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1.
Biomedicines ; 10(2):204, 2022.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-1625623

ABSTRACT

Vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 with BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine plays a critical role in COVID-19 prevention. Although BNT162b2 is highly effective against COVID-19, a time-dependent decrease in neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) is observed. The aim of this study was to identify the individual features that may predict NAbs levels after vaccination. Machine learning techniques were applied to data from 302 subjects. Principal component analysis (PCA), factor analysis of mixed data (FAMD), k-means clustering, and random forest were used. PCA and FAMD showed that younger subjects had higher levels of neutralizing antibodies than older subjects. The effect of age is strongest near the vaccination date and appears to decrease with time. Obesity was associated with lower antibody response. Gender had no effect on NAbs at nine months, but there was a modest association at earlier time points. Participants with autoimmune disease had lower inhibitory levels than participants without autoimmune disease. K-Means clustering showed the natural grouping of subjects into five categories in which the characteristics of some individuals predominated. Random forest allowed the characteristics to be ordered by importance. Older age, higher body mass index, and the presence of autoimmune diseases had negative effects on the development of NAbs against SARS-CoV-2, nine months after full vaccination.

3.
Blood ; 138(19):3207-3207, 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1602596

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 has been associated with hypercoagulability, endothelial cell injury and frequent thrombotic complications resulting both from direct effects of the virus on the endothelium and from the ‘cytokine storm’ resulting from the host's immune response. Since the COVID-19 vaccines have been shown to effectively prevent symptomatic infection including hospital admissions and severe disease, the risk of COVID-19-related thrombosis should be expected to (almost) disappear in vaccinated individuals. However, some rare cases of venous thrombosis have been reported in individuals vaccinated with mRNA vaccines. Thus, there is a sharp contrast between the clinical or experimental data reported in the literature on COVID-19 and on the rare thrombotic events observed after the vaccination with these vaccines. This phenomenon raised some scepticism of even some fear about the safety of these vaccines which could compromise the adhesion of the citizens in the vaccination program. Aims: We conducted a prospective observational study, to explore the impact of vaccination with the BNT162b2 (Pfizer/BioNTech) on blood hypercoagulability and endothelial cell activation and to investigate if this is modified by the presence of active cancer. Methods: In total 229 subjects were prospectively included in the study from April to June 2021. Subjects were stratified in three predefined groups: 127 vaccinated patients with active cancer (VOnco group), 72 vaccinated health care workers (VHcw group) and 30 non vaccinated health individuals (Control group). Blood samples were obtained 2 days after the administration of the first dose of BNT162b2 vaccine and collected in Vacutainer® tubes (0.109 mol/L trisodium citrate). Platelet poor plasma (PPP) was prepared by double centrifugation at 2000 g for 20 minutes at room temperature and plasma aliquots were stored at -80°C until assayed. Samples of PPP were assessed for thrombin generation (TG) with PPP-Reagent® (Thrombogram-Thrombinoscope assay with PPP-Reagent®TF 5pM), E-selectin, D-dimers, (D-Di), Tissue Factor (TFa), procoagulant phospholipid-dependent clotting time (Procag-PPL) and von Willebrand factor (vWF), thrombomodulin (TM), tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), and platelet factor 4 (PF4). All assays were from Diagnostica Stago (France). The upper and lower normal limits (UNL and LNL) for each biomarker were calculated by the mean±2SD for the control group. Results: All vaccinated subjects showed significantly increased levels of PF4 (71% >UNL, p<0.001), D-Dimers (74% >UNL, p<0.01), vWF (60% >UNL, p<0.01), FVIII (62% >UNL, p<0.01) and shorter Procoag-PPL clotting time (96% <LNL, p<0.001), as compared to controls. Thrombin generation showed significantly higher Peak (60% >UNL, p<0.01), ETP (38% >UNL, p<0.01) and MRI (66% >UNL, p<0.01) but no differences in lag-time in vaccinated subjects as compared to the control group. Vaccinated subjects did not show any increase at the levels of TFa, TFPI, TM and E-selectin in comparison with the control group. The studied biomarkers were not significantly different between the VOnco and VHcw groups. Conclusion: The ROADMAP-COVID-19-Vaccine study shows that administration of the first dose of the BNT162b2 vaccine induced significant platelet activation documented by shorter Procoag-PPL associated with increased levels of PF4. Plasma hypercoagulability was less frequent in vaccinated individuals whereas there was no evidence of significant endothelial cells activation after vaccination. Interestingly, the presence of active cancer was not associated with an enhancement of platelet activation, hypercoagulability, or endothelial cell activation after the vaccination. Probably, the generated antibodies against the spike protein or lead to platelet activation in a FcyRIIa dependent manner that results in PF4 release. The implication of the mild inflammatory reaction triggered by the vaccination could be another possible pathway leading to platelet activation. Nevertheless, vaccination does not provoke endothelial activation even n patients with cancer. The findings of the ROADMAP-COVID-19-Vaccine study support the concept administration of mRNA based vaccines does not directly cause a systematic hypercoagulability. Disclosures Gligorov:  Roche-Genentech: Research Funding;Novartis: Research Funding;Onxeo: Research Funding;Daichi: Research Funding;MSD: Research Funding;Eisai: Research Funding;Genomic Heatlh: Research Funding;Ipsen: Research Funding;Macrogenics: Research Funding;Pfizer: Research Funding. Terpos:  Novartis: Honoraria;Janssen: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding;Genesis: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding;Celgene: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding;BMS: Honoraria;Amgen: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding;Takeda: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding;Sanofi: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding;GSK: Honoraria, Research Funding. Dimopoulos:  Amgen: Honoraria;BMS: Honoraria;Janssen: Honoraria;Beigene: Honoraria;Takeda: Honoraria.

