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1.
Cell Reports ; : 110799, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1800157

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY Although vaccines and monoclonal antibody countermeasures have reduced the morbidity and mortality associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection, variants with constellations of mutations in the spike gene jeopardize their efficacy. Accordingly, antiviral interventions that are resistant to further virus evolution are needed. The host-derived cytokine IFN-λ has been proposed as a possible treatment based on studies in human COVID-19 patients. Here, we show IFN-λ protects against SARS-CoV-2 B.1.351 (Beta) and B.1.1.529 (Omicron) variants in three strains of conventional and human ACE2 transgenic mice. Prophylaxis or therapy with nasally-delivered IFN-λ2 limited infection of historical or variant SARS-CoV-2 strains in the upper and lower respiratory tracts without causing excessive inflammation. In the lung, IFN-λ was produced preferentially in epithelial cells and acted on radio-resistant cells to protect against of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Thus, inhaled IFN-λ may have promise as a treatment for evolving SARS-CoV-2 variants that develop resistance to antibody-based countermeasures.

2.
Cell Rep ; 38(12): 110561, 2022 03 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1797095

ABSTRACT

Eliciting antibodies to surface-exposed viral glycoproteins can generate protective responses that control and prevent future infections. Targeting conserved sites may reduce the likelihood of viral escape and limit the spread of related viruses with pandemic potential. Here we leverage rational immunogen design to focus humoral responses on conserved epitopes. Using glycan engineering and epitope scaffolding in boosting immunogens, we focus murine serum antibody responses to conserved receptor binding motif (RBM) and receptor binding domain (RBD) epitopes following severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) spike imprinting. Although all engineered immunogens elicit a robust SARS-CoV-2-neutralizing serum response, RBM-focusing immunogens exhibit increased potency against related sarbecoviruses, SARS-CoV, WIV1-CoV, RaTG13-CoV, and SHC014-CoV; structural characterization of representative antibodies defines a conserved epitope. RBM-focused sera confer protection against SARS-CoV-2 challenge. Thus, RBM focusing is a promising strategy to elicit breadth across emerging sarbecoviruses without compromising SARS-CoV-2 protection. These engineering strategies are adaptable to other viral glycoproteins for targeting conserved epitopes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Viral Envelope Proteins , Animals , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
3.
Med ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1796324

ABSTRACT

Summary Background Since the emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in 2019, viral variants with greater transmissibility or immune-evasion properties have arisen, which could jeopardize recently deployed vaccine- and antibody-based countermeasures. Methods Here, we evaluated in mice and hamsters the efficacy of a pre-clinical version of the Moderna mRNA vaccine (mRNA-1273) and the Johnson & Johnson recombinant adenoviral-vectored vaccine (Ad26.COV2.S) against the B.1.621 (Mu) variant of SARS-CoV-2, which contains spike mutations T95I, Y144S, Y145N, R346K, E484K, N501Y, D614G, P681H, and D950N. Findings Immunization of 129S2 and K18-human ACE2 transgenic mice with the mRNA-1273 vaccine protected against weight loss, lung infection, and lung pathology after challenge with the B.1.621 or WA1/2020 N501Y/D614G SARS-CoV-2 strain. Similarly, immunization of 129S2 mice and Syrian hamsters with a high dose of Ad26.COV2.S reduced lung infection after B.1.621 virus challenge. Conclusions Thus, immunity induced by the mRNA-1273 or Ad26.COV2.S vaccine can protect against the B.1.621 variant of SARS-CoV-2 in multiple animal models. Funding This study was supported by the NIH (R01 AI157155 and U01 AI151810), NIAID Centers of Excellence for Influenza Research and Response [CEIRR] contracts 75N93021C00014 and 75N93021C00016, and the Collaborative Influenza Vaccine Innovation Centers [CIVIC] contract 75N93019C00051. It was also supported, in part, by the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Center for Research on Influenza Pathogenesis (HHSN272201400008C) and the Japan Program for Infectious Diseases Research and Infrastructure (JP21wm0125002) from the Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED).

