229 the Omicron variant, 98 had an uninformative variant screening test and 161 did not have information on variant screening test. 747 patients (84.1%) were admitted for pneumonia. Compared to patients infected with Delta, Omicron patients were more vaccinated (p<0.001), even with 3 doses, more immunocompromised (p<0.001), less admitted for pneumonia (p<0.001), especially when vaccinated (62.1% in vaccinated versus 80.7% in unvaccinated, p<0.001), and less invasively ventilated (p=0.02). Similar results were found in the subgroup of pneumonia but Omicron cases were older. Unadjusted in-ICU mortality did not differ between Omicron and Delta cases, neither in the overall population (20.0% versus 27.9%, p = 0.08), nor in patients with pneumonia (31.6% versus 29.7%, respectively) where adjusted in-ICU mortality did not differ according to the variant (HR 1.43 95%CI [0.89;2.29], p=0.14). Conclusion and relevance Compared to the Delta variant, the Omicron variant is less likely to result in ICU admission and less likely to be associated with pneumonia. However, when patients with the Omicron variant are admitted for pneumonia, the severity seems similar to that of patients with the Delta variant, with more immunocompromised and vaccinated patients and no difference in adjusted in-ICU mortality. Further studies are needed to confirm our results.

6.
J Neurochem ; 161(6): 492-505, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1532824

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is associated with encephalitis in critically ill patients and endothelial dysfunction seems to contribute to this life-threatening complication. Our objective was to determine the hallmark of endothelial activation in COVID-19-related encephalitis. In an observational study in intensive care unit (ICU), we compared vascular biomarkers of critically ill COVID-19 patients with or without encephalitis. To be classified in the encephalitis group, patients had to have new onset of central neurologic symptom, and pathological findings on either brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and/or electroencephalogram (EEG). Among the 32 critically ill COVID-19 consecutive patients, 21 were categorized in the control group and 11 in the encephalitis group. Encephalitis patients had a longer ICU stay than control patients (median length [25th-75th percentile] of 52 [16-79] vs. 20.5 [11-44] days, respectively, p = 0.04). Nine-month overall follow-up mortality reached 21% (7/32 patients), with mortality rates in the encephalitis group and the control group of 27% and 19%, respectively. Encephalitis was associated with significant higher release of soluble endothelial activation markers (sE-selectin, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin 6, placental growth factor, and thrombomodulin), but these increases were correlated with TNF-α plasmatic levels. The hypoxia-inducible protein angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4) was at significantly higher levels in encephalitis patients compared to control patients (p = 0.0099), and in contrary to the other increased factors, was not correlated with TNF-α levels (r = 0.2832, p = 0.1163). Our findings suggest that COVID-19-related encephalitis is a cytokine-associated acute brain dysfunction. ANGPTL4 was the only elevated marker found in encephalitis patients, which was not correlated with systemic inflammation, suggesting that ANGPTL4 might be a relevant factor to predict encephalitis in critically ill COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Encephalitis , Angiopoietin-Like Protein 4/metabolism , Biomarkers , COVID-19/complications , Critical Illness , Encephalitis/virology , Endothelial Cells , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
7.
Brain Commun ; 3(3): fcab135, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1360337

ABSTRACT

A variety of neuropsychiatric complications has been described in association with COVID-19 infection. Large scale studies presenting a wider picture of these complications and their relative frequency are lacking. The objective of our study was to describe the spectrum of neurological and psychiatric complications in patients with COVID-19 seen in a multidisciplinary hospital centre over 6 months. We conducted a retrospective, observational study of all patients showing neurological or psychiatric symptoms in the context of COVID-19 seen in the medical and university neuroscience department of Assistance Publique Hopitaux de Paris-Sorbonne University. We collected demographic data, comorbidities, symptoms and severity of COVID-19 infection, neurological and psychiatric symptoms, neurological and psychiatric examination data and, when available, results from CSF analysis, MRI, EEG and EMG. A total of 249 COVID-19 patients with a de novo neurological or psychiatric manifestation were included in the database and 245 were included in the final analyses. One-hundred fourteen patients (47%) were admitted to the intensive care unit and 10 (4%) died. The most frequent neuropsychiatric complications diagnosed were encephalopathy (43%), critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy (26%), isolated psychiatric disturbance (18%) and cerebrovascular disorders (16%). No patients showed CSF evidence of SARS-CoV-2. Encephalopathy was associated with older age and higher risk of death. Critical illness neuromyopathy was associated with an extended stay in the intensive care unit. The majority of these neuropsychiatric complications could be imputed to critical illness, intensive care and systemic inflammation, which contrasts with the paucity of more direct SARS-CoV-2-related complications or post-infection disorders.

