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1.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-320481

ABSTRACT

Background: Re-allocation of resources during the COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in delays in care delivery to patients with cardiovascular disease and cancer. The ability of health care providers to provide optimal care in this setting has not been formally evaluated. Objectives: To assess the impact of COVID-19 resource re-allocation on scheduling, testing, elective procedures, telemedicine access, use of new COVID-19 therapies, and providers’ opinions on healthcare policies among oncology and cardiology practitioners. Methods: An electronic survey was conducted by a cardio-oncology collaborative network through regional and state chapters of the American College of Cardiology , American Society of Clinical Oncology, and the International Cardio-Oncology Society. Descriptive statistics were reported by frequency and proportion for analyses, and stratified categorically by geographic region and specialty. Results: 1,415 providers (43 countries) participated: 986 cardiologists, 306 oncologists, and 118 trainees/internal medicine. 63% (195/306) of oncologists vs 92% (896/976) of cardiologists reported cancellations of treatments/elective procedures (p=0.01). 46% (442/970) of cardiologists and 25% (76/303) of oncologists modified the scope of their practice (p=<0.001). Academic physicians (74.5%) felt better supplied with personal protective equipment (PPE) vs non-academic (74.5% vs 67.2%;p=0.018). Telemedicine was less common in Europe 81% (74/91), and Latin America 64% (101/158), than the United States, 88% (950/1,097) (p=<0.001). 95% of all groups supported more active leadership from medical professional societies. Conclusions: These results support initiatives to promote expanded coverage for telemedicine, increased access to PPE, better testing availability and involvement of medical professional societies to help with preparedness for future health care crisis.Appendix: Link to the Survey : https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/C8ZDYNW

2.
BMJ ; 375: e066588, 2021 12 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1560914

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of remote proactive management of toxicities during chemotherapy for early stage breast cancer. DESIGN: Pragmatic, cluster randomised trial. SETTING: 20 cancer centres in Ontario, Canada, allocated by covariate constrained randomisation to remote management of toxicities or routine care. PARTICIPANTS: All patients starting adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemotherapy for early stage breast cancer at each centre. 25 patients from each centre completed patient reported outcome questionnaires. INTERVENTIONS: Proactive, standardised, nurse led telephone management of common toxicities at two time points after each chemotherapy cycle. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome, cluster level mean number of visits to the emergency department or admissions to hospital per patient during the whole course of chemotherapy treatment, was evaluated with routinely available administrative healthcare data. Secondary patient reported outcomes included toxicity, self-efficacy, and quality of life. RESULTS: Baseline characteristics of participants were similar in the intervention (n=944) and control arms (n=1214); 22% were older than 65 years. Penetration (that is, the percentage of patients who received the intervention at each centre) was 50-86%. Mean number of visits to the emergency department or admissions to hospital per patient was 0.91 (standard deviation 0.28) in the intervention arm and 0.94 (0.40) in the control arm (P=0.94); 47% (1014 of 2158 patients) had at least one visit to the emergency department or a hospital admission during chemotherapy. Among 580 participants who completed the patient reported outcome questionnaires, at least one grade 3 toxicity was reported by 48% (134 of 278 patients) in the intervention arm and by 58% (163 of 283) in the control arm. No differences in self-efficacy, anxiety, or depression were found. Compared with baseline, the functional assessment of cancer therapy trial outcome index decreased by 6.1 and 9.0 points in the intervention and control participants, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Proactive, telephone based management of toxicities during chemotherapy did not result in fewer visits to the emergency department or hospital admissions. With the rapid rise in remote care because of the covid-19 pandemic, identifying scalable strategies for remote management of patients during cancer treatment is particularly relevant. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02485678.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/administration & dosage , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Monitoring, Ambulatory/methods , Outpatients , Telemedicine , Telephone , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , Breast Neoplasms/psychology , COVID-19 , Chemotherapy, Adjuvant/adverse effects , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Ontario , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Treatment Outcome
3.
Curr Oncol Rep ; 23(8): 99, 2021 07 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1309080

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To give an overview of the role of social media (SoMe) in cardio-oncology during the COVID-19 pandemic. RECENT FINDINGS: SoMe has been critical in fostering education, outreach, awareness, collaboration, dissemination of information, and advocacy in cardio-oncology. This has become increasingly evident during the COVID-19 pandemic, during which SoMe has helped share best practices, community, and research focused on the impact of COVID-19 in cardiology and hematology/oncology, with cardio-oncology at the interface of these two subspecialty fields. A strength of SoMe is the ability to amplify a message in real-time, globally, with minimal investment of resources. This has been particularly beneficial for the emerging field of cardio-hematology/cardio-oncology, a field focused on the interplay of cancer and cardiovascular disease. SoMe field especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. We illustrate how social media has supported innovation (including telemedicine), amplification of healthcare workers' voice, and illumination of pre-existing and continued health disparities within the field of cardio-oncology during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Neoplasms/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Social Media/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Cardiovascular Diseases/virology , Humans , Information Dissemination , Neoplasms/virology
5.
Cardiooncology ; 6(1): 28, 2020 Nov 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-949102