4.
Sci Transl Med ; : eabn1252, 2022 Apr 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784766

ABSTRACT

New variants of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) continue to arise and prolong the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Here we used a cell-free expression workflow to rapidly screen and optimize constructs containing multiple computationally designed miniprotein inhibitors of SARS-CoV-2. We found the broadest efficacy with a homo-trimeric version of the 75-residue angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) mimic AHB2 (TRI2-2) designed to geometrically match the trimeric spike architecture. In the cryo-electron microscopy structure, TRI2 formed a tripod on top of the spike protein which engaged all three receptor binding domains (RBDs) simultaneously as in the design model. TRI2-2 neutralized Omicron (B.1.1.529), Delta (B.1.617.2), and all other variants tested with greater potency than that of monoclonal antibodies used clinically for the treatment of COVID-19. TRI2-2 also conferred prophylactic and therapeutic protection against SARS-CoV-2 challenge when administered intranasally in mice. Designed miniprotein receptor mimics geometrically arrayed to match pathogen receptor binding sites could be a widely applicable antiviral therapeutic strategy with advantages over antibodies and native receptor traps. By comparison, the designed proteins have resistance to viral escape and antigenic drift by construction, precisely tuned avidity, and greatly reduced chance of autoimmune responses.

5.
Cell ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1763613

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY The large number of spike substitutions in Omicron lineage variants (BA.1, BA.1.1. and BA.2) could jeopardize the efficacy of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines. We evaluated in mice the protective efficacy of the Moderna mRNA-1273 vaccine against BA.1 before or after boosting. Whereas two doses of mRNA-1273 vaccine induced high levels of neutralizing antibodies against historical WA1/2020 strains, lower levels against BA.1 were associated with breakthrough infection and inflammation in the lung. A primary vaccination series with mRNA-1273.529, an Omicron-matched vaccine, potently neutralized BA.1 but inhibited historical or other SARS-CoV-2 variants less effectively. However, boosting with either mRNA-1273 or mRNA-1273.529 vaccines increased neutralizing titers and protection against BA.1 and BA.2 infection. Nonetheless, the neutralizing antibody titers were higher, and lung viral burden and cytokines were slightly lower in mice boosted with mRNA-1273.529 and challenged with BA.1. Thus, boosting with mRNA-1273 or mRNA-1273.529 enhances protection against Omicron infection with limited differences in efficacy measured.

6.
Nat Commun ; 13(1): 1638, 2022 03 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1764180

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pathogen SARS-CoV-2 has infected hundreds of millions and caused over 5 million deaths to date. Although multiple vaccines are available, breakthrough infections occur especially by emerging variants. Effective therapeutic options such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are still critical. Here, we report the development, cryo-EM structures, and functional analyses of mAbs that potently neutralize SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern. By high-throughput single cell sequencing of B cells from spike receptor binding domain (RBD) immunized animals, we identify two highly potent SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing mAb clones that have single-digit nanomolar affinity and low-picomolar avidity, and generate a bispecific antibody. Lead antibodies show strong inhibitory activity against historical SARS-CoV-2 and several emerging variants of concern. We solve several cryo-EM structures at ~3 Å resolution of these neutralizing antibodies in complex with prefusion spike trimer ectodomain, and reveal distinct epitopes, binding patterns, and conformations. The lead clones also show potent efficacy in vivo against authentic SARS-CoV-2 in both prophylactic and therapeutic settings. We also generate and characterize a humanized antibody to facilitate translation and drug development. The humanized clone also has strong potency against both the original virus and the B.1.617.2 Delta variant. These mAbs expand the repertoire of therapeutics against SARS-CoV-2 and emerging variants.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Animals , Antibodies, Bispecific/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Viral Envelope Proteins
7.
Med (N Y) ; 3(3): 188-203.e4, 2022 Mar 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1740045

