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1.
Front Cell Infect Microbiol ; 11: 783961, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1630423

ABSTRACT

The global coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has demonstrated the range of disease severity and pathogen genomic diversity emanating from a singular virus (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, SARS-CoV-2). This diversity in disease manifestations and genomic mutations has challenged healthcare management and resource allocation during the pandemic, especially for countries such as India with a bigger population base. Here, we undertake a combinatorial approach toward scrutinizing the diagnostic and genomic diversity to extract meaningful information from the chaos of COVID-19 in the Indian context. Using methods of statistical correlation, machine learning (ML), and genomic sequencing on a clinically comprehensive patient dataset with corresponding with/without respiratory support samples, we highlight specific significant diagnostic parameters and ML models for assessing the risk of developing severe COVID-19. This information is further contextualized in the backdrop of SARS-CoV-2 genomic features in the cohort for pathogen genomic evolution monitoring. Analysis of the patient demographic features and symptoms revealed that age, breathlessness, and cough were significantly associated with severe disease; at the same time, we found no severe patient reporting absence of physical symptoms. Observing the trends in biochemical/biophysical diagnostic parameters, we noted that the respiratory rate, total leukocyte count (TLC), blood urea levels, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were directly correlated with the probability of developing severe disease. Out of five different ML algorithms tested to predict patient severity, the multi-layer perceptron-based model performed the best, with a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) score of 0.96 and an F1 score of 0.791. The SARS-CoV-2 genomic analysis highlighted a set of mutations with global frequency flips and future inculcation into variants of concern (VOCs) and variants of interest (VOIs), which can be further monitored and annotated for functional significance. In summary, our findings highlight the importance of SARS-CoV-2 genomic surveillance and statistical analysis of clinical data to develop a risk assessment ML model.

2.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 10(1)2021 Dec 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580341

ABSTRACT

This study elucidated the clinical, humoral immune response and genomic analysis of vaccine breakthrough (VBT) infections after ChAdOx1 nCoV-19/Covishield vaccine in healthcare workers (HCWs). Amongst 1858 HCWs, 1639 had received either two doses (1346) or a single dose (293) of ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine. SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies and neutralizing antibodies were measured in the vaccinated group and the development of SARS-CoV-2 infection was monitored.Forty-six RT-PCR positive samples from the 203 positive samples were subjected to whole genome sequencing (WGS). Of the 203 (10.92%) infected HCWs, 21.46% (47/219) were non-vaccinated, which was significantly more than 9.52% (156/1639) who were vaccinated and infection was higher in doctors and nurses. Unvaccinated HCWs had 1.57 times higher risk compared to partially vaccinated HCWs and 2.49 times higher risk than those who were fully vaccinated.The partially vaccinated were at higher risk than the fully vaccinated (RR 1.58). Antibody non-response was seen in 3.44% (4/116), low antibody levels in 15.51% (18/116) and medium levels were found in 81.03% (94/116). Fully vaccinated HCWs had a higher antibody response at day 42 than those who were partially vaccinated (8.96 + 4.00 vs. 7.17 + 3.82). Whole genome sequencing of 46 samples revealed that the Delta variant (B.1.617.2) was predominant (69.5%). HCWs who had received two doses of vaccine showed better protection from mild, moderate, or severe infection, with a higher humoral immune response than those who had received a single dose. The genomic analysis revealed the predominance of the Delta variant (B.1.617.2) in the VBT infections.

3.
Preprint in English | Other preprints | ID: ppcovidwho-295504

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant was first identified in the state of Maharashtra in late 2020 and spread throughout India, outcompeting pre-existing lineages including B.1.617.1 (Kappa) and B.1.1.7 (Alpha). In vitro , B.1.617.2 is 6-fold less sensitive to serum neutralising antibodies from recovered individuals, and 8-fold less sensitive to vaccine-elicited antibodies as compared to wild type Wuhan-1 bearing D614G. Serum neutralising titres against B.1.617.2 were lower in ChAdOx-1 versus BNT162b2 vaccinees. B.1.617.2 spike pseudotyped viruses exhibited compromised sensitivity to monoclonal antibodies against the receptor binding domain (RBD) and N-terminal domain (NTD), in particular to the clinically approved bamlavinimab and imdevimab monoclonal antibodies. B.1.617.2 demonstrated higher replication efficiency in both airway organoid and human airway epithelial systems as compared to B.1.1.7, associated with B.1.617.2 spike being in a predominantly cleaved state compared to B.1.1.7. Additionally we observed that B.1.617.2 had higher replication and spike mediated entry as compared to B.1.617.1, potentially explaining B.1.617.2 dominance. In an analysis of over 130 SARS-CoV-2 infected healthcare workers across three centres in India during a period of mixed lineage circulation, we observed substantially reduced ChAdOx-1 vaccine efficacy against B.1.617.2 relative to non-B.1.617.2. Compromised vaccine efficacy against the highly fit and immune evasive B.1.617.2 Delta variant warrants continued infection control measures in the post-vaccination era.