8.
J Allergy Clin Immunol ; 147(6): 2098-2107, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269289

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Markedly elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines and defective type-I interferon responses were reported in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine whether particular cytokine profiles are associated with COVID-19 severity and mortality. METHODS: Cytokine concentrations and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 antigen were measured at hospital admission in serum of symptomatic patients with COVID-19 (N = 115), classified at hospitalization into 3 respiratory severity groups: no need for mechanical ventilatory support (No-MVS), intermediate severity requiring mechanical ventilatory support (MVS), and critical severity requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Principal-component analysis was used to characterize cytokine profiles associated with severity and mortality. The results were thereafter confirmed in an independent validation cohort (N = 86). RESULTS: At time of hospitalization, ECMO patients presented a dominant proinflammatory response with elevated levels of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10. In contrast, an elevated type-I interferon response involving IFN-α and IFN-ß was characteristic of No-MVS patients, whereas MVS patients exhibited both profiles. Mortality at 1 month was associated with higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines in ECMO patients, higher levels of type-I interferons in No-MVS patients, and their combination in MVS patients, resulting in a combined mortality prediction accuracy of 88.5% (risk ratio, 24.3; P < .0001). Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 antigen levels correlated with type-I interferon levels and were associated with mortality, but not with proinflammatory response or severity. CONCLUSIONS: Distinct cytokine profiles are observed in association with COVID-19 severity and are differentially predictive of mortality according to oxygen support modalities. These results warrant personalized treatment of COVID-19 patients based on cytokine profiling.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cytokines/immunology , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
9.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(3): e211489, 2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1130417

ABSTRACT

Importance: There is evidence of central nervous system impairments associated with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection, including encephalopathy. Multimodal monitoring of patients with COVID-19 may delineate the specific features of COVID-19-related encephalopathy and guide clinical management. Objectives: To investigate clinical, biological, and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in association with electroencephalographic (EEG) features for patients with COVID-19, and to better refine the features of COVID-19-related encephalopathy. Design, Setting, and Participants: This retrospective cohort study conducted in Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France, enrolled 78 hospitalized adults who received a diagnosis of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-Cov2) and underwent EEG between March 30 and June 11, 2020. Exposures: Detection of SARS-CoV-2 from a nasopharyngeal specimen using a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay or, in the case of associated pneumonia, on a computed tomography scan of the chest. Main Outcomes and Measures: Data on the clinical and paraclinical features of the 78 patients with COVID-19 were retrieved from electronic patient records. Results: Of 644 patients who were hospitalized for COVID-19, 78 (57 men [73%]; mean [SD] age, 61 [12] years) underwent EEG. The main indications for EEG were delirium, seizure-like events, and delayed awakening in the intensive care unit after stopping treatment with sedatives. Sixty-nine patients showed pathologic EEG findings, including metabolic-toxic encephalopathy features, frontal abnormalities, periodic discharges, and epileptic activities. Of 57 patients who underwent brain MRI, 41 showed abnormalities, including perfusion abnormalities, acute ischemic lesions, multiple microhemorrhages, and white matter-enhancing lesions. Fifty-five patients showed biological abnormalities, including dysnatremia, kidney failure, and liver dysfunction, the same day as the EEG. The results of cerebrospinal fluid analysis were negative for SARS-Cov-2 for all tested patients. Nine patients who had no identifiable cause of brain injury outside COVID-19 were further isolated; their brain injury was defined as COVID-19-related encephalopathy. They represented 1% (9 of 644) of patients with COVID-19 requiring hospitalization. Six of these 9 patients had movement disorders, 7 had frontal syndrome, 4 had brainstem impairment, 4 had periodic EEG discharges, and 3 had MRI white matter-enhancing lesions. Conclusions and Relevance: The results from this cohort of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 suggest there are clinical, EEG, and MRI patterns that could delineate specific COVID-19-related encephalopathy and guide treatment strategy.


