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1.
BMJ Open ; 12(11): e062382, 2022 Nov 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2137735

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to describe the epidemiology and outcome of patients hospitalised during the COVID-19 pandemic in intensive cardiac care units (ICCs). DESIGN: Non-interventional, retrospective and prospective, nationwide study. SETTING: 109 private or public ICCs in Italy. PARTICIPANTS: 6054 consecutive patients admitted to Italian ICCs during COVID-19 pandemic. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: To obtain accurate and up-to-date information on epidemiology and outcome of patients admitted to ICCs during the COVID-19 pandemic, the impact that the COVID-19 infection may have determined on the organisational pathways and in-hospital management of the various clinical conditions being admitted to ICCs. RESULTS: Acute coronary syndromes were the most frequent ICC discharge diagnoses followed by heart failure and hypokinetic arrhythmias. The prevalence of COVID-19 positivity was approximately 3%. Most patients with a COVID-19 diagnosis at discharge (52%) arrived to ICC from other wards, in particular 22% from non-cardiology ICCs. The overall mortality was 4.2% during ICC and 5.8% during hospital stay. The cause of in-hospital death was cardiac in 74.4% of the cases, non-cardiovascular in 13.5%, vascular in 5.8% and related to COVID-19 in 6.3% of the patients. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides a unique nationwide picture of current ICC care during COVID-19 pandemic. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04744415.

3.
Eur Heart J Suppl ; 23(Suppl C): C154-C163, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1377966

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic represents an unprecedented event that has brought deep changes in hospital facilities with reshaping of the health system organization, revealing inadequacies of current hospital and local health systems. When the COVID-19 emergency will end, further evaluation of the national health system, new organization of acute wards, and a further evolution of the entire health system will be needed to improve care during the chronic phase of disease. Therefore, new standards for healthcare personnel, more efficient organization of hospital facilities for patients with acute illnesses, improvement of technological approaches, and better integration between hospital and territorial services should be pursued. With experience derived from the COVID-19 pandemic,new models, paradigms, interventional approaches, values and priorities should be suggested and implemented.

4.
G Ital Cardiol (Rome) ; 22(8): 610-619, 2021 Aug.
Article in Italian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325472

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic represents an unprecedented event that has brought deep changes in hospital facilities with reshaping of the health system organization, revealing inadequacies of current hospital and local health systems. When the COVID-19 emergency will end, further evaluation of the national health system, new organization of acute wards, and a further evolution of the entire health system will be needed to improve care during the chronic phase of disease. Therefore, new standards for healthcare personnel, more efficient organization of hospital facilities for patients with acute illnesses, improvement of technological approaches, and better integration between hospital and territorial services should be pursued. With experience derived from the COVID-19 pandemic, new models, paradigms, interventional approaches, values and priorities should be suggested and implemented.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiology/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Health Personnel/organization & administration , Humans , Italy , National Health Programs/organization & administration
5.
BMJ Open ; 11(5): e043239, 2021 05 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1234300

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to identify the guiding ethical principles that should be considered for critical resource allocation during pandemic emergency situations, and especially for the COVID-19 outbreak. The secondary objective was to define the priority to be assigned to each principle. SETTING: The study was conducted from March to June 2020 within the context of an ethical committee (EC) in Northern Italy. PARTICIPANTS: Eleven EC members and five additional external healthcare and bioethical professionals, forming a multidisciplinary panel, took part in the study. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: The compilation of a list of ethical principles (maximum of 10 items) and their priority ranking and application within an emergency pandemic context was established as the expected outcome of this work. RESULTS: A consensus on 10 guiding ethical principles was reached by the multidisciplinary panel. Transparency ranked first on the priority list as the most frequently voted principle, followed by the number of lives saved, life-years saved, respect for individuals' autonomy and equity. Other principles including life cycle, 'sickest first', reciprocity, instrumental value and lottery were also considered appropriate as potential tiebreakers. These principles were discussed and made consistent with the current Italian pandemic context by producing an explanatory document. CONCLUSIONS: The identified principles could be used in preparedness plans to guide resource allocation during pandemic events. By combining their rank and relevance in relation to disease, health system organisations, social and economic settings, and critical resources at risk of scarcity, these principles could help to maximise the benefit of resource use for the community, thus reducing inequalities for individuals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Triage
7.
G Ital Cardiol (Rome) ; 22(3): 188-192, 2021 Mar.
Article in Italian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1123715