4.
Front Immunol ; 12: 738093, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518484

ABSTRACT

Disease caused by SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus (COVID-19) led to significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. A systemic hyper-inflammation characterizes severe COVID-19 disease, often associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Blood biomarkers capable of risk stratification are of great importance in effective triage and critical care of severe COVID-19 patients. Flow cytometry and next-generation sequencing were done on peripheral blood cells and urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR), and cytokines were measured from and mass spectrometry-based proteomics was done on plasma samples from an Indian cohort of COVID-19 patients. Publicly available single-cell RNA sequencing data were analyzed for validation of primary data. Statistical analyses were performed to validate risk stratification. We report here higher plasma abundance of suPAR, expressed by an abnormally expanded myeloid cell population, in severe COVID-19 patients with ARDS. The plasma suPAR level was found to be linked to a characteristic plasma proteome, associated with coagulation disorders and complement activation. Receiver operator characteristic curve analysis to predict mortality identified a cutoff value of suPAR at 1,996.809 pg/ml (odds ratio: 2.9286, 95% confidence interval 1.0427-8.2257). Lower-than-cutoff suPAR levels were associated with a differential expression of the immune transcriptome as well as favorable clinical outcomes, in terms of both survival benefit (hazard ratio: 0.3615, 95% confidence interval 0.1433-0.912) and faster disease remission in our patient cohort. Thus, we identified suPAR as a key pathogenic circulating molecule linking systemic hyperinflammation to the hypercoagulable state and stratifying clinical outcomes in severe COVID-19 patients with ARDS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Receptors, Urokinase Plasminogen Activator/blood , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Blood Coagulation Disorders/blood , Blood Coagulation Disorders/immunology , Blood Proteins/analysis , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokines/blood , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/immunology , Middle Aged , Myeloid Cells/immunology , Proteome/analysis , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
5.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 737007, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1399153

ABSTRACT

Background: Post infection immunity and post vaccination immunity both confer protection against COVID-19. However, there have been many whole genome sequencing proven reinfections and breakthrough infections. Both are most often mild and caused by Variants of Concern (VOC). Methods: The patient in our study underwent serial COVID-19 RT-PCR, blood tests for serology, acute phase reactants, and chest imaging as part of clinical care. We interviewed the patient for clinical history and retrieved reports and case papers. We retrieved stored RT-PCR positive samples for whole genome sequencing (WGS) of SARS-CoV-2 from the patient's breakthrough infections and the presumed index case. Findings: The patient had three RT-PCR confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infections. Two breakthrough infections occurred in quick succession with the first over 3 weeks after complete vaccination with COVISHIELD and despite post-vaccination seroconversion. The first breakthrough infection was due to the Alpha variant and the second due to the Delta variant. The Delta variant infection resulted in hypoxia, hospitalization, and illness lasting seven weeks. Serial serology, acute phase reactants, and chest imaging supported WGS in establishing distinct episodes of infection. WGS established a fully vaccinated family member as the index case. Interpretation: The patient had an Alpha variant breakthrough infection despite past infection, complete vaccination, and seroconversion. Despite boosting after this infection, the patient subsequently had a severe Delta variant breakthrough infection. This was also a WGS proven reinfection and, therefore, a case of breakthrough reinfection. The patient acquired the infection from a fully vaccinated family member.

6.
Nature ; 599(7883): 114-119, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392870

ABSTRACT

The B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) was first identified in the state of Maharashtra in late 2020 and spread throughout India, outcompeting pre-existing lineages including B.1.617.1 (Kappa) and B.1.1.7 (Alpha)1. In vitro, B.1.617.2 is sixfold less sensitive to serum neutralizing antibodies from recovered individuals, and eightfold less sensitive to vaccine-elicited antibodies, compared with wild-type Wuhan-1 bearing D614G. Serum neutralizing titres against B.1.617.2 were lower in ChAdOx1 vaccinees than in BNT162b2 vaccinees. B.1.617.2 spike pseudotyped viruses exhibited compromised sensitivity to monoclonal antibodies to the receptor-binding domain and the amino-terminal domain. B.1.617.2 demonstrated higher replication efficiency than B.1.1.7 in both airway organoid and human airway epithelial systems, associated with B.1.617.2 spike being in a predominantly cleaved state compared with B.1.1.7 spike. The B.1.617.2 spike protein was able to mediate highly efficient syncytium formation that was less sensitive to inhibition by neutralizing antibody, compared with that of wild-type spike. We also observed that B.1.617.2 had higher replication and spike-mediated entry than B.1.617.1, potentially explaining the B.1.617.2 dominance. In an analysis of more than 130 SARS-CoV-2-infected health care workers across three centres in India during a period of mixed lineage circulation, we observed reduced ChAdOx1 vaccine effectiveness against B.1.617.2 relative to non-B.1.617.2, with the caveat of possible residual confounding. Compromised vaccine efficacy against the highly fit and immune-evasive B.1.617.2 Delta variant warrants continued infection control measures in the post-vaccination era.