Subject(s)
Brain Diseases/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , SARS-CoV-2 , Cohort Studies , Electroencephalography , Electronic Health Records , Female , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged
10.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med ; 203(3): 307-317, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1041932

ABSTRACT

Rationale: Whether severe coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is a significant risk factor for the development of invasive fungal superinfections is of great medical interest and remains, for now, an open question.Objectives: We aim to assess the occurrence of invasive fungal respiratory superinfections in patients with severe COVID-19.Methods: We conducted the study on patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-related pneumonia admitted to five ICUs in France who had respiratory and serum sampling performed for specific screening of fungal complications.Measurements and Main Results: The study population included a total of 145 patients; the median age was 55 years old. Most of them were male (n = 104; 72%), were overweight (n = 99; 68%), and had hypertension (n = 83; 57%) and diabetes (n = 46; 32%). Few patients presented preexisting host risk factors for invasive fungal infection (n = 20; 14%). Their global severity was high; all patients were on invasive mechanical ventilation, and half (n = 73, 54%) were on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support. Mycological analysis included 2,815 mycological tests (culture, galactomannan, ß-glucan, and PCR) performed on 475 respiratory samples and 532 sera. A probable/putative invasive pulmonary mold infection was diagnosed in 7 (4.8%) patients and linked to high mortality. Multivariate analysis indicates a significantly higher risk for solid organ transplant recipients (odds ratio, = 4.66; interquartile range, 1.98-7.34; P = 0.004). False-positive fungal test and clinically irrelevant colonization, which did not require the initiation of antifungal treatment, was observed in 25 patients (17.2%).Conclusions: In patients with no underlying immunosuppression, severe SARS-CoV-2-related pneumonia seems at low risk of invasive fungal secondary infection, especially aspergillosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Invasive Fungal Infections/epidemiology , Lung Diseases, Fungal/epidemiology , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Female , France , Hospitalization , Humans , Invasive Fungal Infections/diagnosis , Lung Diseases, Fungal/diagnosis , Male , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
11.
Aust Crit Care ; 34(2): 142-145, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-996654

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Intensive care unit (ICU) healthcare workers (HCWs) are at the forefront of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. To overcome the lack of human resources during this crisis, some ICUs had to mobilise staff from a reinforcement pool, with no or outdated ICU experience. This study aimed to investigate and to compare the psychological impact of the pandemic on regular ICU staff members and reinforcement workers. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Self-assessment questionnaires were completed by HCWs who worked from March 1 to April 30, 2020, in our 16-bed neurological ICU at La Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital in Paris, France, which was converted to a COVID ICU. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist for DSM-5, McGill Quality of Life Questionnaire-Revised, and 10-item Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale were used to assess anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, quality of life, and resilience, respectively. RESULTS: Sixty-nine ICU HCWs completed the survey (37 from the team of regular staff members, i.e., from the public health service, and 32 from a reinforcement pool, either from non-ICU public health service or from private healthcare interim employment agencies). Prevalence of anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms was high, at 19%, 9%, and 16%, respectively, with limited impairment in quality of life or resilience scores. Depression symptoms were observed more in regular staff members than in welcomed reinforcement workers, at 16% and 0%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: These results revealed that during the pandemic, HCWs from the team of regular staff members were at greater risk of developing psychological disorder compared with reinforcement workers, with higher levels of depressive symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Intensive Care Units , Medical Staff, Hospital/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Paris/epidemiology , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
Radiology ; 297(3): E313-E323, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-930394