ABSTRACT

The dramatic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic extends beyond the risk of deaths related to virus infection. Excess deaths from other causes, particularly cardiovascular deaths, have been reported worldwide. Our study based on administrative databases of the Emilia-Romagna region demonstrates a 17% excess of out-of-hospital cardiac deaths in the first 2020 semester with a peak of +62% on April. The excess of cardiac deaths may be explained by the indirect consequences of the response to the COVID-19 pandemic. These include a dramatic reduction of hospital admissions during the pandemic, particularly for acute coronary syndromes; an increase of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests; a reduction of outpatient clinic activities and cardiac procedures; long-term cardiovascular effects of COVID-19; and unfavorable cardiac effects of the lockdown imposed by the spread of COVID-19 infection. The knowledge of the indirect consequences of COVID-19 pandemic is important for planning cardiologic strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Acute Coronary Syndrome/epidemiology , Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Humans , Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest/epidemiology
9.
Am J Cardiovasc Drugs ; 20(6): 559-570, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-910261

ABSTRACT

In patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the prevalence of pre-existing cardiovascular diseases is elevated. Moreover, various features, also including pro-thrombotic status, further predispose these patients to increased risk of ischemic cardiovascular events. Thus, the identification of optimal antithrombotic strategies in terms of the risk-benefit ratio and outcome improvement in this setting is crucial. However, debated issues on antithrombotic therapies in patients with COVID-19 are multiple and relevant. In this article, we provide ten questions and answers on risk stratification and antiplatelet/anticoagulant treatments in patients at risk of/with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection based on the scientific evidence gathered during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/pharmacology , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Thrombosis/etiology , Thrombosis/prevention & control , Age Factors , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/pharmacology , Anticoagulants/administration & dosage , Anticoagulants/classification , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Atrial Fibrillation/drug therapy , Chemoprevention/adverse effects , Chemoprevention/methods , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/drug therapy , Drug Interactions , Humans , Italy , Pandemics , Risk Factors , Risk Management , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Sex Factors , Thrombosis/drug therapy , Thrombosis/physiopathology
11.
Int J Cardiol ; 318: 160-164, 2020 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-623475

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease, affecting ~9 million people in the past five months and causing >460,000 deaths worldwide, is completely new to mankind. More than 2,000 research projects registered at ClinTrials.gov are aiming at finding effective treatments for rapid transfer to clinical practice. Unfortunately, just few studies have a sufficiently valid design to provide reliable information for clinical practice.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Clinical Trials as Topic , Coronavirus Infections , Drug Repositioning/methods , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Therapies, Investigational/methods , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Clinical Trials as Topic/methods , Clinical Trials as Topic/organization & administration , Clinical Trials as Topic/standards , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Italy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Research , Research Design , SARS-CoV-2
14.
G Ital Cardiol (Rome) ; 21(7): 489-501, 2020 Jul.
Article in Italian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-611791

ABSTRACT

Given the high prevalence of preexisting cardiovascular diseases and the increased incidence of adverse cardiovascular events in patients hospitalized for SARS-CoV-2 infection, the identification of optimal antithrombotic approaches in terms of risk/benefit ratio and outcome improvement appears crucial in this setting. In the present position paper we collected current evidence from the literature to provide practical recommendations on the management of antithrombotic therapies (antiplatelet and anticoagulant) in various clinical contexts prevalent during the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak: in-home management of oral anticoagulant therapy; interactions between drugs used in the SARS-CoV-2 infection and antithrombotic agents; in-hospital management of antithrombotic therapies; diagnosis, risk stratification and treatment of in-hospital thrombotic complications.


Subject(s)
Atherosclerosis/drug therapy , Atherosclerosis/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks/statistics & numerical data , Fibrinolytic Agents/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Thrombosis/drug therapy , Atherosclerosis/diagnosis , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Evidence-Based Medicine , Female , Humans , Incidence , Italy , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombosis/diagnosis , Thrombosis/epidemiology , Treatment Outcome
16.
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