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2.
Polit Q ; 2020 Jul 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1932154

ABSTRACT

Universities UK (UUK) has suggested that there may be very significant losses to higher education as a consequence of Covid-19. However, losses are likely to be substantially lower than the potential losses estimated by UUK. But the magnitude of losses is very uncertain. The UUK's proposal to restrict undergraduate enrolment per university to stop institutions poaching students is not in the interests of the most highly regarded universities, or that of students. Some rationalisation of the sector should be the price of further government support. Now is also the time to reconsider how university research is funded.

4.
Topics in Antiviral Medicine ; 30(1 SUPPL):17, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1881061

ABSTRACT

Background: Knowing the true incidence of HIV-1 infections (recent infections) among people newly diagnosed is pivotal to monitoring the course of the epidemic. We have developed a Primer ID Next Gen Sequencing (PID-NGS) assay to identify recent infection by measuring within-host viral diversity over multiple regions of the HIV-1 genome. We implemented a state-wide project to identify recent infections and transmitted drug resistance mutations (DRMs) in diagnostic samples in near real time. Methods: Serum samples from individuals with newly HIV-1 diagnoses (diagnostic sample collected within 30 days of diagnosis) were sequenced. PID-NGS libraries were constructed covering the coding regions for protease, a portion of reverse transcriptase, integrase, and the env gene. The use of the PID-NGS strategy allows for significant error correction and also a definition of the sampling depth of the viral population. Recent infection was defined as within 9-month of infection. DRMs were summarized at detection sensitivities of 30%, 10% and 1% based on viral population sampling depth. Results: From Jan 2018 to Jun 2021, we successfully sequenced partial genomes from 743 individuals with new diagnoses. Year 2020 had the lowest number of new diagnoses (Fig 1a, red bar). Overall, 39.2% of samples were inferred to have represented infection within the previous 9 months. Percent of recent infection varied significantly over the years, increasing from 29.6% in late 2018 to 50.9% in early 2020, but decreasing significantly to 32.7% in 2021 (Fig 1a, blue lines). Individuals younger than 30 y/o were more likely to be identified with recent infection (p<0.01). NNRTI DRMs, especially K103N, were the most abundant DRMs. Fig 1b shows the trend of DRMs over the four years. We observed a trend of decrease in the overall NNRTI DRMs and an increase in the NRTI DRMs in the population. Further analysis suggests that the increase in NRTI DRMs were from TAMs and their revertants, while clinically important NRTI DRMs (K65R and M184) were low (<1%). Conclusion: We have demonstrated a state-wide, all-in-one platform to monitor HIV-1 recency and DRMs in new diagnoses. The number of new diagnoses decreased significantly in 2020 in concert with the COVID-19 pandemic which suggests a decrease in overall HIV testing. The decline in the percentage of recent infections in early 2021 signals a return to broader HIV-1 testing and diagnosis. The increase of other NRTI DRMs suggests ongoing evolution at these sites within the viral population.

6.
Apuntes Universitarios ; 12(3):253-266, 2022.
Article in Spanish | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1856433

ABSTRACT

The general objective of this research was to determine the relationship between the level of knowledge and perceptions of acceptance of the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine in residents of the Peruvian highlands. The type of study corresponds to the quantitative approach, it was a non-experimental cross-sectional design of descriptive correlational type, probabilistic test, simple casual type, the sample consisted of 384 residents between 18-59 years of age. The instruments used were the KNOW-P-COVID-19 and VAC-COVID-19 scales prepared by Mejia. The results showed that 63.8% have high knowledge and 36.2% have low knowledge about COVID-19, in addition, they reveal that 70.6% of the population would not be vaccinated and 29.4% of the population would be vaccinated, according to their perception, in terms of Pearson's correlation it is shown that there is a significantly inverse correlation (bilateral sig. is = 0.000<0.05). In conclusion, at a significance level of 5%, there is a direct and significant connection, that is, the greater the knowledge about COVID-19, the greater the perception of acceptance of the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine in residents. from the Peruvian highlands.