ABSTRACT

Background This study provides a detailed imaging assessment in a large series of patients infected with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and presenting with neurologic manifestations. Purpose To review the MRI findings associated with acute neurologic manifestations in patients with COVID-19. Materials and Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted between March 23 and May 7, 2020, at the Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, a reference center for COVID-19 in the Paris area. Adult patients were included if they had a diagnosis of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection with acute neurologic manifestations and referral for brain MRI. Patients with a prior history of neurologic disease were excluded. The characteristics and frequency of different MRI features were investigated. The findings were analyzed separately in patients in intensive care units (ICUs) and other departments (non-ICU). Results During the inclusion period, 1176 patients suspected of having COVID-19 were hospitalized. Of 308 patients with acute neurologic symptoms, 73 met the inclusion criteria and were included (23.7%): thirty-five patients were in the ICU (47.9%) and 38 were not (52.1%). The mean age was 58.5 years ± 15.6 [standard deviation], with a male predominance (65.8% vs 34.2%). Forty-three patients had abnormal MRI findings 2-4 weeks after symptom onset (58.9%), including 17 with acute ischemic infarct (23.3%), one with a deep venous thrombosis (1.4%), eight with multiple microhemorrhages (11.3%), 22 with perfusion abnormalities (47.7%), and three with restricted diffusion foci within the corpus callosum consistent with cytotoxic lesions of the corpus callosum (4.1%). Multifocal white matter-enhancing lesions were seen in four patients in the ICU (5%). Basal ganglia abnormalities were seen in four other patients (5%). Cerebrospinal fluid analyses were negative for SARS-CoV-2 in all patients tested (n = 39). Conclusion In addition to cerebrovascular lesions, perfusion abnormalities, cytotoxic lesions of the corpus callosum, and intensive care unit-related complications, we identified two patterns including white matter-enhancing lesions and basal ganglia abnormalities that could be related to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection. © RSNA, 2020 Online supplemental material is available for this article.


Subject(s)
Brain/diagnostic imaging , Cerebrovascular Disorders/complications , Cerebrovascular Disorders/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Acute Disease , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , Brain/physiopathology , COVID-19 , Cerebrovascular Disorders/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
14.
J Clin Apher ; 36(1): 179-182, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-737548

ABSTRACT

Here we describe the effect of therapeutic plasma exchange with 5% albumin as sole replacement solution for the management of Covid-19. A 74-year-old man was admitted for severe Covid-19 acute respiratory distress syndrome. Based on the growing body of evidence that cytokine release syndrome, and especially interleukin-6, plays a key role in critically ill Covid-19 patients, we decided to implement therapeutic plasma exchange as a rescue therapy. The patient's clinical status rapidly improved, and biological records showed convincing results of decrease in interleukin-6 and inflammatory parameters under treatment. This case presents a proof-of-concept for the use of therapeutic plasma exchange with 5% albumin as sole replacement solution in a critically ill Covid-19 patient with cytokine release syndrome. This could constitute a major benefit in terms of security compared to long-lasting immunosuppressive monoclonal antibodies, or to therapeutic plasma exchange with plasma as replacement fluid. Hence, we think that a further evaluation of risk-benefit balance of this therapy in severe cases of Covid-19 should rapidly be undertaken.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Critical Illness/therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/therapy , Plasma Exchange , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Albumins , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , Combined Modality Therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Fibrinogen/analysis , Humans , Interleukin-6/blood , Male , Oxygen/blood , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/etiology , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Salvage Therapy , Solutions
15.
Epilepsia ; 61(8): e90-e94, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-615330

ABSTRACT

Neurological manifestations of coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) such as encephalitis and seizures have been reported increasingly, but our understanding of COVID-19-related brain injury is still limited. Herein we describe prefrontal involvement in a patient with COVID-19 who presented prior anosmia, raising the question of a potential trans-olfactory bulb brain invasion.


Subject(s)
Brain Diseases/pathology , Brain Diseases/virology , COVID-19/complications , Frontal Lobe/pathology , Status Epilepticus/virology , Aged , Brain Diseases/physiopathology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Frontal Lobe/physiopathology , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Status Epilepticus/pathology , Status Epilepticus/physiopathology
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