5.
Hemasphere ; 6(1): e677, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598646

ABSTRACT

The sustainability of coronavirus 19 (COVID-19) vaccine-induced immunity against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is critical to be determined to inform public health decisions on vaccination programs and prevention measures against COVID-19. The aim of the present study was to prospectively evaluate the kinetics of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) and anti-S-receptor binding domain (RBD IgGs) against SARS-CoV-2 after full vaccination with the BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine for up to 9 months in healthy individuals (NCT04743388). The assessments were performed at the following time points after the second vaccination: 2 weeks, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, and 9 months. The measurements were performed with the GenScript's cPassTM SARS-CoV-2 NAbs Detection Kit (GenScript, Inc.; Piscataway, NJ) and the Elecsys Anti-SARS-CoV-2 S assay (Roche Diagnostics GmbH; Mannheim, Germany). Three hundred nine participants with a median age of 48 years were included. A gradual decline in both NAbs and anti-S-RBD IgGs became evident from 2 weeks to 9 months postvaccination. Both NAbs and anti-S-RBD IgGs levels were significantly lower at 9 months compared with the previous timepoints. Interestingly, age was found to exert a statistically significant effect on NAbs elimination only during the first-trimester postvaccination, as older age was associated with a more rapid clearance of NAbs. Furthermore, simulation studies predicted that the median NAb value would fall from 66% at 9 months to 59% and 45% at 12 and 18 months postvaccination, respectively. This finding may reflect a declining degree of immune protection against COVID-19 and advocates for the administration of booster vaccine shots especially in areas with emerging outbreaks.

6.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 9(10)2021 Oct 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526864