7.
Journal of the American College of Cardiology ; 79(9):1312-1312, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1849195
8.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-333116

ABSTRACT

Background and Rationale Approximately 35% of all COVID-19 deaths occurred in Skilled Nursing Facilities (SNFs). In a healthy general population, wearables have shown promise in providing early alerts for actionable interventions during the pandemic. We tested this promise in a cohort of SNFs patients diagnosed with COVID-19 and admitted for post-acute care under quarantine. We tested if 1) deployment of wearables and contact-free biosensors is feasible in the setting of SNFs and 2) they can provide early and actionable insights into deterioration. Methods This prospective clinical trial has been IRB-approved ( NCT04548895 ). We deployed two commercially available devices detecting continuously every 2-3 minutes heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR) and uniquely providing the following biometrics: 1) the wrist-worn bracelet by Biostrap yielded continuous oxygen saturation (O2Sat), 2) the under-mattress ballistocardiography sensor by Emfit tracked in-bed activity, tossing, and sleep disturbances. Patients also underwent routine monitoring by staff every 2-4 h. For death outcomes, cases are reported due to the small sample size. For palliative care versus at-home discharges, we report mean±SD at p<0.05. Results From 12/2020 - 03/2021, we approached 26 PCR-confirmed SarsCoV2-positive patients at two SNFs: 5 declined, 21 were enrolled into monitoring by both sensors (female=13, male=8;age 77.2±9.1). We recorded outcomes as discharged to home (8, 38%), palliative care (9, 43%) or death (4, 19%). The O2Sat threshold of 91% alerted for intervention. Biostrap captured hypoxic events below 91% nine times as often as the routine intermittent pulse oximetry. In the patient deceased, two weeks prior we observed a wide range of O2Sat values (65-95%) captured by the Biostrap device and not noticeable with the routine vital sign spot checks. In this patient, the Emfit sensor yielded a markedly reduced RR (7/min) in contrast to 18/min from two routine spot checks performed in the same period of observation as well as compared to the seven patients discharged home over a total of 86 days of monitoring (RR 19± 4). Among the patients discharged to palliative care, a total of 76 days were monitored, HR did not differ compared to the patients discharged home (68±8 vs 70±7 bpm). However, we observed a statistically significant reduction of RR at 16±4/min as well as the variances in RR (10±6 vs 19±4/min vs16±13) and activity of palliative care patients vs. patients discharged home. Conclusion/Discussion We demonstrate that wearables and under-mattress sensors can be integrated successfully into the SNF workflows and are well tolerated by the patients. Moreover, specific early changes of oxygen saturation fluctuations and other biometrics herald deterioration from COVID-19 two weeks in advance and evaded detection without the devices. Wearable devices and under-mattress sensors in SNFs hold significant potential for early disease detection.

