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1.
Pathol Res Pract ; 225: 153552, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440296

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by severe vascular remodelling, resulting in increased pulmonary vascular resistance with cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. However, the diagnosis of PAH is often inaccurate. Many cases of PAH are incorrectly diagnosed or missed, and they are often associated with death. The aim of this study was to verify the morphological and histological criteria of fatal cases of PAH and evaluate the lymphocytic populations associated to lesions with reactive neo-angiogenesis. METHODS: Pulmonary lung sections from 10 cases of sudden unexpected death (SUD) in the absence of previously diagnosed diseases and in an apparent state of well-being, with final histological post autopsy diagnosis of PAH were collected. The pathological findings were compared using ten controls from non-pathological lung from deaths from other causes. The autopsies included 4 males (40%) and 6 females (60%) with an average age of 52.1 ± 10.1 years. Sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) were revised for a morphological diagnosis. Subsequently, serial sections were performed and stained with immunohistochemistry for anti-CD20 (B-lymphocytes), anti-CD3 (T-lymphocytes), anti-CD4 (T-helper lumphocytes), anti-CD8 (T-cytotoxic lymphocytes) and anti-CD117/C-Kit (mast cells/MCs) to detect inflammatory infiltrate and different ratios of cell-type. Statistical analysis was conducted using a paired t-test looking at 100 cells in 3 different tissue samples representative of vascular lesion and 3 different random normal lung parenchyma fields without lesion (from 10 normal control lungs), to identify specific lymphocyte subpopulations in inflammatory infiltrates. RESULTS: There was a significant percentage increase of CD20 (p < 0.001), CD8 (p = 0.002), CD4 (p < 0.001), and CD117/C-Kit positive (C-Kit+; p < 0.001) cells mainly detected around wall vessels; while increased MCs positivity and C-Kit+ were observed especially in alveolar septa. In addition, reactive angiomatosis was observed. CONCLUSIONS: The inflammatory infiltrate should be included for a correct diagnosis of PAH besides the vascular remodelling. The inflammatory infiltrate seems to be implicated as a main factor in the pathogenesis. This finding is important to rule out secondary pulmonary hypertension, to identify SUDs of unknown causes and to add new elements to the literature that can explain the immunologically related pathogenesis of PAH.


Subject(s)
B-Lymphocytes/pathology , Lung/pathology , Mast Cells/pathology , Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension/pathology , T-Lymphocytes/pathology , Adult , Autopsy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
2.
Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep ; 21(9): 44, 2021 06 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1283813

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is a global health challenge. This review aims to summarize the incidence, risk factors, possible pathophysiology, and proposed management of neurological manifestations of post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection (PASC) or neuro-PASC based on the published literature. RECENT FINDINGS: The National Institutes of Health has noted that PASC is a multi-organ disorder ranging from mild symptoms to an incapacitating state that can last for weeks or longer following recovery from initial infection with SARS-CoV-2. Various pathophysiological mechanisms have been proposed as the culprit for the development of PASC. These include, but are not limited to, direct or indirect invasion of the virus into the brain, immune dysregulation, hormonal disturbances, elevated cytokine levels due to immune reaction leading to chronic inflammation, direct tissue damage to other organs, and persistent low-grade infection. A multidisciplinary approach for the treatment of neuro-PASC will be required to diagnose and address these symptoms. Tailored rehabilitation and novel cognitive therapy protocols are as important as pharmacological treatments to treat neuro-PASC effectively. With recognizing the growing numbers of COVID-19 patients suffering from neuro-PASC, there is an urgent need to identify affected individuals early to provide the most appropriate and efficient treatments. Awareness among the general population and health care professionals about PASC is rising, and more efforts are needed to understand and treat this new emerging challenge. In this review, we summarize the relevant scientific literature about neuro-PASC.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Brain , COVID-19/complications , Humans , United States
3.
Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep ; 21(3): 9, 2021 02 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1080528

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The present review discusses the peripheral nervous system (PNS) manifestations associated with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). RECENT FINDINGS: Nerve pain and skeletal muscle injury, Guillain-Barré syndrome, cranial polyneuritis, neuromuscular junction disorders, neuro-ophthalmological disorders, neurosensory hearing loss, and dysautonomia have been reported as PNS manifestations in patients with COVID-19. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causes COVID-19. COVID-19 has shown syndromic complexity. Not only does SARS-CoV-2 affect the central nervous system but also it involves the PNS. The PNS involvement may be due to dysregulation of the immune system attributable to COVID-19. Here we review the broad spectrum of PNS involvement of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Guillain-Barre Syndrome , Nervous System Diseases , Central Nervous System , Humans , Peripheral Nervous System , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(4)2021 02 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1060776