ABSTRACT

Background: Human monoclonal antibody (mAb) treatments are promising for COVID-19 prevention or therapy. The pre-exposure prophylactic efficacy of neutralizing antibodies that are engineered with mutations to extend their persistence in human serum and the neutralizing antibody titer in serum required for protection against SARS-CoV-2 infection remain poorly characterized. Methods: The Fc region of two neutralizing mAbs (COV2-2130 and COV2-2381) targeting non-overlapping epitopes on the receptor binding domain of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein was engineered to extend their persistence in humans and reduce interactions with Fc gamma receptors. We assessed protection by individual antibodies or a combination of the two antibodies (designated ADM03820) given prophylactically by an intravenous or intramuscular route in a non-human primate (NHP) model of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Findings: Passive transfer of individual mAbs or ADM03820 conferred virological protection in the NHP respiratory tract in a dose-dependent manner, and ADM03820 potently neutralized SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern in vitro. We defined a protective serum-neutralizing antibody titer and concentration in NHPs for passively transferred human antibodies that acted by direct viral neutralization. Conclusions: In summary, we demonstrate that neutralizing antibodies with extended half-life and lacking Fc-mediated effector functions are efficient for pre-exposure prophylaxis of SARS-CoV-2 infection in NHPs. These results support clinical development of ADM03820 for COVID-19 prevention. Funding: This research was supported by a contract from the JPEO-CBRND (W911QY-20-9-003, 20-05); the Joint Sciences and Technology Office and Joint Program Executive Office (MCDC-16-01-002 JSTO, JPEO); a DARPA grant (HR0011-18-2-0001); an NIH grant (R01 AI157155); and the 2019 Future Insight Prize from Merck KGaA.

8.
Cell reports ; 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1728215

ABSTRACT

Hauser et al. use structure-guided design to engineer SARS-2 immunogens that direct immune responses to conserved viral sites in context of preexisting immunity. In mice, these immunogens elicit antibodies that potently neutralize related coronaviruses, including those of potential pandemic concern. Structural characterization of selected antibodies explains this observation.

9.
PLoS Pathog ; 18(1): e1010161, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1703195

ABSTRACT

The global response to Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is now facing new challenges such as vaccine inequity and the emergence of SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern (VOCs). Preclinical models of disease, in particular animal models, are essential to investigate VOC pathogenesis, vaccine correlates of protection and postexposure therapies. Here, we provide an update from the World Health Organization (WHO) COVID-19 modeling expert group (WHO-COM) assembled by WHO, regarding advances in preclinical models. In particular, we discuss how animal model research is playing a key role to evaluate VOC virulence, transmission and immune escape, and how animal models are being refined to recapitulate COVID-19 demographic variables such as comorbidities and age.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/etiology , Disease Models, Animal , SARS-CoV-2 , Age Factors , Animals , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Comorbidity , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
10.
Sci Transl Med ; 14(630): eabm3302, 2022 Feb 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1691437

ABSTRACT

Although mRNA vaccines encoding the spike protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) prevent COVID-19, the emergence of new viral variants jeopardizes their efficacy. Here, we assessed the immunogenicity and protective activity of historical (mRNA-1273, designed for Wuhan-1 spike protein) or modified (mRNA-1273.351, designed for B.1.351 spike protein) Moderna mRNA vaccines in 129S2 and K18-hACE2 mice. Mice were immunized with either high-dose or low-dose formulations of the mRNA vaccines, where low-dose vaccination modeled suboptimal immune responses. Immunization with formulations at either dose induced neutralizing antibodies in serum against ancestral SARS-CoV-2 WA1/2020 and several virus variants, although serum titers were lower against the B.1.617.2 (Delta) virus. Protection against weight loss and lung pathology was observed with all high-dose vaccines against all viruses. However, low-dose formulations of the vaccines, which produced lower magnitude antibody and T cell responses, showed breakthrough lung infections with B.1.617.2 and development of pneumonia in K18-hACE2 mice. Thus, in individuals with reduced immunity after mRNA vaccination, breakthrough infection and disease may occur with some SARS-CoV-2 variants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Mice , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Vaccines, Synthetic
11.
Sci Transl Med ; 14(632): eabi5735, 2022 Feb 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1691438

ABSTRACT

The emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variants stresses the continued need for next-generation vaccines that confer broad protection against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We developed and evaluated an adjuvanted SARS-CoV-2 spike ferritin nanoparticle (SpFN) vaccine in nonhuman primates. High-dose (50 µg) SpFN vaccine, given twice 28 days apart, induced a Th1-biased CD4 T cell helper response and elicited neutralizing antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 wild-type and variants of concern, as well as against SARS-CoV-1. These potent humoral and cell-mediated immune responses translated into rapid elimination of replicating virus in the upper and lower airways and lung parenchyma of nonhuman primates following high-dose SARS-CoV-2 respiratory challenge. The immune response elicited by SpFN vaccination and resulting efficacy in nonhuman primates supports the utility of SpFN as a vaccine candidate for SARS-causing betacoronaviruses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nanoparticles , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19 Vaccines , Ferritins , Humans , Immunity , Macaca mulatta , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
12.
Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology ; 12, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1688195