9.
Preprint in English | medRxiv | ID: ppmedrxiv-22273202

ABSTRACT

Background and RationaleApproximately 35% of all COVID-19 deaths occurred in Skilled Nursing Facilities (SNFs). In a healthy general population, wearables have shown promise in providing early alerts for actionable interventions during the pandemic. We tested this promise in a cohort of SNFs patients diagnosed with COVID-19 and admitted for post-acute care under quarantine. We tested if 1) deployment of wearables and contact-free biosensors is feasible in the setting of SNFs and 2) they can provide early and actionable insights into deterioration. MethodsThis prospective clinical trial has been IRB-approved (NCT04548895). We deployed two commercially available devices detecting continuously every 2-3 minutes heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR) and uniquely providing the following biometrics: 1) the wrist-worn bracelet by Biostrap yielded continuous oxygen saturation (O2Sat), 2) the under-mattress ballistocardiography sensor by Emfit tracked in-bed activity, tossing, and sleep disturbances. Patients also underwent routine monitoring by staff every 2-4 h. For death outcomes, cases are reported due to the small sample size. For palliative care versus at-home discharges, we report mean{+/-}SD at p<0.05. ResultsFrom 12/2020 - 03/2021, we approached 26 PCR-confirmed SarsCoV2-positive patients at two SNFs: 5 declined, 21 were enrolled into monitoring by both sensors (female=13, male=8; age 77.2{+/-}9.1). We recorded outcomes as discharged to home (8, 38%), palliative care (9, 43%) or death (4, 19%). The O2Sat threshold of 91% alerted for intervention. Biostrap captured hypoxic events below 91% nine times as often as the routine intermittent pulse oximetry. In the patient deceased, two weeks prior we observed a wide range of O2Sat values (65-95%) captured by the Biostrap device and not noticeable with the routine vital sign spot checks. In this patient, the Emfit sensor yielded a markedly reduced RR (7/min) in contrast to 18/min from two routine spot checks performed in the same period of observation as well as compared to the seven patients discharged home over a total of 86 days of monitoring (RR 19{+/-} 4). Among the patients discharged to palliative care, a total of 76 days were monitored, HR did not differ compared to the patients discharged home (68{+/-}8 vs 70{+/-}7 bpm). However, we observed a statistically significant reduction of RR at 16{+/-}4/min as well as the variances in RR (10{+/-}6 vs 19{+/-}4/min vs16{+/-}13) and activity of palliative care patients vs. patients discharged home. Conclusion/DiscussionWe demonstrate that wearables and under-mattress sensors can be integrated successfully into the SNF workflows and are well tolerated by the patients. Moreover, specific early changes of oxygen saturation fluctuations and other biometrics herald deterioration from COVID-19 two weeks in advance and evaded detection without the devices. Wearable devices and under-mattress sensors in SNFs hold significant potential for early disease detection.

10.
Infection ; 2022 Feb 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1712372

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has led to the approval of novel vaccines with different mechanisms of action. Until now, more than 4.7 billion persons have been vaccinated around the world, and adverse effects not observed in pre-authorization trials are being reported at low frequency. METHODS: We report a case of severe hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) after SARS-CoV-2 immunization and performed a literature search for all reported cases of COVID-19 vaccine-associated HLH. RESULTS: A 24-year-old female developed HLH after immunization with the mRNA COVID-19 vaccine Comirnaty. Diagnosis was made according to HLH-2004 criteria; the HScore was 259 (> 99% HLH probability) with maximum ferritin of 138.244 µg/L. The patient was initially treated with intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIGs) and dexamethasone without response. The addition of the human interleukin 1 receptor antagonist Anakinra resulted in full recovery within 6 weeks after vaccination. A literature search revealed 15 additional cases of HLH after SARS-CoV-2 vaccination, the majority after immunization with Comirnaty (n = 7) or the viral vector vaccine Vaxzevria (n = 6). Treatment modalities included corticosteroids (n = 13), Anakinra (n = 5), IVIGs (n = 5), and etoposide (n = 2). Eight patients underwent combination treatment. Three of 16 patients died. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 vaccines may occasionally trigger HLH, and Anakinra may be an efficacious treatment option for this condition.

12.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0260487, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581781

ABSTRACT

At the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) designed, manufactured, and distributed the CDC 2019-Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Real-Time RT-PCR Diagnostic Panel for SARS-CoV-2 detection. The diagnostic panel targeted three viral nucleocapsid gene loci (N1, N2, and N3 primers and probes) to maximize sensitivity and to provide redundancy for virus detection if mutations occurred. After the first distribution of the diagnostic panel, state public health laboratories reported fluorescent signal in the absence of viral template (false-positive reactivity) for the N3 component and to a lesser extent for N1. This report describes the findings of an internal investigation conducted by the CDC to identify the cause(s) of the N1 and N3 false-positive reactivity. For N1, results demonstrate that contamination with a synthetic template, that occurred while the "bulk" manufactured materials were located in a research lab for quality assessment, was the cause of false reactivity in the first lot. Base pairing between the 3' end of the N3 probe and the 3' end of the N3 reverse primer led to amplification of duplex and larger molecules resulting in false reactivity in the N3 assay component. We conclude that flaws in both assay design and handling of the "bulk" material, caused the problems with the first lot of the 2019-nCoV Real-Time RT-PCR Diagnostic Panel. In addition, within this study, we found that the age of the examined diagnostic panel reagents increases the frequency of false positive results for N3. We discuss these findings in the context of improvements to quality control, quality assurance, and assay validation practices that have since been improved at the CDC.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , DNA Primers , False Positive Reactions , Humans , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Hepatology ; 74(SUPPL 1):317A, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1508765

