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2.
Lung India ; 39(3): 292-300, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1810865

ABSTRACT

A 63-year-old man presented with fever and breathlessness during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. He was diagnosed to have severe COVID-19 pneumonia. He was treated with oxygen, noninvasive ventilation, and glucocorticoids. He improved over 5 weeks and was shifted out of the intensive care unit. Subsequently, he experienced worsening during hospitalization with refractory hypoxemia and shock and finally succumbed to his illness. An autopsy was performed. Herein, we have presented a clinical discussion on the possible causes of the patient's fatal outcome followed by the autopsy findings.

3.
Lung India ; 39(3): 254-260, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1810864

ABSTRACT

Background: Little data exist on antifibrotic drugs for treating symptomatic patients with persistent interstitial lung abnormalities in the postacute phase of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Herein, we describe the physician practices of prescribing pirfenidone and nintedanib for these patients and the physician-assessed response. Materials and Methods: This was a multicenter, retrospective survey study of subjects administered pirfenidone or nintedanib for post-COVID-19 interstitial lung abnormalities. Data on the demographic details, comorbidities, abnormalities on the computed tomography (CT) of the chest, treatment, antifibrotic drug use, and physician-assessed response were collected on a standard case record pro forma. We explored physician practices of prescribing antifibrotics (primary objective) and the physician-assessed response (secondary objective). Results: We included 142 subjects (mean age, 55.9 years; 16.2% women) at eight centers. The most common abnormalities on CT chest included ground glass opacities (75.7%), consolidation (49.5%), reticulation (43.9%), and parenchymal bands (16.8%). Of the 5701 patients discharged after hospitalization at six centers, 115 (2.0%) received antifibrotics. The drugs were prescribed an average of 26 days after symptom onset. One hundred and sixteen subjects were administered pirfenidone; 11 (9.5%) received the full dose (2400 mg/day). Thirty subjects were prescribed nintedanib; 23 (76.7%) received the full dose (300 mg/day). Of 76 subjects with available information, 27 (35.6%) and 26 (34.2%) had significant or partial radiologic improvement, respectively, according to the physician's assessment. Conclusions: Antifibrotic agents were administered to a minority of patients discharged after recovery from acute COVID-19 pneumonia. Larger, randomized studies on the efficacy and safety of these agents are required.

4.
5.
Indian J Crit Care Med ; 26(3): 403-404, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742858

ABSTRACT

Muthu V, Sehgal IS, Dhooria S, Prasad KT, Aggarwal AN, Agarwal R. Corticosteroids for Non-severe COVID-19: Primum Non Nocere. Indian J Crit Care Med 2022;26(3):403-404.

10.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0259006, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480463

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The proportion of COVID-19 patients having active pulmonary tuberculosis, and its impact on COVID-19 related patient outcomes, is not clear. We conducted this systematic review to evaluate the proportion of patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis among COVID-19 patients, and to assess if comorbid pulmonary tuberculosis worsens clinical outcomes in these patients. METHODS: We queried the PubMed and Embase databases for studies providing data on (a) proportion of COVID-19 patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis or (b) severe disease, hospitalization, or mortality among COVID-19 patients with and without active pulmonary tuberculosis. We calculated the proportion of tuberculosis patients, and the relative risk (RR) for each reported outcome of interest. We used random-effects models to summarize our data. RESULTS: We retrieved 3,375 citations, and included 43 studies, in our review. The pooled estimate for proportion of active pulmonary tuberculosis was 1.07% (95% CI 0.81%-1.36%). COVID-19 patients with tuberculosis had a higher risk of mortality (summary RR 1.93, 95% CI 1.56-2.39, from 17 studies) and for severe COVID-19 disease (summary RR 1.46, 95% CI 1.05-2.02, from 20 studies), but not for hospitalization (summary RR 1.86, 95% CI 0.91-3.81, from four studies), as compared to COVID-19 patients without tuberculosis. CONCLUSION: Active pulmonary tuberculosis is relatively common among COVID-19 patients and increases the risk of severe COVID-19 and COVID-19-related mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Hospitalization , SARS-CoV-2 , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/mortality , Humans , Risk Factors , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/virology
11.
Respir Care ; 66(12): 1912-1923, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1444437