Subject(s)
Immune Evasion , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Virus Replication/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Cell Fusion , Cell Line , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , India , Kinetics , Male , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Vaccination
7.
Pathogens ; 10(9)2021 Aug 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1390714

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) manifests a broad spectrum of clinical presentations, varying in severity from asymptomatic to mortality. As the viral infection spread, it evolved and developed into many variants of concern. Understanding the impact of mutations in the SARS-CoV-2 genome on the clinical phenotype and associated co-morbidities is important for treatment and preventionas the pandemic progresses. Based on the mild, moderate, and severe clinical phenotypes, we analyzed the possible association between both, the clinical sub-phenotypes and genomic mutations with respect to the severity and outcome of the patients. We found a significant association between the requirement of respiratory support and co-morbidities. We also identified six SARS-CoV-2 genome mutations that were significantly correlated with severity and mortality in our cohort. We examined structural alterations at the RNA and protein levels as a result of three of these mutations: A26194T, T28854T, and C25611A, present in the Orf3a and N protein. The RNA secondary structure change due to the above mutations can be one of the modulators of the disease outcome. Our findings highlight the importance of integrative analysis in which clinical and genetic components of the disease are co-analyzed. In combination with genomic surveillance, the clinical outcome-associated mutations could help identify individuals for priority medical support.

8.
Front Microbiol ; 12: 653399, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389208

ABSTRACT

Co-infection with ancillary pathogens is a significant modulator of morbidity and mortality in infectious diseases. There have been limited reports of co-infections accompanying SARS-CoV-2 infections, albeit lacking India specific study. The present study has made an effort toward elucidating the prevalence, diversity and characterization of co-infecting respiratory pathogens in the nasopharyngeal tract of SARS-CoV-2 positive patients. Two complementary metagenomics based sequencing approaches, Respiratory Virus Oligo Panel (RVOP) and Holo-seq, were utilized for unbiased detection of co-infecting viruses and bacteria. The limited SARS-CoV-2 clade diversity along with differential clinical phenotype seems to be partially explained by the observed spectrum of co-infections. We found a total of 43 bacteria and 29 viruses amongst the patients, with 18 viruses commonly captured by both the approaches. In addition to SARS-CoV-2, Human Mastadenovirus, known to cause respiratory distress, was present in a majority of the samples. We also found significant differences of bacterial reads based on clinical phenotype. Of all the bacterial species identified, ∼60% have been known to be involved in respiratory distress. Among the co-pathogens present in our sample cohort, anaerobic bacteria accounted for a preponderance of bacterial diversity with possible role in respiratory distress. Clostridium botulinum, Bacillus cereus and Halomonas sp. are anaerobes found abundantly across the samples. Our findings highlight the significance of metagenomics based diagnosis and detection of SARS-CoV-2 and other respiratory co-infections in the current pandemic to enable efficient treatment administration and better clinical management. To our knowledge this is the first study from India with a focus on the role of co-infections in SARS-CoV-2 clinical sub-phenotype.

9.
Front Microbiol ; 12: 664386, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1323083

ABSTRACT

Human host and pathogen interaction is dynamic in nature and often modulated by co-pathogens with a functional role in delineating the physiological outcome of infection. Co-infection may present either as a pre-existing pathogen which is accentuated by the introduction of a new pathogen or may appear in the form of new infection acquired secondarily due to a compromised immune system. Using diverse examples of co-infecting pathogens such as Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Hepatitis C Virus, we have highlighted the role of co-infections in modulating disease severity and clinical outcome. This interaction happens at multiple hierarchies, which are inclusive of stress and immunological responses and together modulate the disease severity. Already published literature provides much evidence in favor of the occurrence of co-infections during SARS-CoV-2 infection, which eventually impacts the Coronavirus disease-19 outcome. The availability of biological models like 3D organoids, mice, cell lines and mathematical models provide us with an opportunity to understand the role and mechanism of specific co-infections. Exploration of multi-omics-based interactions across co-infecting pathogens may provide deeper insights into their role in disease modulation.

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