ABSTRACT

Immunocompromised adults can have prolonged acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) positive RT-PCR results, long after the initial diagnosis of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This study aimed to determine if SARS-CoV-2 virus can be recovered in viral cell culture from immunocompromised adults with persistently positive SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR tests. We obtained 20 remnant SARS-CoV-2 PCR positive nasopharyngeal swabs from 20 immunocompromised adults with a positive RT-PCR test ≥14 days after the initial positive test. The patients’ 2nd test samples underwent SARS-CoV-2 antigen testing, and culture with Vero-hACE2-TMPRSS2 cells. Viral RNA and cultivable virus were recovered from the cultured cells after qRT-PCR and plaque assays. Of 20 patients, 10 (50%) had a solid organ transplant and 5 (25%) had a hematologic malignancy. For most patients, RT-PCR Ct values increased over time. There were 2 patients with positive viral cell cultures;one patient had chronic lymphocytic leukemia treated with venetoclax and obinutuzumab who had a low viral titer of 27 PFU/mL. The second patient had marginal zone lymphoma treated with bendamustine and rituximab who had a high viral titer of 2 x 106 PFU/mL. Most samples collected ≥7 days after an initial positive SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR had negative viral cell cultures. The 2 patients with positive viral cell cultures had hematologic malignancies treated with chemotherapy and B cell depleting therapy. One patient had a high concentration titer of cultivable virus. Further data are needed to determine risk factors for persistent viral shedding and methods to prevent SARS-CoV-2 transmission from immunocompromised hosts.

13.
Nat Immunol ; 23(2): 165-176, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1671597

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-2, continues to cause substantial morbidity and mortality. While most infections are mild, some patients experience severe and potentially fatal systemic inflammation, tissue damage, cytokine storm and acute respiratory distress syndrome. The innate immune system acts as the first line of defense, sensing the virus through pattern recognition receptors and activating inflammatory pathways that promote viral clearance. Here, we discuss innate immune processes involved in SARS-CoV-2 recognition and the resultant inflammation. Improved understanding of how the innate immune system detects and responds to SARS-CoV-2 will help identify targeted therapeutic modalities that mitigate severe disease and improve patient outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Innate , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cytokines/immunology , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , Immune Evasion , Inflammasomes/immunology , Inflammasomes/metabolism , NLR Proteins/immunology , NLR Proteins/metabolism , Receptors, Pattern Recognition/immunology , Receptors, Pattern Recognition/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Signal Transduction , Toll-Like Receptors/immunology , Toll-Like Receptors/metabolism , Virus Internalization
14.
Nat Med ; 28(3): 490-495, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1638696

ABSTRACT

The emergence of the highly transmissible B.1.1.529 Omicron variant of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is concerning for antibody countermeasure efficacy because of the number of mutations in the spike protein. In this study, we tested a panel of anti-receptor-binding domain monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) corresponding to those in clinical use by Vir Biotechnology (S309, the parent mAb of VIR-7831 (sotrovimab)), AstraZeneca (COV2-2196 and COV2-2130, the parent mAbs of AZD8895 and AZD1061), Regeneron (REGN10933 and REGN10987), Eli Lilly (LY-CoV555 and LY-CoV016) and Celltrion (CT-P59) for their ability to neutralize an infectious B.1.1.529 Omicron isolate. Several mAbs (LY-CoV555, LY-CoV016, REGN10933, REGN10987 and CT-P59) completely lost neutralizing activity against B.1.1.529 virus in both Vero-TMPRSS2 and Vero-hACE2-TMPRSS2 cells, whereas others were reduced (COV2-2196 and COV2-2130 combination, ~12-fold decrease) or minimally affected (S309). Our results suggest that several, but not all, of the antibodies in clinical use might lose efficacy against the B.1.1.529 Omicron variant.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Monoclonal/pharmacology , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized , Antibodies, Neutralizing/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Viral/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
15.
mBio ; : e0337721, 2022 Jan 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1637923