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We conducted this systematic review to evaluate whether asthma increases the risk of severe disease and adverse outcomes among subjects with COVID-19. METHODS: We queried the PubMed and Embase databases for studies indexed through December 2020. We included studies providing data on severe disease, hospitalization, ICU care, need for mechanical ventilation, or mortality among subjects with COVID-19 with and without asthma. We calculated the relative risk for each reported outcome of interest and used random effects modeling to summarize the data. RESULTS: We retrieved 1,832 citations, and included 90 studies, in our review. Most publications reported data retrieved from electronic records of retrospective subject cohorts. Only 25 studies were judged to be of high quality. Subjects with asthma and COVID-19 had a marginally higher risk of hospitalization (summary relative risk 1.13, 95% CI 1.03-1.24) but not for severe disease (summary relative risk 1.17, 95% CI 0.62-2.20), ICU admission (summary relative risk 1.13, 95% CI 0.96-1.32), mechanical ventilation (summary relative risk 1.05, 95% CI 0.85-1.29), or mortality (summary relative risk 0.92, 95% CI 0.82-1.04) as compared to subjects with COVID-19 without asthma. CONCLUSIONS: Comorbid asthma increases risk of COVID-19-related hospitalization but not severe disease or other adverse outcomes in subjects with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Asthma , COVID-19 , Asthma/complications , Hospitalization , Humans , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Lung India ; 38(5): 498-499, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1395124
13.
Int J Gen Med ; 14: 2491-2506, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282362

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is an ongoing pandemic with many challenges that are now extending to its intriguing long-term sequel. 'Long-COVID-19' is a term given to the lingering or protracted illness that patients of COVID-19 continue to experience even in their post-recovery phase. It is also being called 'post-acute COVID-19', 'ongoing symptomatic COVID-19', 'chronic COVID-19', 'post COVID-19 syndrome', and 'long-haul COVID-19'. Fatigue, dyspnea, cough, headache, brain fog, anosmia, and dysgeusia are common symptoms seen in Long-COVID-19, but more varied and debilitating injuries involving pulmonary, cardiovascular, cutaneous, musculoskeletal and neuropsychiatric systems are also being reported. With the data on Long-COVID-19 still emerging, the present review aims to highlight its epidemiology, protean clinical manifestations, risk predictors, and management strategies. With the re-emergence of new waves of SARS-CoV-2 infection, Long-COVID-19 is expected to produce another public health crisis on the heels of current pandemic. Thus, it becomes imperative to emphasize this condition and disseminate its awareness to medical professionals, patients, the public, and policymakers alike to prepare and augment health care facilities for continued surveillance of these patients. Further research comprising cataloging of symptoms, longer-ranging observational studies, and clinical trials are necessary to evaluate long-term consequences of COVID-19, and it warrants setting-up of dedicated, post-COVID care, multi-disciplinary clinics, and rehabilitation centers.

14.
J Bronchology Interv Pulmonol ; 28(2): e26-e28, 2021 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1254910

Subject(s)
Bronchoscopy , Humans
15.
Lung India ; 38(Supplement): S105-S115, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1123963

ABSTRACT

During the times of the ongoing COVID pandemic, aerosol-generating procedures such as bronchoscopy have the potential of transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 to the healthcare workers. The decision to perform bronchoscopy during the COVID pandemic should be taken judiciously. Over the years, the indications for bronchoscopy in the clinical practice have expanded. Experts at the Indian Association for Bronchology perceived the need to develop a concise statement that would assist a bronchoscopist in performing bronchoscopy during the COVID pandemic safely. The current Indian Association for Bronchology Consensus Statement provides specific guidelines including triaging, indications, bronchoscopy area, use of personal protective equipment, patient preparation, sedation and anesthesia, patient monitoring, bronchoscopy technique, sample collection and handling, bronchoscope disinfection, and environmental disinfection concerning the coronavirus disease-2019 situation. The suggestions provided herewith should be adopted in addition to the national bronchoscopy guidelines that were published recently. This statement summarizes the essential aspects to be considered for the performance of bronchoscopy in COVID pandemic, to ensure safety for both for patients and healthcare personnel.

17.
Indian J Crit Care Med ; 24(6): 485-486, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-806074

ABSTRACT

How to cite this article: Sehgal IS, Yaddanapudi LN, Dhooria S, Thurai Prasad K, Puri GD, Muthu V, et al. Barrier Protection during Airway Intubation. Indian J Crit Care Med 2020;24(6):485-486.

18.
Front Public Health ; 8: 382, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-732829

ABSTRACT

Pandemics like the coronavirus disease (COVID)-19 can cause a significant strain on the healthcare system. Healthcare organizations must be ready with their contingency plans for managing many patients with contagious infectious disease. Ideally, every large hospital should have a facility that can function as a high-level isolation unit. An isolation unit ensures that the healthcare staff and the hospital are equipped to deal with infectious disease outbreaks. Unfortunately, such facilities do not exist in several hospitals, especially in resource-limited settings. In such a scenario, healthcare setups need to convert their existing general structure into an infectious disease facility. Herein, we describe our experience in transforming a general hospital into a functional infectious disease isolation unit.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitals, General/organization & administration , Communicable Disease Control , Hospital Administration , Humans , Pandemics
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