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2.
iScience ; 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1755857

ABSTRACT

The global pandemic of COVID-19 caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection confers great threat to the public health. Human breastmilk is a complex with nutritional composition to nourish infants and protect them from different kinds of infectious diseases including COVID-19. Here, we identified lactoferrin (LF), mucin1 (MUC1) and α-lactalbumin (α-LA) from human breastmilk inhibit SARS-CoV-2 infection using a SARS-CoV-2 pseudovirus system and transcription and replication-competent SARS-CoV-2 virus-like-particles (trVLP). Additionally, LF and MUC1 inhibited multiple steps including viral attachment, entry and post-entry replication, while α-LA inhibited viral attachment and entry. Importantly, LF, MUC1 and α-LA possessed potent antiviral activities towards variants such as B.1.1.7 (alpha), B.1.351 (beta), P.1 (gamma) and B.1.617.1 (kappa). Taken together, our study provides evidence that human breastmilk components (LF, MUC1 and α-LA) are promising antiviral and potential therapeutic candidates warranting further development or treating COVID-19. Graphical

3.
mBio ; : e0009922, 2022 Mar 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736029

ABSTRACT

Recently, highly transmissible severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variants B.1.617.1 (Kappa), B.1.617.2 (Delta), and B.1.618 with mutations within the spike proteins were identified in India. The spike protein of Kappa contains the four mutations E154K, L452R, E484Q, and P681R, and Delta contains L452R, T478K, and P681R, while B.1.618 spike harbors mutations Δ145-146 and E484K. However, it remains unknown whether these variants have alterations in their entry efficiency, host tropism, and sensitivity to neutralizing antibodies as well as entry inhibitors. In this study, we found that Kappa, Delta, or B.1.618 spike uses human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) with no or slightly increased efficiency, while it gains a significantly increased binding affinity with mouse, marmoset, and koala ACE2 orthologs, which exhibit limited binding with wild-type (WT) spike. Furthermore, the P681R mutation leads to enhanced spike cleavage, which could facilitate viral entry. In addition, Kappa, Delta, and B.1.618 exhibit a reduced sensitivity to neutralization by convalescent-phase sera due to the mutation E484Q, T478K, Δ145-146, or E484K, but remain sensitive to entry inhibitors such as ACE2-Ig decoy receptor. Collectively, our study revealed that enhanced human and mouse ACE2 receptor engagement, increased spike cleavage, and reduced sensitivity to neutralization antibodies of Kappa, Delta and B.1.618 may contribute to the rapid spread of these variants. Furthermore, our results also highlight that ACE2-Ig could be developed as a broad-spectrum antiviral strategy against SARS-CoV-2 variants. IMPORTANCE SARS-CoV-2, the causative agent of pandemic COVID-19, is rapidly evolving to be more transmissible and to exhibit evasive immune properties, compromising neutralization by antibodies from vaccinated individuals or convalescent-phase sera. Recently, SARS-CoV-2 variants B.1.617.1 (Kappa), B.1.617.2 (Delta), and B.1.618 with mutations within the spike proteins were identified in India. In this study, we examined cell entry efficiencies of Kappa, Delta, and B.1.618. In addition, the variants, especially the Delta variant, exhibited expanded capabilities to use mouse, marmoset, and koala ACE2 for entry. Convalescent sera from patients infected with nonvariants showed reduced neutralization titers among the Kappa, Delta, and B.1.618 variants. Furthermore, the variants remain sensitive to ACE2-Ig decoy receptor. Our study thus could facilitate understanding how variants have increased transmissibility and evasion of established immunity and also could highlight the use of an ACE2 decoy receptor as a broad-spectrum antiviral strategy against SARS-CoV-2 variants.