ABSTRACT

Pathogenic coronaviruses are a major threat to global public health. Here, using a recombinant reporter virus-based compound screening approach, we identified small-molecule inhibitors that potently block the replication of severe acute respiratory syndrome virus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Among them, JIB-04 inhibited SARS-CoV-2 replication in Vero E6 cells with a 50% effective concentration of 695 nM, with a specificity index of greater than 1,000. JIB-04 showed in vitro antiviral activity in multiple cell types, including primary human bronchial epithelial cells, against several DNA and RNA viruses, including porcine coronavirus transmissible gastroenteritis virus. In an in vivo porcine model of coronavirus infection, administration of JIB-04 reduced virus infection and associated tissue pathology, which resulted in improved weight gain and survival. These results highlight the potential utility of JIB-04 as an antiviral agent against SARS-CoV-2 and other viral pathogens. IMPORTANCE The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the disease caused by SARS-CoV-2 infection, is an ongoing public health disaster worldwide. Although several vaccines are available as a preventive measure and the FDA approval of an orally bioavailable drug is on the horizon, there remains a need for developing antivirals against SARS-CoV-2 that could work on the early course of infection. By using infectious reporter viruses, we screened small-molecule inhibitors for antiviral activity against SARS-CoV-2. Among the top hits was JIB-04, a compound previously studied for its anticancer activity. Here, we showed that JIB-04 inhibits the replication of SARS-CoV-2 as well as different DNA and RNA viruses. Furthermore, JIB-04 conferred protection in a porcine model of coronavirus infection, although to a lesser extent when given as therapeutic rather than prophylactic doses. Our findings indicate a limited but still promising utility of JIB-04 as an antiviral agent in the combat against COVID-19 and potentially other viral diseases.

16.
J Virol ; 96(1): e0151121, 2022 01 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1621995

ABSTRACT

The development of mouse models for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has enabled testing of vaccines and therapeutics and defining aspects of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pathogenesis. SARS-CoV-2 disease is severe in K18 transgenic mice (K18-hACE2 Tg) expressing human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (hACE2), the SARS-CoV-2 receptor, under an ectopic cytokeratin promoter, with high levels of infection measured in the lung and brain. Here, we evaluated SARS-CoV-2 infection in hACE2 knock-in (KI) mice that express hACE2 under an endogenous promoter in place of murine ACE2 (mACE2). Intranasal inoculation of hACE2 KI mice with SARS-CoV-2 WA1/2020 resulted in substantial viral replication within the upper and lower respiratory tracts with limited spread to extrapulmonary organs. However, SARS-CoV-2-infected hACE2 KI mice did not lose weight and developed limited pathology. Moreover, no significant differences in viral burden were observed in hACE2 KI mice infected with B.1.1.7 or B.1.351 variants compared to the WA1/2020 strain. Because the entry mechanisms of SARS-CoV-2 in mice remain uncertain, we evaluated the impact of the naturally occurring, mouse-adapting N501Y mutation by comparing infection of hACE2 KI, K18-hACE2 Tg, ACE2-deficient, and wild-type C57BL/6 mice. The N501Y mutation minimally affected SARS-CoV-2 infection in hACE2 KI mice but was required for viral replication in wild-type C57BL/6 mice in a mACE2-dependent manner and augmented pathogenesis in the K18-hACE2 Tg mice. Thus, the N501Y mutation likely enhances interactions with mACE2 or hACE2 in vivo. Overall, our study highlights the hACE2 KI mice as a model of mild SARS-CoV-2 infection and disease and clarifies the requirement of the N501Y mutation in mice. IMPORTANCE Mouse models of SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis have facilitated the rapid evaluation of countermeasures. While the first generation of models developed pneumonia and severe disease after SARS-CoV-2 infection, they relied on ectopic expression of supraphysiological levels of human ACE2 (hACE2). This has raised issues with their relevance to humans, as the hACE2 receptor shows a more restricted expression pattern in the respiratory tract. Here, we evaluated SARS-CoV-2 infection and disease with viruses containing or lacking a key mouse-adapting mutation in the spike gene in hACE2 KI mice, which express hACE2 under an endogenous promoter in place of murine ACE2. While infection of hACE2 KI mice with multiple strains of SARS-CoV-2 including variants of concern resulted in viral replication within the upper and lower respiratory tracts, the animals did not sustain severe lung injury. Thus, hACE2 KI mice serve as a model of mild infection with both ancestral and emerging SARS-CoV-2 variant strains.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Lung/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/pathology , Disease Models, Animal , Gene Expression , Gene Knock-In Techniques , Humans , Inflammation , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , Mutation , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Viral Load , Virus Replication
17.
Nature ; 602(7898): 664-670, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1616991