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Neuroinvasive properties of SARS-CoV-2 have allowed the hypothesis of several pathogenic mechanisms related to acute and chronic neurological sequelae. However, neuropathological correlates have been poorly systematically investigated, being retrieved from reports of single case or limited case series still. METHODS: A PubMed search was carried out to review all publications on autopsy in subjects with "COronaVIrus Disease-19" (COVID-19). Among them, we focused on histological findings of the brain, which were compared with those from the authors' autoptic studies performed in some COVID-19 patients. RESULTS: Only seven studies reported histological evidence of brain pathology in patients deceased for COVID-19, including three with reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction evidence of viral infection. All these studies, in line with our experience, showed vascular-related and infection-related secondary inflammatory tissue damage due to an abnormal immune response. It is still unclear, however, whether these findings are the effect of a direct viral pathology or rather reflect a non-specific consequence of cardiovascular and pulmonary disease on the brain. CONCLUSIONS: Notwithstanding the limited evidence available and the heterogeneity of the studies, we provide a preliminary description of the relationship between SARS-CoV-2 and brain sequelae. Systematic autoptic investigations are needed for accurate detection and adequate management of these patients.


Subject(s)
Brain/pathology , COVID-19/complications , Nervous System Diseases/virology , Autopsy , Humans , Nervous System Diseases/pathology
6.
Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep ; 20(12): 66, 2020 Nov 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-921776

ABSTRACT

The original version contained incorrect formatting of Dr. Napolis. His first name should be Mario and his last name should be Di Napoli.

7.
Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep ; 20(12): 60, 2020 10 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-893338

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become a global health crisis of our time. The disease arises from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) that binds to angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptors on host cells for its internalization. COVID-19 has a wide range of respiratory symptoms from mild to severe and affects several other organs, increasing the complexity of the treatment. There is accumulating evidence to suggest that SARS-CoV-2 can target the nervous system. In this review, we provide an account of the COVID-19 central nervous system (CNS) manifestations. RECENT FINDINGS: A broad spectrum of the CNS manifestations including headache, impaired consciousness, delirium, loss of smell and taste, encephalitis, seizures, strokes, myelitis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, neurogenic respiratory failure, encephalopathy, silent hypoxemia, generalized myoclonus, neuroleptic malignant syndrome and Kawasaki syndrome has been reported in patients with COVID-19. CNS manifestations associated with COVID-19 should be considered in clinical practice. There is a need for modification of current protocols and standing orders to provide better care for COVID-19 patients presenting with neurological symptoms.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Coronavirus , Nervous System Diseases , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , COVID-19 , Humans , Nervous System Diseases/virology , SARS-CoV-2
8.
J Neurol Sci ; 416: 117013, 2020 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-629733

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Current evidence on the association between COVID-19 and dementia is sparse. This study aims to investigate the associations between COVID-19 caseload and the burden of dementia. METHODS: We gathered data regarding burden of dementia (disability-adjusted life years [DALYs] per 100,000), life expectancy, and healthy life expectancy (HALE) from the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) 2017 study. We obtained COVID-19 data from Our World in Data database. We analyzed the association of COVID-19 cases and deaths with the burden of dementia using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. RESULTS: Globally, we found significant positive (p < .001) correlations between life expectancy (r = 0.60), HALE (r = 0.58), and dementia DALYs (r = 0.46) with COVID-19 caseloads. Likewise, we found similar correlations between life expectancy (r = 0.60), HALE (r = 0.58) and dementia DALYs (r = 0.54) with COVID-19 mortality. CONCLUSION: Health policymakers should clarify a targeted model of disease surveillance in order to reduce the dual burden of dementia and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Dementia/epidemiology , Age Distribution , Cause of Death , Comorbidity , Databases, Factual , Global Burden of Disease , Humans , Pandemics
9.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 29(9): 105089, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-614222