ABSTRACT

Among healthcare workers (HCWs), SARS-CoV-2 vaccine hesitancy may be linked to a higher susceptibility to nocebo effects, i.e., adverse events (AEs) experienced after medical treatments due to negative expectations. To investigate this hypothesis a cross-sectional survey was performed with a self-completed questionnaire that included a tool (Q-No) for the identification of nocebo-prone individuals. A total of 1309 HCWs (67.2% women; 43.4% physicians; 28.4% nurses; 11.5% administrative staff; 16.6% other personnel) completed the questionnaires, among whom 237 (18.1%) had declined vaccination. Q-No scores were ≥15 in 325 participants (24.8%) suggesting nocebo-prone behavior. In a multivariate logistic regression model with Q-No score, age, gender, and occupation as independent variables, estimated odds ratios (ORs) of vaccination were 0.43 (i.e., less likely, p < 0.001) in participants with Q-No score ≥ 15 vs. Q-No score < 15, 0.58 in females vs. males (p = 0.013), and 4.7 (i.e., more likely) in physicians vs. other HCWs (p < 0.001), independent of age, which was not significantly associated with OR of vaccination. At least one adverse effect (AE) was reported by 67.5% of vaccinees, mostly local pain and flu-like symptoms. In a multivariate logistic regression model, with Q-No score, age, gender, and occupation as independent variables, estimated ORs of AE reporting were 2.0 in females vs. males (p < 0.001) and 1.47 in physicians vs. other HCWs (p = 0.017) independently of age and Q-No score, which were not significantly associated with OR of AE. These findings suggest that nocebo-prone behavior in HCWs is associated with SARS-CoV-2 vaccination hesitancy indicating a potential benefit of a campaign focused on nocebo-prone people.

8.
Cell Rep ; 36(6): 109504, 2021 08 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1491797

ABSTRACT

Early responses to vaccination are important for shaping both humoral and cellular protective immunity. Dissecting innate vaccine signatures may predict immunogenicity to help optimize the efficacy of mRNA and other vaccine strategies. Here, we characterize the cytokine and chemokine responses to the 1st and 2nd dose of the BNT162b2 mRNA (Pfizer/BioNtech) vaccine in antigen-naive and in previously coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-infected individuals (NCT04743388). Transient increases in interleukin-15 (IL-15) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) levels early after boost correlate with Spike antibody levels, supporting their use as biomarkers of effective humoral immunity development in response to vaccination. We identify a systemic signature including increases in IL-15, IFN-γ, and IP-10/CXCL10 after the 1st vaccination, which were enriched by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and IL-6 after the 2nd vaccination. In previously COVID-19-infected individuals, a single vaccination results in both strong cytokine induction and antibody titers similar to the ones observed upon booster vaccination in antigen-naive individuals, a result with potential implication for future public health recommendations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Chemokine CXCL10/immunology , Interferon-gamma/immunology , Interleukin-15/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Female , Humans , Immunity/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , RNA, Messenger/immunology
9.
Am J Hematol ; 2021 Oct 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1479374

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) is considered a multisystemic disease. Several studies have reported persistent symptoms or late-onset complications after acute COVID-19, including post-COVID-19 hematological disorders. COVID-19-induced coagulopathy, an immunothrombotic state, has been linked to thromboembolic and hemorrhagic events. Late-onset thrombocytopenia related to immune system dysregulation has also been reported as a rare manifestation post COVID-19. Close monitoring of laboratory dynamics is considered essential to identify timely abnormal values that need further investigation, providing supportive care whenever indicated. The role of hematologists is essential in terms of the multidisciplinary approach of long COVID-19. This review summarizes all the available evidence on post-acute COVID-19 hematological complications.

10.
Front Immunol ; 12: 746203, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477828

ABSTRACT

The reasons behind the clinical variability of SARS-CoV-2 infection, ranging from asymptomatic infection to lethal disease, are still unclear. We performed genome-wide transcriptional whole-blood RNA sequencing, bioinformatics analysis and PCR validation to test the hypothesis that immune response-related gene signatures reflecting baseline may differ between healthy individuals, with an equally robust antibody response, who experienced an entirely asymptomatic (n=17) versus clinical SARS-CoV-2 infection (n=15) in the past months (mean of 14 weeks). Among 12.789 protein-coding genes analysed, we identified six and nine genes with significantly decreased or increased expression, respectively, in those with prior asymptomatic infection relatively to those with clinical infection. All six genes with decreased expression (IFIT3, IFI44L, RSAD2, FOLR3, PI3, ALOX15), are involved in innate immune response while the first two are interferon-induced proteins. Among genes with increased expression six are involved in immune response (GZMH, CLEC1B, CLEC12A), viral mRNA translation (GCAT), energy metabolism (CACNA2D2) and oxidative stress response (ENC1). Notably, 8/15 differentially expressed genes are regulated by interferons. Our results suggest that subtle differences at baseline expression of innate immunity-related genes may be associated with an asymptomatic disease course in SARS-CoV-2 infection. Whether a certain gene signature predicts, or not, those who will develop a more efficient immune response upon exposure to SARS-CoV-2, with implications for prioritization for vaccination, warrant further study.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Asymptomatic Infections , Immunity, Innate/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Transcriptome/genetics , Adult , COVID-19/pathology , Female , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Male , RNA, Messenger/genetics , Sequence Analysis, RNA , Severity of Illness Index
12.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 20239, 2021 10 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1467128