ABSTRACT

The recently emerged SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant encodes 37 amino acid substitutions in the spike protein, 15 of which are in the receptor-binding domain (RBD), thereby raising concerns about the effectiveness of available vaccines and antibody-based therapeutics. Here we show that the Omicron RBD binds to human ACE2 with enhanced affinity, relative to the Wuhan-Hu-1 RBD, and binds to mouse ACE2. Marked reductions in neutralizing activity were observed against Omicron compared to the ancestral pseudovirus in plasma from convalescent individuals and from individuals who had been vaccinated against SARS-CoV-2, but this loss was less pronounced after a third dose of vaccine. Most monoclonal antibodies that are directed against the receptor-binding motif lost in vitro neutralizing activity against Omicron, with only 3 out of 29 monoclonal antibodies retaining unaltered potency, including the ACE2-mimicking S2K146 antibody1. Furthermore, a fraction of broadly neutralizing sarbecovirus monoclonal antibodies neutralized Omicron through recognition of antigenic sites outside the receptor-binding motif, including sotrovimab2, S2X2593 and S2H974. The magnitude of Omicron-mediated immune evasion marks a major antigenic shift in SARS-CoV-2. Broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies that recognize RBD epitopes that are conserved among SARS-CoV-2 variants and other sarbecoviruses may prove key to controlling the ongoing pandemic and future zoonotic spillovers.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies/immunology , Neutralization Tests , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Cell Line , Convalescence , Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte/immunology , Humans , Immune Evasion , Mice , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Vesiculovirus/genetics
19.
Med (N Y) ; 2(12): 1327-1341.e4, 2021 Dec 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1568933

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although vaccines effectively prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in healthy individuals, they appear to be less immunogenic in individuals with chronic inflammatory disease (CID) or receiving chronic immunosuppression therapy. METHODS: Here we assessed a cohort of 77 individuals with CID treated as monotherapy with chronic immunosuppressive drugs for antibody responses in serum against historical and variant severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) viruses after immunization with the BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine. FINDINGS: Longitudinal analysis showed the greatest reductions in neutralizing antibodies and Fc effector function capacity in individuals treated with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) inhibitors (TNFi), and this pattern appeared to be worse against the B.1.617.2 delta virus. Within 5 months of vaccination, serum neutralizing titers of all TNFi-treated individuals tested fell below the presumed threshold correlate for antibody-mediated protection. However, TNFi-treated individuals receiving a third mRNA vaccine dose boosted their serum neutralizing antibody titers by more than 16-fold. CONCLUSIONS: Vaccine boosting or administration of long-acting prophylaxis (e.g., monoclonal antibodies) will likely be required to prevent SARS-CoV-2 infection in this susceptible population. FUNDING: This study was supported by grants and contracts from the NIH (R01 AI157155, R01AI151178, and HHSN75N93019C00074; NIAID Centers of Excellence for Influenza Research and Response (CEIRR) contracts HHSN272201400008C and 75N93021C00014; and Collaborative Influenza Vaccine Innovation Centers [CIVIC] contract 75N93019C00051).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Hepatitis Delta Virus , Humans , RNA, Messenger/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha , Vaccines, Synthetic
20.
Open forum infectious diseases ; 8(Suppl 1):281-281, 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1564882