4.
Bioengineered ; 13(3): 5480-5508, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1697594

ABSTRACT

The pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the SARS-coronavirus 2(SARS-CoV-2) virus has become the greatest global public health crisis in recent years,and the COVID-19 epidemic is still continuing. However, due to the lack of effectivetherapeutic drugs, the treatment of corona viruses is facing huge challenges. In thiscontext, countries with a tradition of using herbal medicine such as China have beenwidely using herbal medicine for prevention and nonspecific treatment of corona virusesand achieved good responses. In this review, we will introduce the application of herbalmedicine in the treatment of corona virus patients in China and other countries, andreview the progress of related molecular mechanisms and antiviral activity ingredients ofherbal medicine, in order to provide a reference for herbal medicine in the treatment ofcorona viruses. We found that herbal medicines are used in the prevention and fightagainst COVID-19 in countries on all continents. In China, herbal medicine has beenreported to relieve some of the clinical symptoms of mild patients and shorten the length of hospital stay. However, as most herbal medicines for the clinical treatment of COVID-19still lack rigorous clinical trials, the clinical and economic value of herbal medicines in theprevention and treatment of COVID-19 has not been fully evaluated. Future work basedon large-scale randomized, double-blind clinical trials to evaluate herbal medicines andtheir active ingredients in the treatment of new COVID-19 will be very meaningful.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use , Plants, Medicinal/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Antiviral Agents/isolation & purification , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , China , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/isolation & purification , Herbal Medicine/methods , Humans , Medicine, Chinese Traditional/methods , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
5.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-308221

ABSTRACT

Background: Novel coronavirus pneumonia (COVID-19) outbreak caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has rapidly spread over the globe. The knowledge about SARS-CoV-2 infection in immunocompromised patients was limited. Case presentation: We presented here two human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected cases with laboratory confirmed COVID-19 and clinically confirmed COVID-19, respectively. The patients both presented with fever at illness onset and patchy shadows in radiological images of lungs. Laboratory findings revealed leukopenia, lymphopenia and positive anti-HIV antibody. The younger case had a moderate course and was discharged after a 28-day hospitalization. However, the elder case with multiple comorbidities developed dyspnea and died on the fourth day after admission. Conclusions: : Combining our data with two case reports, we summarize that disease course varies in HIV-infected patients with COVID-19. More attention should be paid to the management of these patients. Whether there is any difference about clinical characteristics and prognosis of COVID-19 between HIV-infected and non-HIV infected patients, remains to be further investigated.

6.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 7(1): 44, 2022 02 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1683982

ABSTRACT

The wide transmission and host adaptation of SARS-CoV-2 have led to the rapid accumulation of mutations, posing significant challenges to the effectiveness of vaccines and therapeutic antibodies. Although several neutralizing antibodies were authorized for emergency clinical use, convalescent patients derived natural antibodies are vulnerable to SARS-CoV-2 Spike mutation. Here, we describe the screen of a panel of SARS-CoV-2 receptor-binding domain (RBD) targeted nanobodies (Nbs) from a synthetic library and the design of a biparatopic Nb, named Nb1-Nb2, with tight affinity and super-wide neutralization breadth against multiple SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern. Deep-mutational scanning experiments identify the potential binding epitopes of the Nbs on the RBD and demonstrate that biparatopic Nb1-Nb2 has a strong escape-resistant feature against more than 60 tested RBD amino acid substitutions. Using pseudovirion-based and trans-complementation SARS-CoV-2 tools, we determine that the Nb1-Nb2 broadly neutralizes multiple SARS-CoV-2 variants at sub-nanomolar levels, including Alpha (B.1.1.7), Beta (B.1.351), Gamma (P.1), Delta (B.1.617.2), Lambda (C.37), Kappa (B.1.617.1), and Mu (B.1.621). Furthermore, a heavy-chain antibody is constructed by fusing the human IgG1 Fc to Nb1-Nb2 (designated as Nb1-Nb2-Fc) to improve its neutralization potency, yield, stability, and potential half-life extension. For the new Omicron variant (B.1.1.529) that harbors unprecedented multiple RBD mutations, Nb1-Nb2-Fc keeps a firm affinity (KD < 1.0 × 10-12 M) and strong neutralizing activity (IC50 = 1.46 nM for authentic Omicron virus). Together, we developed a tetravalent biparatopic human heavy-chain antibody with ultrapotent and broad-spectrum SARS-CoV-2 neutralization activity which highlights the potential clinical applications.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/pharmacology , Antibodies, Viral/pharmacology , Immunoglobulin Fc Fragments/pharmacology , Recombinant Fusion Proteins/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Single-Domain Antibodies/pharmacology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/biosynthesis , Antibodies, Neutralizing/genetics , Antibodies, Viral/biosynthesis , Antibodies, Viral/genetics , Antibody Affinity , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Epitopes/chemistry , Epitopes/immunology , Escherichia coli/genetics , Escherichia coli/metabolism , Gene Expression , Humans , Immunoglobulin Fc Fragments/biosynthesis , Immunoglobulin Fc Fragments/genetics , Models, Molecular , Neutralization Tests , Protein Binding/drug effects , Protein Conformation , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , Recombinant Fusion Proteins/biosynthesis , Recombinant Fusion Proteins/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Single-Domain Antibodies/biosynthesis , Single-Domain Antibodies/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/antagonists & inhibitors , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
8.
2021.
Preprint in English | Other preprints | ID: ppcovidwho-296272