ABSTRACT

Accurate risk stratification in COVID-19 patients consists a major clinical need to guide therapeutic strategies. We sought to evaluate the prognostic role of estimated pulse wave velocity (ePWV), a marker of arterial stiffness which reflects overall arterial integrity and aging, in risk stratification of hospitalized patients with COVID-19. This retrospective, longitudinal cohort study, analyzed a total population of 1671 subjects consisting of 737 hospitalized COVID-19 patients consecutively recruited from two tertiary centers (Newcastle cohort: n = 471 and Pisa cohort: n = 266) and a non-COVID control cohort (n = 934). Arterial stiffness was calculated using validated formulae for ePWV. ePWV progressively increased across the control group, COVID-19 survivors and deceased patients (adjusted mean increase per group 1.89 m/s, P < 0.001). Using a machine learning approach, ePWV provided incremental prognostic value and improved reclassification for mortality over the core model including age, sex and comorbidities [AUC (core model + ePWV vs. core model) = 0.864 vs. 0.755]. ePWV provided similar prognostic value when pulse pressure or hs-Troponin were added to the core model or over its components including age and mean blood pressure (p < 0.05 for all). The optimal prognostic ePWV value was 13.0 m/s. ePWV conferred additive discrimination (AUC: 0.817 versus 0.779, P < 0.001) and reclassification value (NRI = 0.381, P < 0.001) over the 4C Mortality score, a validated score for predicting mortality in COVID-19 and the Charlson comorbidity index. We suggest that calculation of ePWV, a readily applicable estimation of arterial stiffness, may serve as an additional clinical tool to refine risk stratification of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 beyond established risk factors and scores.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Vascular Stiffness , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , United Kingdom/epidemiology
13.
Life (Basel) ; 11(10)2021 Oct 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463742

ABSTRACT

Elucidating long-term immunity following COVID-19 vaccination is essential for decision-making regarding booster shots. The aim of this study was to investigate the kinetics of neutralizing antibodies (Nabs) against SARS-CoV-2 up to six months after the second vaccination dose with the BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine. Nabs levels were measured on days 1 (before the first vaccine shot), 8, 22 (before the second shot), 36, 50, and 3 and 6 months after the second vaccination (NCT04743388). Three hundred and eight healthy individuals without malignant disease were included in this study. At six months, 2.59% of the participants had a Nabs value less than 30%, while 11.9% had Nabs values of less than 50%. Importantly, 58% of the subjects had Nabs values of more than 75%. Nabs were initially eliminated at a relatively slow rate, but after three months their elimination was 5.7 times higher. Older age was inversely associated with Nabs levels at all examined timepoints. Interestingly, a population modeling analysis estimated that half of the subjects will have Nabs values less than 73.8% and 64.6% at 9 and 12 months, respectively, post vaccination completion. In conclusion, we found a persistent but declining anti-SARS-CoV-2 humoral immunity at six months following full vaccination with BNT162b2 in healthy individuals, which was more pronounced among older persons. These data may inform the public health policies regarding the prioritization of booster vaccine shots.