ABSTRACT

Background: In patients infected with the SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) virus, obesity is associated with an increase in hospital admission, use of mechanical ventilation and patient mortality. Elevated liver fat, body mass index (BMI) and male sex are significant predictors of hospitalisation risk following COVID-19. BMI, however, is a poor indicator of body fat distribution. Here, we aim to characterise body composition and liver health through multiparametric magnetic resonance (mpMR) and compare participants hospitalised and not hospitalised following COVID-19. Methods: Participants with laboratory confirmed or clinically suspected SARSCoV-2 infection were recruited to the COVERSCAN study (NCT04369807) and underwent a multi-organ mpMR scan (median time from initial symptom = 177 days). Measures of liver fat (PDFF), liver fibroinflammation (cT1) and body composition (VAT, subcutaneous adipose tissue [SAT], skeletal muscle index [SMI]) were analysed. Differences between hospitalised (n=60) and non-hospitalised participants (n=354) were assessed using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed on all biomarkers to assess the risk of hospitalisation. Presented data are median values. Results: Hospitalised participants were older (50yrs vs 43yrs;p<0.01) and had significantly elevated liver fat (3.5% vs 2.4%;p<0.01) and liver cT1 (734ms vs 708ms;p<0.01). Though hospitalised participants had a significantly elevated BMI (27kg/m2 vs 25kg/m2;p=0.011), it was VAT, but not SAT or SMI, that was significantly elevated in hospitalised participants (131cm2 vs 80 cm2;p<0.01). Univariate analysis revealed male sex, advanced age and elevated BMI, VAT, liver fat and liver cT1 were all significantly predictive of hospitalisation. In multivariate analysis, only age remained significantly predictive of hospitalisation. In obese participants, VAT and liver fat, but not BMI nor cT1, remained significantly elevated in hospitalised participants (VAT: 200cm2 vs 159cm2, p=0.041;liver fat: 9.8% vs 4.6%, p=0.012). Conclusion: mpMR revealed significantly elevated visceral and ectopic liver fat in hospitalised participants following COVID-19 infection. In obese participants, BMI was not significantly different in hospitalised and non-hospitalised patients whereas visceral and liver fat remained significantly elevated. Our work highlights body fat distribution as an important consideration for COVID-19 risk profiling which is not sufficiently evaluated based on BMI alone.

14.
Dtsch Med Wochenschr ; 146(13-14): 908-910, 2021 Jul.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493269

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 continues to challenge health-care systems and ICUs around the globe more than one year into the pandemic and in spite of all advances in diagnosis and treatment of the disease caused by the novel SARS-CoV-2. Many open questions remain concerning optimal medical therapy, respiratory management and resource allocation, particuly in times of limited available health care personell. In the following short article, we summarized current knowlegde on management of COVID-19 in the ICU.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Critical Care , Intensive Care Units , Humans , Intensive Care Units/standards , Intensive Care Units/trends
15.
Journal of the American College of Surgeons ; 233(5):S116, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1466550