ABSTRACT

New SARS-CoV-2 variants continue to emerge from the current global pandemic, some of which can replicate faster and with greater transmissibility and pathogenicity. In particular, UK501Y.V1 identified in UK, SA501Y.V2 in South Africa, and BR501Y.V3 in Brazil are raising serious concerns as they spread quickly and contain spike protein mutations that may facilitate escape from current antibody therapies and vaccine protection. Here, we constructed a panel of 28 SARS-CoV-2 pseudoviruses bearing single or combined mutations found in the spike protein of these three variants, as well as additional nine mutations that within or close by the major antigenic sites in the spike protein identified in the GISAID database. These pseudoviruses were tested against a panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), including some approved for emergency use to treat SARS-CoV-2 infection, and convalescent patient plasma collected early in the pandemic. SA501Y.V2 pseudovirus was the most resistant, in magnitude and breadth, against mAbs and convalescent plasma, followed by BR501Y.V3, and then UK501Y.V1. This resistance hierarchy corresponds with Y144del and 242-244del mutations in the N-terminal domain as well as K417N/T, E484K and N501Y mutations in the receptor binding domain (RBD). Crystal structural analysis of RBD carrying triple K417N-E484K-N501Y mutations found in SA501Y.V2 bound with mAb P2C-1F11 revealed a molecular basis for antibody neutralization and escape. SA501Y.V2 and BR501Y.V3 also acquired substantial ability to use mouse and mink ACE2 for entry. Taken together, our results clearly demonstrate major antigenic shifts and potentially broadening the host range of SA501Y.V2 and BR501Y.V3, which pose serious challenges to our current antibody therapies and vaccine protection.

9.
Bio Protoc ; 11(21): e4257, 2021 Nov 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1527089

ABSTRACT

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). As this virus is classified as a biosafety level-3 (BSL-3) agent, the development of countermeasures and basic research methods is logistically difficult. Recently, using reverse genetics, we developed a BSL-2 cell culture system for production of transcription- and replication-component virus-like-particles (trVLPs) by genetic transcomplementation. The system consists of two parts: SARS-CoV-2 GFP/ΔN genomic RNA, in which the nucleocapsid (N) gene, a critical gene for virion packaging, is replaced by a GFP reporter gene; and a packaging cell line for ectopic expression of N (Caco-2-N). The complete viral life cycle can be recapitulated and confined to Caco-2-N cells, with GFP positivity serving as a surrogate readout for viral infection. In addition, we utilized an intein-mediated protein splicing technique to split the N gene into two independent vectors and generated the Caco-2-Nintein cells as a packaging cell line to further enhance the security of this cell culture model. Altogether, this system provides for a safe and convenient method to produce trVLPs in BSL-2 laboratories. These trVLPs can be modified to incorporate desired mutations, permitting high-throughput screening of antiviral compounds and evaluation of neutralizing antibodies. This protocol describes the details of the trVLP cell culture model to make SARS-CoV-2 research more readily accessible.

