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1.
J Neurosurg Sci ; 2022 Apr 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1789848

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, a multitude of surveys have analyzed the impact virus spreading on the everyday medical practice, including neurosurgery. However, none have examined the perceptions of neurosurgeons towards the pandemic, their life changes, and the strategies they implemented to be able to deal with their patients in such a difficult time. METHODS: From April 2021 to May 2021 a modified Delphi method was used to construct, pilot, and refine the questionnaire focused on the evolution of global neurosurgical practice during the pandemic. This survey was distributed among 1000 neurosurgeons; the responses were then collected and critically analyzed. RESULTS: Outpatient department practices changed with a rapid rise in teleservices. 63.9% of respondents reported that they have changed their OT practices to emergency cases with occasional elective cases. 40.0% of respondents and 47.9% of their family members reported to have suffered from COVID-19. 56.2% of the respondents reported having felt depressed in the last 1 year. 40.9% of respondents reported having faced financial difficulties. 80.6% of the respondents found online webinars to be a good source of learning. 47.8% of respondents tried to improve their neurosurgical knowledge while 31.6% spent the extra time in research activities. CONLCUSIONS: Progressive increase in operative waiting lists, preferential use of telemedicine, reduction in tendency to complete stoppage of physical clinic services and drop in the use of PPE kits were evident. Respondents' age had an impact on how the clinical services and operative practices have evolved. Financial concerns overshadow mental health.

3.
J Neurosci Rural Pract ; 11(4): 514-516, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-990053
4.
World Neurosurg ; 148: e197-e208, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-989401

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has been at its peak for the past 8 months and has affected more than 215 countries around the world. India is now the second most-affected nation with more than 48,000,000 cases and 79,000 deaths. Despite this, and the fact that it is a lower-middle-income nation, the number of deaths is almost one third that of the United States and one half that of Brazil. However, there has been no experience published from non-COVID-19-designated hospitals, where the aim is to manage noninfected cases with neurosurgical ailments while keeping the number of infected cases to a minimum. METHODS: We analyzed the number of neurosurgical cases (nontrauma) done in the past 5 months (March-July 2020) in our institute, which is the largest neurosurgical center by volume in southern India, and compared the same to the concurrent 5 months in 2019 and 5 months preceding the pandemic. We also reviewed the total number of cases infected with COVID-19 managed during this time. RESULTS: We operated a total of 630 cases (nontrauma) in these 5 months and had 9 COVID-19 infected cases operated during this time. There was a 57% (P = 0.002) reduction in the number of cases operated as compared with the same 5 months in the preceding year. We employed a dual strategy of rapid antigen testing and surgery for cases needing emergency intervention and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction test for elective cases. The hospital was divided into 3 zones (red, orange, and green) depending on infectivity level with minimal interaction. Separate teams were designated for each zone, and thus we were able to effectively manage even infected cases despite the absence of pulmonology/medical specialists. CONCLUSIONS: We present a patient management protocol for non-COVID-19-designated hospitals in high-volume centers with the constraints of a lower-middle-income nation and demonstrate its effectiveness. Strict zoning targeted testing and effective triage can help in management during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Neurosurgical Procedures/trends , Telemedicine/trends , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Ambulatory Care/trends , Aneurysm, Ruptured/surgery , Brain Neoplasms/surgery , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , COVID-19 Serological Testing , Cerebrovascular Disorders/surgery , Humans , India/epidemiology , Infection Control , Intracranial Aneurysm/surgery , Neural Tube Defects/surgery , Patient Selection , Personal Protective Equipment , Radiosurgery , SARS-CoV-2 , Spinal Diseases , Spinal Injuries
5.
Neurol India ; 68(5): 1008-1011, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-895443

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The world is in the midst of the COVID crisis, which has forced the neurosurgical community to change its practices. OBJECTIVE: To advocate the necessary adaptations in radio surgical practices to effectively manage the radio surgical patients, resource utilization, and protecting the healthcare provider during the COVID pandemic. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In addition to the literature review, pertinent recommendations are made in respect to the gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS). RESULTS: Every patient presenting to GKRS treatment should be considered as a potential asymptomatic COVID carrier. Patients should be categorized based on the priority (urgent, semi-urgent, or elective) on the basis of pathological and clinical status. The only urgent indication is a non-responding or enlarging cerebral metastasis. There is a high risk of aerosol dispersion during gamma radiation delivery in the gamma gantry. CONCLUSION: These recommendations should be used to minimize the chances of pathogenic exposure to the patient and caregivers both.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Radiosurgery , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
6.
Neurosurgery ; 87(4): 854-856, 2020 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-641027

ABSTRACT

Even though neurosurgeons exercise these enormous and versatile skills, the COVID-19 pandemic has shaken the fabrics of the global neurosurgical family, jeopardizing human lives, and forcing the entire world to be locked down. We stand on the shoulders of the giants and will not forget their examples and their teachings. We will work to the best of our ability to honor their memory. Professor Harvey Cushing said: "When to take great risks; when to withdraw in the face of unexpected difficulties; whether to force an attempted enucleation of a pathologically favorable tumor to its completion with the prospect of an operative fatality, or to abandon the procedure short of completeness with the certainty that after months or years even greater risks may have to be faced at a subsequent session-all these require surgical judgment which is a matter of long experience." It is up to us, therefore, to keep on the noble path that we have decided to undertake, to accumulate the surgical experience that these icons have shown us, the fruit of sacrifice and obstinacy. Our tribute goes to them; we will always remember their excellent work and their brilliant careers that will continue to enlighten all of us.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/history , Neurosurgery/history , Pandemics/history , Pneumonia, Viral/history , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , History, 21st Century , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Neurol India ; 68(4): 774-791, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-732745