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Re-allocation of resources during the COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in delays in care delivery to patients with cardiovascular disease and cancer. The ability of health care providers to provide optimal care in this setting has not been formally evaluated. OBJECTIVES: To assess the impact of COVID-19 resource re-allocation on scheduling, testing, elective procedures, telemedicine access, use of new COVID-19 therapies, and providers' opinions on healthcare policies among oncology and cardiology practitioners. METHODS: An electronic survey was conducted by a cardio-oncology collaborative network through regional and state chapters of the American College of Cardiology, American Society of Clinical Oncology, and the International Cardio-Oncology Society. Descriptive statistics were reported by frequency and proportion for analyses, and stratified categorically by geographic region and specialty. RESULTS: One thousand four hundred fifteen providers (43 countries) participated: 986 cardiologists, 306 oncologists, and 118 trainees/internal medicine. 63% (195/306) of oncologists vs 92% (896/976) of cardiologists reported cancellations of treatments/elective procedures (p = 0.01). 46% (442/970) of cardiologists and 25% (76/303) of oncologists modified the scope of their practice (p = < 0.001). Academic physicians (74.5%) felt better supplied with personal protective equipment (PPE) vs non-academic (74.5% vs 67.2%; p = 0.018). Telemedicine was less common in Europe 81% (74/91), and Latin America 64% (101/158), than the United States, 88% (950/1097) (p = < 0.001). 95% of all groups supported more active leadership from medical professional societies. CONCLUSIONS: These results support initiatives to promote expanded coverage for telemedicine, increased access to PPE, better testing availability and involvement of medical professional societies to help with preparedness for future health care crisis.

6.
J Natl Cancer Inst ; 113(5): 513-522, 2021 05 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-920710

ABSTRACT

In response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the Cardio-Oncology and Imaging Councils of the American College of Cardiology offers recommendations to clinicians regarding the cardiovascular care of cardio-oncology patients in this expert consensus statement. Cardio-oncology patients-individuals with an active or prior cancer history and with or at risk of cardiovascular disease-are a rapidly growing population who are at increased risk of infection, and experiencing severe and/or lethal complications by COVID-19. Recommendations for optimizing screening and monitoring visits to detect cardiac dysfunction are discussed. In addition, judicious use of multimodality imaging and biomarkers are proposed to identify myocardial, valvular, vascular, and pericardial involvement in cancer patients. The difficulties of diagnosing the etiology of cardiovascular complications in patients with cancer and COVID-19 are outlined, along with weighing the advantages against risks of exposure, with the modification of existing cardiovascular treatments and cardiotoxicity surveillance in patients with cancer during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cardiotoxicity/therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Diagnostic Imaging/methods , Neoplasms/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Cardiotoxicity/diagnosis , Cardiotoxicity/virology , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis , Cardiovascular Diseases/virology , Expert Testimony , Humans , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Neoplasms/virology
7.
CA Cancer J Clin ; 70(6): 480-504, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-750753

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has given rise to a pandemic of unprecedented proportions in the modern era because of its highly contagious nature and impact on human health and society: coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Patients with cardiovascular (CV) risk factors and established CV disease (CVD) are among those initially identified at the highest risk for serious complications, including death. Subsequent studies have pointed out that patients with cancer are also at high risk for a critical disease course. Therefore, the most vulnerable patients are seemingly those with both cancer and CVD, and a careful, unified approach in the evaluation and management of this patient population is especially needed in times of the COVID-19 pandemic. This review provides an overview of the unique implications of the viral outbreak for the field of cardio-oncology and outlines key modifications in the approach to this ever-increasing patient population. These modifications include a shift toward greater utilization of cardiac biomarkers and a more focused CV imaging approach in the broader context of modifications to typical practice pathways. The goal of this strategic adjustment is to minimize the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection (or other future viral outbreaks) while not becoming negligent of CVD and its important impact on the overall outcomes of patients who are being treated for cancer.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/therapy , Anthracyclines/adverse effects , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Humans , Proteasome Inhibitors/adverse effects , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Radiotherapy/adverse effects , Receptor, ErbB-2/antagonists & inhibitors , Referral and Consultation , SARS-CoV-2 , Trastuzumab/adverse effects
8.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 9(19): e017787, 2020 10 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-680409

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has emerged as a global pandemic and public health crisis. Increasing waves of intermittent infectious outbreaks have dramatically influenced care among broad populations. Over the past 2 decades, there has been a rapid increase in cancer survival, with >400 000 new survivors each year. The increasingly common presence of cardiovascular disease in patients during or after cancer treatment led to the rapid growth of the field of cardio-oncology with a mandate of identifying, treating, and preventing the various forms of cardiovascular disease seen among this population. This review evaluates the implications of the pandemic on the practice and study of cardio-oncology. The evolving understanding of the relationship between comorbid disease and clinical outcomes among this population is assessed. With the impetus of the pandemic, cardio-oncology can be deliberate in embracing changes to cardiac screening, monitoring, and intervention during oncology care. Bridging 2 specialties, consideration of the lessons learned in cancer and cardiovascular may pivotally inform ongoing therapeutic efforts. Further, the development of multicenter registries focused on understanding and optimizing outcomes among these patients should be considered. Together, these insights may critically inform strategies for the care of cardio-oncology patients in future phases of the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Medical Oncology , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Public Health , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Global Health , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Survival Rate/trends
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