ABSTRACT

Introduction: COVID-19 has created experiential barriers for surgical learners to interact at the bedside for teaching/case presentations. We hypothesized that an international Grand Rounds using the Microsoft HoloLens2 extended reality (XR) headset creates an improved bedside-learning experience compared with traditional Grand Rounds formats. Methods: In December 2020, we hosted (through partnership with the University of Michigan and Imperial College of London) the world’s first International Grand Rounds experience using the HoloLens2 XR headset broadcasting transatlantic bedside rounding on 3 complex surgical patients to an international audience of 154 faculty, residents, and medical trainees. Participants completed qualitative pre- and post-event surveys. Results: Of the 154 participants, 96 (62%) completed pre-surveys and 70 (45%) completed both the pre-and post-surveys. Respondents (average age 39.3 years [43% women;57% men;80 US;16 UK]) included 30 medical students, 30 faculty, 7 residents, and 29 hospital administrators. Pre-event survey: 76% had little or no experience before with XR devices;92% thought development/implementation of XR medical curricula was valuable;and 96% felt tele-rounding using XR technology was important for the current era. Post survey: 98% respondents thought the ability to visualize bedside clinical findings, imaging, and lab-tests via XR rounding was highly valuable and this novel XR international Grand Rounds format was superior to traditional Grand Rounds. Conclusion: Almost all (98%) participants in the world’s first International Grand Rounds on a Mixed Reality Headset felt this immersive extended reality virtual experience allowed visualization of clinical findings, imaging, and labs at the patient’s bedside and was superior to a traditional Grand Rounds format.

16.
Anaesthesia ; 76(11): 1546-1547, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455502
17.
International Journal of Obstetric Anesthesia ; 46, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1333478

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Airway management guidelines recommend the preoxygenation of obstetric patients to an end-tidal oxygen (etO2) concentration of 90% or more prior to general anaesthesia. A previous study showed that despite a plausible role for high-flow humidified nasal oxygen (HFNO) in this context, only 60% of participants achieved this target after t hree minutes of HFNO.1 This was vastly lower than reported rates with face mask (FM) oxygen. We conducted a randomised controlled crossover trial to determine if HFNO is non-inferior to FM oxygen for increasing etO2 concentration after simulated preoxygenation of women in late pregnancy (gestational age [Formula presented]6 weeks). Methods: After ethics approval, trial registration and consent, 70 women underwent simulated preoxygenation protocols with HFNO and FM oxygen sequentially. They were randomised to receive HFNO first then FM oxygen or vice versa. Baseline variables were measured before each protocol including etO2 concentration to ensure adequate oxygen washout between protocols. Protocols were three minutes long and conducted with the women in a ramped position and left lateral tilt. HFNO was delivered at highest tolerable flow rate with a maximum of 70 L/min and FM oxygen was delivered at 10 L/min. The primary outcome was first etO2 concentration after each protocol with a chosen non-inferiority margin of 5%. Recruitment occurred prior to COVID-19 pandemic restrictions. Results: 70 women were randomised. 62 women completed the study protocols without complications. Eight women were excluded due to technical faults or incomplete protocols. Participant characteristics were age (mean ± SD, 34.7 ± 4.6 years) and body mass index (BMI) (median (IQR), 28.5 (26.6–32.4 kg/m2). First etO2 concentration after HFNO protocol was non-inferior to first etO2 concentration after FM oxygen protocol (mean difference, 1.45;95% CI, 0.19–2.72;two-tailed [Formula presented]value, 0.025). 71% of participants achieved first etO2 concentration of [Formula presented]0% after the HFNO protocol versus 43.5% after the FM protocol. There was no evidence of correlation between first etO2 concentration after either modality and BMI or gestation. First etO2 concentration after HFNO was weakly correlated to percentage of time of mouth closure (Pearson’s coefficient, 0.287). First etO2 concentration after FM oxygen was moderately correlated to respiratory rate in the final protocol minute and minute ventilation (Pearson’s coefficient, 0.426 and 0.339 respectively). Discussion: HFNO was non-inferior to FM oxygen for increasing etO2 concentration after simulated preoxygenation of women in late pregnancy. These results suggest that HFNO may be a suitable alternative to FM oxygen for preoxygenation of pregnant women prior to general anaesthesia. Disclosure: Fisher & Paykel Healthcare provided equipment for this trial.