14.
BMC Med ; 19(1): 208, 2021 08 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455966

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, the causative agent of COVID-19, has caused a still evolving global pandemic. Given the worldwide vaccination campaign, the understanding of the vaccine-induced versus COVID-19-induced immunity will contribute to adjusting vaccine dosing strategies and speeding-up vaccination efforts. METHODS: Anti-spike-RBD IgGs and neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) titers were measured in BNT162b2 mRNA vaccinated participants (n = 250); we also investigated humoral and cellular immune responses in vaccinated individuals (n = 21) of this cohort 5 months post-vaccination and assayed NAbs levels in COVID-19 hospitalized patients (n = 60) with moderate or severe disease, as well as in COVID-19 recovered patients (n = 34). RESULTS: We found that one (boosting) dose of the BNT162b2 vaccine triggers robust immune (i.e., anti-spike-RBD IgGs and NAbs) responses in COVID-19 convalescent healthy recipients, while naïve recipients require both priming and boosting shots to acquire high antibody titers. Severe COVID-19 triggers an earlier and more intense (versus moderate disease) immune response in hospitalized patients; in all cases, however, antibody titers remain at high levels in COVID-19 recovered patients. Although virus infection promotes an earlier and more intense, versus priming vaccination, immune response, boosting vaccination induces antibody titers significantly higher and likely more durable versus COVID-19. In support, high anti-spike-RBD IgGs/NAbs titers along with spike (vaccine encoded antigen) specific T cell clones were found in the serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, respectively, of vaccinated individuals 5 months post-vaccination. CONCLUSIONS: These findings support vaccination efficacy, also suggesting that vaccination likely offers more protection than natural infection.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Kinetics , Leukocytes, Mononuclear , RNA, Messenger , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Blood Adv ; 5(21): 4398-4405, 2021 11 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1416799

ABSTRACT

Immunocompromised patients with hematologic malignancies are more susceptible to COVID-19 and at higher risk of severe complications and worse outcomes compared with the general population. In this context, we evaluated the humoral response by determining the titers of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) against SARS-CoV-2 in patients with Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) after vaccination with the BNT162b2 or AZD1222 vaccine. A US Food and Drug Administration-approved enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based methodology was implemented to evaluate NAbs on the day of the first vaccine shot, as well as on days 22 and 50 afterward. A total of 106 patients with WM (43% men; median age, 73 years) and 212 healthy controls (46% men; median age, 66 years) who were vaccinated during the same period at the same center were enrolled in the study (which is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT04743388). Our data indicate that vaccination with either 2 doses of the BNT162b2 or 1 dose of the AZD1222 vaccine leads to lower production of NAbs against SARS-CoV-2 in patients with WM compared with controls on days 22 and 50 (P < .001 for all comparisons). Disease-related immune dysregulation and therapy-related immunosuppression are involved in the low humoral response. Importantly, active treatment with either rituximab or Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitors was proven as an independent prognostic factor for suboptimal antibody response after vaccination. In conclusion, patients with WM have low humoral response after COVID-19 vaccination, which underlines the need for timely vaccination ideally during a treatment-free period and for continuous vigilance on infection control measures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia , Aged , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19 Vaccines , Female , Humans , Male , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , United States , Vaccination
16.
Cancers (Basel) ; 13(17)2021 Sep 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1390540

ABSTRACT

Emerging data suggest suboptimal antibody responses to COVID-19 vaccination in patients with hematological malignancies. We evaluated the humoral response following the BNT162b2 vaccine in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), and Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). An FDA-approved, ELISA-based methodology was implemented to evaluate the titers of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) against SARS-CoV-2 on day 1 of the first vaccine, and afterwards on day 22 and 50. One hundred and thirty-two patients with CLL/lymphomas and 214 healthy matched controls vaccinated during the same period, at the same center were enrolled in the study (NCT04743388). Vaccination with two doses of the BNT162b2 vaccine led to lower production of NAbs against SARS-CoV-2 in patients with CLL/lymphomas compared with controls both on day 22 and on day 50 (p < 0.001 for all comparisons). Disease-related immune dysregulation and therapy-related immunosuppression are involved in the low humoral response. Importantly, active treatment with Rituximab, Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitors, or chemotherapy was an independent prognostic factor for suboptimal antibody response. Patients with HL showed superior humoral responses to the NHL/CLL subgroups. In conclusion, patients with CLL/lymphomas have low humoral response following COVID-19 vaccination, underlining the need for timely vaccination ideally during a treatment-free period and for continuous vigilance on infection control measures.