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The interaction between coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and non-communicable diseases may increase the global burden of disease. We assessed the association of COVID-19 with ageing and non-communicable diseases. METHODS: We extracted data regarding non-communicable disease, particularly cardiovascular disease, deaths, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), and healthy life expectancy (HALE) from the Global Burden of Disease Study (GBD) 2017. We obtained data of confirmed COVID-19 cases, deaths, and tests from the Our World in Data database as of May 28, 2020. Potential confounders of pandemic outcomes analyzed include institutional lockdown delay, hemispheric geographical location, and number of tourists. We compared all countries according to GBD classification and World Bank income level. We assessed the correlation between independent variables associated with COVID-19 caseload and mortality using Spearman's rank correlation and adjusted mixed model analysis. FINDINGS: High-income had the highest, and the Southeast Asia, East Asia, and Oceania region had the least cases per million population (3050.60 vs. 63.86). Sub-saharan region has reported the lowest number of COVID-19 mortality (1.9). Median delay to lockdown initiation varied from one day following the first case in Latin America and Caribbean region, to 34 days in Southeast Asia, East Asia, and Oceania. Globally, non-communicable disease DALYs were correlated with COVID-19 cases (r = 0.32, p<0.001) and deaths (r = 0.37, p<0.001). HALE correlated with COVID-19 cases (r = 0.63, p<0.001) and deaths (r = 0.61, p<0.001). HALE was independently associated with COVID-19 case rate and the number of tourists was associated with COVID-19 mortality in the adjusted model. INTERPRETATION: Preventive measures against COVID-19 should protect the public from the dual burden of communicable and non-communicable diseases, particularly in the elderly. In addition to active COVID-19 surveillance, policymakers should utilize this evidence as a guide for prevention and coordination of health services. This model is timely, as many countries have begun to reduce social isolation.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Global Health , Noncommunicable Diseases/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Cause of Death , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cost of Illness , Databases, Factual , Female , Health Services Needs and Demand , Health Status Disparities , Healthcare Disparities , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Incidence , Infection Control , Male , Middle Aged , Needs Assessment , Noncommunicable Diseases/mortality , Noncommunicable Diseases/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prognosis , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors
10.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 29(8): 104941, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-380483

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is a global health threat. Some COVID-19 patients have exhibited widespread neurological manifestations including stroke. Acute ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis have been reported in patients with COVID-19. COVID-19-associated coagulopathy is increasingly recognized as a result of acute infection and is likely caused by inflammation, including inflammatory cytokine storm. Recent studies suggest that axonal transport of SARS-CoV-2 to the brain can occur via the cribriform plate adjacent to the olfactory bulb that may lead to symptomatic anosmia. The internalization of SARS-CoV-2 is mediated by the binding of the spike glycoprotein of the virus to the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) on cellular membranes. ACE2 is expressed in several tissues including lung alveolar cells, gastrointestinal tissue, and brain. The aim of this review is to provide insights into the clinical manifestations and pathophysiological mechanisms of stroke in COVID-19 patients. SARS-CoV-2 can down-regulate ACE2 and, in turn, overactivate the classical renin-angiotensin system (RAS) axis and decrease the activation of the alternative RAS pathway in the brain. The consequent imbalance in vasodilation, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, and thrombotic response may contribute to the pathophysiology of stroke during SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Brain/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Encephalitis, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Stroke/physiopathology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Blood Coagulation , Brain/metabolism , Brain/virology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Encephalitis, Viral/epidemiology , Encephalitis, Viral/metabolism , Encephalitis, Viral/virology , Host Microbial Interactions , Humans , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Oxidative Stress , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Renin-Angiotensin System , SARS-CoV-2 , Signal Transduction , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/metabolism , Stroke/virology , Vasodilation , Virulence
11.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 29(9): 104938, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-210006

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-Cov-2), now named coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), may change the risk of stroke through an enhanced systemic inflammatory response, hypercoagulable state, and endothelial damage in the cerebrovascular system. Moreover, due to the current pandemic, some countries have prioritized health resources towards COVID-19 management, making it more challenging to appropriately care for other potentially disabling and fatal diseases such as stroke. The aim of this study is to identify and describe changes in stroke epidemiological trends before, during, and after the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This is an international, multicenter, hospital-based study on stroke incidence and outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic. We will describe patterns in stroke management, stroke hospitalization rate, and stroke severity, subtype (ischemic/hemorrhagic), and outcomes (including in-hospital mortality) in 2020 during COVID-19 pandemic, comparing them with the corresponding data from 2018 and 2019, and subsequently 2021. We will also use an interrupted time series (ITS) analysis to assess the change in stroke hospitalization rates before, during, and after COVID-19, in each participating center. CONCLUSION: The proposed study will potentially enable us to better understand the changes in stroke care protocols, differential hospitalization rate, and severity of stroke, as it pertains to the COVID-19 pandemic. Ultimately, this will help guide clinical-based policies surrounding COVID-19 and other similar global pandemics to ensure that management of cerebrovascular comorbidity is appropriately prioritized during the global crisis. It will also guide public health guidelines for at-risk populations to reduce risks of complications from such comorbidities.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Hospitalization/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/therapy , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Healthcare Disparities/trends , Hospital Mortality/trends , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Incidence , Interrupted Time Series Analysis , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prospective Studies , Registries , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/mortality , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
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