10.
PLoS Pathog ; 17(11): e1010053, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506691

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 patients transmitted SARS-CoV-2 to minks in the Netherlands in April 2020. Subsequently, the mink-associated virus (miSARS-CoV-2) spilled back over into humans. Genetic sequences of the miSARS-CoV-2 identified a new genetic variant known as "Cluster 5" that contained mutations in the spike protein. However, the functional properties of these "Cluster 5" mutations have not been well established. In this study, we found that the Y453F mutation located in the RBD domain of miSARS-CoV-2 is an adaptive mutation that enhances binding to mink ACE2 and other orthologs of Mustela species without compromising, and even enhancing, its ability to utilize human ACE2 as a receptor for entry. Structural analysis suggested that despite the similarity in the overall binding mode of SARS-CoV-2 RBD to human and mink ACE2, Y34 of mink ACE2 was better suited to interact with a Phe rather than a Tyr at position 453 of the viral RBD due to less steric clash and tighter hydrophobic-driven interaction. Additionally, the Y453F spike exhibited resistance to convalescent serum, posing a risk for vaccine development. Thus, our study suggests that since the initial transmission from humans, SARS-CoV-2 evolved to adapt to the mink host, leading to widespread circulation among minks while still retaining its ability to efficiently utilize human ACE2 for entry, thus allowing for transmission of the miSARS-CoV-2 back into humans. These findings underscore the importance of active surveillance of SARS-CoV-2 evolution in Mustela species and other susceptible hosts in order to prevent future outbreaks.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/epidemiology , Host Adaptation , Mink/immunology , Mutation , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Adult , Aged , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Animals , Binding Sites , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Immunization, Passive/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Mink/virology , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Netherlands/epidemiology , Protein Binding , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Virus Internalization , Young Adult
11.
Cell Res ; 32(1): 9-23, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1505077

ABSTRACT

In contrast to the extensive research about viral protein-host protein interactions that has revealed major insights about how RNA viruses engage with host cells during infection, few studies have examined interactions between host factors and viral RNAs (vRNAs). Here, we profiled vRNA-host protein interactomes for three RNA virus pathogens (SARS-CoV-2, Zika, and Ebola viruses) using ChIRP-MS. Comparative interactome analyses discovered both common and virus-specific host responses and vRNA-associated proteins that variously promote or restrict viral infection. In particular, SARS-CoV-2 binds and hijacks the host factor IGF2BP1 to stabilize vRNA and augment viral translation. Our interactome-informed drug repurposing efforts identified several FDA-approved drugs (e.g., Cepharanthine) as broad-spectrum antivirals in cells and hACE2 transgenic mice. A co-treatment comprising Cepharanthine and Trifluoperazine was highly potent against the newly emerged SARS-CoV-2 B.1.351 variant. Thus, our study illustrates the scientific and medical discovery utility of adopting a comparative vRNA-host protein interactome perspective.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , RNA Viruses , Zika Virus Infection , Zika Virus , Animals , Antiviral Agents , Humans , Mice , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2 , Viral Proteins
13.
J Virol ; 96(1): e0149221, 2022 01 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1476391

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has resulted in more than 235 million cases worldwide and 4.8 million deaths (October 2021), with various incidences and mortalities among regions/ethnicities. The coronaviruses SARS-CoV, SARS-CoV-2, and HCoV-NL63 utilize the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) as the receptor to enter cells. We hypothesized that the genetic variability in ACE2 may contribute to the variable clinical outcomes of COVID-19. To test this hypothesis, we first conducted an in silico investigation of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the coding region of ACE2. We then applied an integrated approach of genetics, biochemistry, and virology to explore the capacity of select ACE2 variants to bind coronavirus spike proteins and mediate viral entry. We identified the ACE2 D355N variant that restricts the spike protein-ACE2 interaction and consequently limits infection both in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, ACE2 polymorphisms could modulate susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2, which may lead to variable disease severity. IMPORTANCE There is considerable variation in disease severity among patients infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Human genetic variation can affect disease outcome, and the coronaviruses SARS-CoV, SARS-CoV-2, and HCoV-NL63 utilize human ACE2 as the receptor to enter cells. We found that several missense ACE2 single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) that showed significantly altered binding with the spike proteins of SARS-CoV, SARS-CoV-2, and NL63-HCoV. We identified an ACE2 SNP, D355N, that restricts the spike protein-ACE2 interaction and consequently has the potential to protect individuals against SARS-CoV-2 infection. Our study highlights that ACE2 polymorphisms could impact human susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2, which may contribute to ethnic and geographical differences in SARS-CoV-2 spread and pathogenicity.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Genetic Variation , Humans , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Protein Binding , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Virus Internalization
14.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 250, 2021 01 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387324