17.
Blood Cancer J ; 11(8): 138, 2021 08 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1338528

ABSTRACT

Recent data suggest a suboptimal antibody response to COVID-19 vaccination in patients with hematological malignancies. Neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) against SARS-CoV-2 were evaluated in 276 patients with plasma cell neoplasms after vaccination with either the BNT162b2 or the AZD1222 vaccine, on days 1 (before the first vaccine shot), 22, and 50. Patients with MM (n = 213), SMM (n = 38), and MGUS (n = 25) and 226 healthy controls were enrolled in the study (NCT04743388). Vaccination with either two doses of the BNT162b2 or one dose of the AZD1222 vaccine leads to lower production of NAbs in patients with MM compared with controls both on day 22 and on day 50 (p < 0.001 for all comparisons). Furthermore, MM patients showed an inferior NAb response compared with MGUS on day 22 (p = 0.009) and on day 50 (p = 0.003). Importantly, active treatment with either anti-CD38 monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) or belantamab mafodotin and lymphopenia at the time of vaccination were independent prognostic factors for suboptimal antibody response following vaccination. In conclusion, MM patients have low humoral response following SARS-CoV-2 vaccination, especially under treatment with anti-CD38 or belamaf. This underlines the need for timely vaccination, possibly during a treatment-free period, and for continuous vigilance on infection control measures in non-responders.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Multiple Myeloma , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Myeloma/blood , Multiple Myeloma/immunology , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
18.
Blood ; 136(Supplement 1):1-2, 2020.
Article in English | PMC | ID: covidwho-1338965

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Convalescent plasma is a promising therapeutic option for corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19). A recent study in 34 COVID-19 patients showed a reduction of recovered patients antibodies within 3 months of infection. The aim on this analysis was to evaluate the antibody titers and explore possible correlations with disease characteristics in volunteer donors, who participated in a phase 2 study for the use of convalescent plasma for the treatment of severe COVID-19 infection.Patients and Methods: This in an ongoing phase 2 study (NCT04408209) for the use of convalescent plasma for severe COVID-19. This analysis reports the results of the first part of the study, regarding the presence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in volunteer plasma donors and their correlation with disease characteristics. The main Inclusion criteria for plasma donors included: (i) confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection by PCR of the nasal/pharyngeal swab;(ii) interval of at least 14 days after complete recovery from COVID-19;(iii) presence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies;(iv) two negative SARS-CoV-2 PCR results (the second at least 7 days prior to plasmapheresis). For the detection of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies we used two commercially developed assays: one ELISA assay (Euroimmun Medizinische Labordiagnostika AG, Lubeck, Germany), which detects antibodies against the recombinant Spike protein of the virus (S1 domain) and a multiplex assay (ProtATonce Ltd, Athens, Greece) based on the Luminex® xMAP™ technology that detects total antibodies (IgG/IgM/IgA) and individual antibody isotypes IgG, IgM and IgA against 3 SARS-CoV-2 antigens (S1, basic nucleocapsid (N) protein and receptor-binding domain (RBD).Results: To-date, 260 (137M/123F) possible plasma donors were tested for the presence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies. At the time of their COVID-19 diagnosis, 20 (7.7%) were asymptomatic, 157 (60.3%) were symptomatic but did not need hospitalization and 83 (32%) were hospitalized. Median time from the day of their first symptom or PCR+ (for asymptomatic patients) till the day of screening was 62 (range: 14-104) days. Anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies were detected in 229 (88%) donors with the Euroimmun assay and in 238 (91.5%) with the multiplex assay (including the 229 who had antibodies with the Euroimmun method). Univariate analysis showed that donors who had asymptomatic COVID-19 had lower antibody titer compared to those who had symptomatic disease but did not need hospitalization or those who hospitalized (Fig. A-D). Donors <50 years had lower antibody titer compared with older patients [for Euroimmun method, median (IQR): 3.94 (5.10) vs. 7.34 (6.16);p<0.0001], while patients who were tested within 60 days from the first day of symptom or PCR+ (for asymptomatic patients) had higher antibody titer [6.09 (6.52) vs. 4.68 (6.12);p=0.024]. The multivariate analysis showed that age ≥50 years (OR 2.88, 95% CI:1.60-5.18;p<0.001) and need for hospitalization (OR 4.11, 95% CI:2.13-7.90;p<0.001) correlated with higher antibody titers, while asymptomatic phase (OR 0.10, 95% CI:0,01-0.82;p<0.001) and testing within ≥60 days post symptoms onset (OR 0.36, 95% CI:0.20-0.66;p=0.001) correlated with lower antibody titers. In the multivariate logistic regression analysis examining associations between individual symptoms and antibody levels, there was strong correlation between anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies and anosmia (OR 11.14, 95% CI:3.92-31.67;p<0.001), loss of taste (OR 5.50, 95% CI:2.23-13.56;p<0.001), fever (OR 4.25, 95% CI:1.90-9.51;p<0.001), and headache (OR 2.34, 95% CI:1.09-5.03;p=0.029). To-date, plasmapheresis was performed in 74 patients with anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, within a median time of 12 (8-19) days after screening;the respective median time (range) from the first day of symptoms or PCR+ was 52 (14-84) days. Interestingly, there was a significant reduction in the antibody titers between the day of screening and the day of plasmapheresis [Fig. E].Conclusion: Lower anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody titers, against all studied epitopes, are found in asymptomatic patients, in patients <50 years and in those who were tested ≥60 days post onset of first symptoms. The rapid reduction of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in our cohort reveals a time pattern of reduction, although we do not know if neutralizing antibodies share the same trend or if this reduction affects the host immunity against SARS-CoV-2.