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Severe acute respiratory syndrome, coronavirus 2 (SARS-COV 2) has inexplicably and irreversibly changed the way of neurosurgery practice. There has been a substantial reduction in neurosurgical operations during the period of lockdown. The lockdown might be the most effective measure to curtail viral transmission. Once we return to the normalization of the lifestyle, there will be a backlog of unoperated pending cases along with the possibility of further spread of the coronavirus. METHODS: We reviewed the available literature and protocols for neurosurgical practice in different geographic locations. We drafted a consensus statement based on the literature and protocols suggested by the World Health Organization (WHO) and various professional societies to prevent the spread of SARS-COV2 while streamlining the neurosurgical practice. RESULTS: The consensus statement suggests the patient triage, workflow, resource distribution, and operational efficacy for care providers at different stages of management. The priority is set at personal protection while ensuring patients' safety, timely management, and capacity building. We performed a detailed subsection analysis for the management of trauma and set up for COVID-free hospitals for simultaneous management of routine neurosurgical indications. In this time of medicolegal upheaval, special consent from the patients should be taken in view of the chances of delay in management and the added risk of corona infection. The consensus statements are applicable to neurosurgical setups of all capacities. CONCLUSION: Along with the glaring problem of infection, there is another threat of neurosurgery emergency building up. This wave may overwhelm the already stretched systems to the hilt. We need to flatten this curve while avoiding contagion. These measures may guide neurosurgery practitioners to effectively manage patients ensuring the safety of caregivers and care seekers both.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Consensus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Neurosurgery , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , COVID-19 , Caregivers , Coronavirus Infections/surgery , Humans , Neurosurgery/methods , Neurosurgical Procedures , Pneumonia, Viral/surgery , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Stereotact Funct Neurosurg ; 98(5): 358-360, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-711083
9.
J Neurosci Rural Pract ; 11(3): 474-477, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-696609

ABSTRACT

Neurotrauma is a critical public health problem that deserves the attention of the world health community. The unprecedented pandemic of SARS-COV 2 has led to a tremendous strain on medical facilities including intensive care and availability of blood products. In addition, due to lockdown in most nations and diverting of medical attention elsewhere, neurotrauma has taken a back seat. Despite this, any case of trauma presenting during this time should receive the best possible care. However, it is also imperative to safeguard the health care workers from this infection, too. The number of health care workers losing their lives to this infection is ever rising. We here present a possible workflow using a checklist approach such that errors and cross-infections are minimized and there is no reduction in the level of care received by any trauma case. This article has been written with a special focus on middle-income countries where resources may already be strained due to the sudden case burden. We hope to minimize death "caused" by COVID-19 and "related" to it.

10.
World Neurosurg ; 142: e396-e406, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-644655

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has changed the practice of neurosurgery. Significant resources have been dedicated to the disease. The pandemic in the Indian subcontinent, compared with the rest of the world, is relatively delayed. The neurosurgical practice cannot remain unaffected by hugely disruptive measures such as a lockdown. The inevitable increase in COVID infections with the gradual relaxation of lockdown continues to pose a risk for health care providers. Therefore, it is imperative to evaluate whether the pandemic has had a discernible effect on health care providers, especially in terms of practice modifications in private establishments and publicly funded hospitals, the emotional impact on the surgeon, and the influence of social media on the psyche of the surgeon. METHODS: An online questionnaire-based survey was prepared, with questions related to the COVID-specific themes of precautions taken in outpatient services and operating theaters, the influence of social media, the economic loss incurred, and the perceptible impact of telemedicine and webinars. The links to the survey were mailed to neurosurgeons in private and public practice countrywide. The responses were anonymized to ensure free and unbiased answers to the survey questions. RESULTS: A total of 176 responses were received from across the Indian subcontinent. The median age of respondents was 39 years (range, 32-70 years) and the postresidency experience was 7 years (range, 0-34 years). Respondents were an equitable mix of public and private practitioners. Of respondents, 46% were practicing restricted outpatient services, more in public institutions (P = 0.22) which also had a higher incidence of tele-outpatient services (26% vs. 17%). Wearing surgical masks, N95 masks, and gloves were the most commonly practiced precautionary measures in outpatient services (>60%). Although private practitioners were continuing elective cases (40%), public institutes were more cautious, with only emergency patients being operated on (29%). The greatest fear among all practitioners was passing the infection to their family (75%). Social media were helpful for brainstorming queries and updating practice modifications, but some surgeons admitted to receiving threats on social media platforms (37.5%). Depression and economic losses were palpable for approximately 30% neurosurgeons. CONCLUSIONS: The survey highlights the perception of neurosurgeons toward the pandemic and the difference in public-private practice. Suspension of elective procedures, severe curtailment of regular outpatient appointments, drastic modifications of the normal outpatient department/operating room practices, and apprehensions related to inadequacy of safety provided by personal protective equipment use and financial losses of private establishments were some of the visible themes in our survey results. Although telemedicine has not been as widely adopted as expected, online education has been favorably received.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care , Coronavirus Infections , Elective Surgical Procedures , Neurosurgeons , Neurosurgical Procedures , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Professional Practice , Telemedicine , Academic Medical Centers , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Depression , Economics , Hospitals, Private , Hospitals, Public , Humans , India , Middle Aged , Neurosurgery , Personal Protective Equipment , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Media , Surveys and Questionnaires
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