18.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 9682, 2021 05 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219072

ABSTRACT

The need for high-affinity, SARS-CoV-2-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is critical in the face of the global COVID-19 pandemic, as such reagents can have important diagnostic, research, and therapeutic applications. Of greatest interest is the ~ 300 amino acid receptor binding domain (RBD) within the S1 subunit of the spike protein because of its key interaction with the human angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (hACE2) receptor present on many cell types, especially lung epithelial cells. We report here the development and functional characterization of 29 nM-affinity mouse SARS-CoV-2 mAbs created by an accelerated immunization and hybridoma screening process. Differing functions, including binding of diverse protein epitopes, viral neutralization, impact on RBD-hACE2 binding, and immunohistochemical staining of infected lung tissue, were correlated with variable gene usage and sequence.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Serological Testing , Epitopes/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunization , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Models, Molecular , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
19.
Air Med J ; 40(3): 170-174, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1131044

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Limited information exists regarding the response of helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) programs to patients with known or suspected coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The purpose of this study was to determine changes in flight operations during the early stages of the pandemic. METHODS: A survey of the American College of Emergency Physicians Air Medical Section was conducted between May 13, 2020, and August 1, 2020. COVID-19 prevalence was defined as high versus low based on cases > 2,500 or ≤ 2,500. RESULTS: Of the 48 respondents, the majority (89.6%) reported that their patient guidelines had changed because of COVID-19; 89.6% of programs reported transporting COVID-19-positive patients, whereas 91.5% reported transporting persons under investigation. The majority of respondents reported additional training in COVID-19 airway management (79.2%) and personal protective equipment use (93.6%). Permitted aerosol-generating procedures included bilevel positive airway pressure (40.4%) and high-flow nasal oxygen (66.0%). No difference in guideline changes, positive COVID-19/persons under investigation transport restrictions, or permitted aerosol-generating procedures were noted between high- and low-prevalence settings. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 has resulted in changes to HEMS guidelines regardless of local disease prevalence. The pandemic has persisted sufficiently long that data regarding the effectiveness of guideline changes should be analyzed. In the absence of definitive data, national best practices should be developed to guide COVID-19 HEMS transport.


Subject(s)
Air Ambulances/statistics & numerical data , Aircraft/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Emergency Medical Services/statistics & numerical data , Transportation of Patients/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
20.
Telemed J E Health ; 27(10): 1151-1159, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1054250

ABSTRACT

Background: Owing to the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been a large shift in health care toward virtual platforms. This study analyzed patient and physician satisfaction with telehealth during the height of the pandemic within the division of sports medicine. Methods: All sports medicine patients who completed a telemedicine visit from March 30, 2020, through April 30, 2020, were sent a 14-question Likert scale (1-5/5) survey. Sports medicine physicians who used telemedicine were sent a separate 14-question Likert scale (1-5/5) survey at the end of the study period. Factors influencing patient satisfaction were determined using a multivariate linear regression model. Results: A total of 143 patients and 9 sports medicine attendings completed the surveys. Most patients were "satisfied" (4/5) or "very satisfied" (5/5) (88.8%). A multivariate linear regression determined that patients who believed they had a greater ability to adopt new technology and were more effective at communicating questions/concerns to their physicians had greater satisfaction (p = 0.009 and p = 0.015, respectively). Most physicians were either "satisfied" (4/5) or "very satisfied" (5/5) (75.0%). On average, physicians felt that physical examinations conducted through telemedicine were "moderately effective" (2.75/5.00 ± 1.3), that they were "fairly confident" (3.86/5.00 ± 0.83) in their diagnoses, and that most sports medicine attendings plan to use telemedicine in the future (87.5%). Conclusion: Telehealth emerged as a valuable tool for the delivery of health care to sports medicine patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. Patients and physicians reported high levels of satisfactions with its use, and this study further identifies areas that can improve the patient and physician experience.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians , Sports Medicine , Telemedicine , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Satisfaction , Personal Satisfaction , SARS-CoV-2
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