19.
Cells ; 10(8)2021 07 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1335013

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to investigate the kinetics of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) and anti-SARS-CoV-2 anti-S-RBD IgGs up to three months after the second vaccination dose with the BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine. NAbs and anti-S-RBD levels were measured on days 1 (before the first vaccine shot), 8, 22 (before the second shot), 36, 50, and three months after the second vaccination (D111) (NCT04743388). 283 health workers were included in this study. NAbs showed a rapid increase from D8 to D36 at a constant rate of about 3% per day and reached a median (SD) of 97.2% (4.7) at D36. From D36 to D50, a slight decrease in NAbs values was detected and it became more prominent between D50 and D111 when the rate of decline was determined at -0.11 per day. The median (SD) NAbs value at D111 was 92.7% (11.8). A similar pattern was also observed for anti-S-RBD antibodies. Anti-S-RBDs showed a steeper increase during D22-D36 and a lower decline rate during D36-D111. Prior COVID-19 infection and younger age were associated with superior antibody responses over time. In conclusion, we found a persistent but declining anti-SARS-CoV-2 humoral immunity at 3 months following full vaccination with BNT162b2 in healthy individuals.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Viral/metabolism , Antibody Formation , Female , Humans , Kinetics , Male , Middle Aged , Young Adult
20.
Clin Exp Med ; 2021 Jul 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317568

ABSTRACT

Vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 is considered as the most important preventive strategy against COVID-19, but its efficacy in patients with hematological malignancies is largely unknown. We investigated the development of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) against SARS-CoV-2 in patients with Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia (WM), Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL). After the first dose of the vaccine, on D22, WM/CLL/NHL patients had lower NAb titers compared to controls: the median NAb inhibition titer was 17% (range 0-91%, IQR 8-27%) for WM/CLL/NHL patients versus 32% (range 2-98%, IQR 19-48%) for controls (P < 0.001). Only 8 (14%) patients versus 114 (54%) controls developed NAb titers ≥ 30% on D22 (p < 0.001). Our data indicate that the first dose of both BNT162b2 and AZD1222 leads to lower production of NAbs against SARS-CoV-2 in patients with WM/CLL/NHL compared to controls of similar age and gender and without malignant disease. Even though the response rates were not optimal, vaccination is still considered essential and if possible should be performed before treatment initiation. These patients with suboptimal responses should be considered to be prioritized for booster doses.

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