ABSTRACT

Background Immunocompromised (IC) patients (pts) can have prolonged SARS-CoV-2 PCR positivity, even after resolution of COVID-19 symptoms. This study aimed to determine if viable virus could be detected in samples collected > 21 days after an initial positive (pos) SARS-CoV-2 PCR in IC pts. Methods We obtained 20 remnant SARS-CoV-2 PCR pos nasopharyngeal swabs from IC pts (bone marrow or solid organ transplant, high dose steroids, immunosuppressive medications) with a pos repeat PCR within the previous 30 days. The repeat specimens were cultured on Vero-hACE2-TMPRSS2 cells and incubated for 96 hours to assess viral viability. Viable RNA and infectious virus in the cultured cells were measured by qPCR and infectious plaque assays. RNA sequencing was performed on a HiSeq platform (Illumina). Samples also underwent SARS-CoV-2 antigen (Ag) testing (BD Veritor). Clinical data were extracted from the electronic health record by chart review. Results Pt characteristics are in Table 1. Viral cultures from the repeat specimen were negative (neg) for 18 pts and pos for 2 (Table 2). Pt 1 is a 60M treated with obinatuzumab 19 days prior to his first pos PCR test, with repeat specimen collected 21 days later (cycle threshold (Ct) not available). Pt 1 had a low viral titer (27 PFU/mL) & a D614G mutation on sequencing. Pt 2 is a 75M treated with rituximab 10 days prior to his first pos PCR test, with repeat specimen collected 23 days later (Ct 27.56/27.74). Pt 2 had a high viral titer (2e6 PFU/mL) and D614G, S98F, and S813I mutations. Demographics of Study Population (N=20) Characteristics of patients with a positive SARS-CoV-2 viral culture Conclusion 90% of specimens collected > 21 days after an initial pos SARS-CoV-2 PCR did not have viable virus detected on their repeat specimen. The 2 pts with pos viral cultures had active hematologic malignancies treated with an anti-CD20 mAb at the time of COVID-19 diagnosis. One pt had a high concentration of active, viable virus. No known variants of concern were noted in this cohort, collected in Q2 2020, though prolonged replication is a risk for variant development. Further data are needed about risk factors for persistent viable viral shedding & methods to prevent transmission of viable virus from IC hosts. Disclosures Victoria J. Fraser, MD, CDC Epicenters (Grant/Research Support)Cigna/Express Scripts (Other Financial or Material Support, Spouse is Chief Clinical Officer)Doris Duke Fund to Retain Clinical Scientists (Grant/Research Support, Research Grant or Support)Foundation for Barnes-Jewish Hospital (Grant/Research Support, Research Grant or Support)NIH (Grant/Research Support, Research Grant or Support) Victoria J. Fraser, MD, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Individual(s) Involved: Self): Grant/Research Support, Research Grant or Support;Cigna/Express Scripts (Individual(s) Involved: Spouse/Partner): Employee;Doris Duke Charitable Foundation (Individual(s) Involved: Self): Grant/Research Support, Research Grant or Support;National Institutes of Health (Individual(s) Involved: Self): Grant/Research Support, Research Grant or Support;The Foundation for Barnes-Jewish Hospital (Individual(s) Involved: Self): Grant/Research Support, Research Grant or Support Michael S. Diamond, MD, PhD, Carnival Corporation (Consultant)Emergent BioSolutions (Grant/Research Support)Fortress Biotech (Consultant)Immunome (Advisor or Review Panel member)Inbios (Consultant)Moderna (Grant/Research Support, Advisor or Review Panel member)Vir Biotechnology (Consultant, Grant/Research Support) Carey-Ann Burnham, PhD, BioFire (Grant/Research Support, Other Financial or Material Support)bioMerieux (Grant/Research Support)Cepheid (Consultant, Grant/Research Support)Luminex (Grant/Research Support)Roche (Other Financial or Material Support) Carey-Ann Burnham, PhD, BioFire (Individual(s) Involved: Self): Grant/Research Support;bioMerieux (Individual(s) Involved: Self): Grant/Research Support, Scientific Research Study Investigator, Speakers’ bureau;Cepheid (Individual(s) Involved: Self): Consultant, Grant/Research Support, Scientific Research Study Investigator;Luminex (Individual(s) Involved: Self): Scientific Research Study Investigator Hilary Babcock, MD, MPH, FIDSA, FSHEA, Nothing to disclose

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