ABSTRACT

Understanding the mechanism for antibody neutralization of SARS-CoV-2 is critical for the development of effective therapeutics and vaccines. We recently isolated a large number of monoclonal antibodies from SARS-CoV-2 infected individuals. Here we select the top three most potent yet variable neutralizing antibodies for in-depth structural and functional analyses. Crystal structural comparisons reveal differences in the angles of approach to the receptor binding domain (RBD), the size of the buried surface areas, and the key binding residues on the RBD of the viral spike glycoprotein. One antibody, P2C-1F11, most closely mimics binding of receptor ACE2, displays the most potent neutralizing activity in vitro and conferred strong protection against SARS-CoV-2 infection in Ad5-hACE2-sensitized mice. It also occupies the largest binding surface and demonstrates the highest binding affinity to RBD. More interestingly, P2C-1F11 triggers rapid and extensive shedding of S1 from the cell-surface expressed spike glycoprotein, with only minimal such effect by the remaining two antibodies. These results offer a structural and functional basis for potent neutralization via disruption of the very first and critical steps for SARS-CoV-2 cell entry.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Antibodies, Monoclonal/chemistry , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Binding Sites , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Disease Models, Animal , Epitopes , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Models, Molecular , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation , Receptors, Virus/immunology , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Virus Internalization
16.
Cell Rep ; 36(5): 109482, 2021 08 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1312984

ABSTRACT

Bearing a relatively large single-stranded RNA genome in nature, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) utilizes sophisticated replication/transcription complexes (RTCs), mainly composed of a network of nonstructural proteins and nucleocapsid protein, to establish efficient infection. In this study, we develop an innovative interaction screening strategy based on phase separation in cellulo, namely compartmentalization of protein-protein interactions in cells (CoPIC). Utilizing CoPIC screening, we map the interaction network among RTC-related viral proteins. We identify a total of 47 binary interactions among 14 proteins governing replication, discontinuous transcription, and translation of coronaviruses. Further exploration via CoPIC leads to the discovery of extensive ternary complexes composed of these components, which infer potential higher-order complexes. Taken together, our results present an efficient and robust interaction screening strategy, and they indicate the existence of a complex interaction network among RTC-related factors, thus opening up opportunities to understand SARS-CoV-2 biology and develop therapeutic interventions for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Protein Interaction Mapping/methods , Proteome , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/physiology , Animals , Caco-2 Cells , Cell Compartmentation , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Protein Interaction Maps , Vero Cells , Virus Replication
17.
Immunity ; 54(7): 1611-1621.e5, 2021 07 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1260761

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variants continue to emerge during the global pandemic and may facilitate escape from current antibody therapies and vaccine protection. Here we showed that the South African variant B.1.351 was the most resistant to current monoclonal antibodies and convalescent plasma from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-infected individuals, followed by the Brazilian variant P.1 and the United Kingdom variant B.1.1.7. This resistance hierarchy corresponded with Y144del and 242-244del mutations in the N-terminal domain and K417N/T, E484K, and N501Y mutations in the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of SARS-CoV-2. Crystal structure analysis of the B.1.351 triple mutant (417N-484K-501Y) RBD complexed with the monoclonal antibody P2C-1F11 revealed the molecular basis for antibody neutralization and escape. B.1.351 and P.1 also acquired the ability to use mouse and mink ACE2 receptors for entry. Our results demonstrate major antigenic shifts and potential broadening of the host range for B.1.351 and P.1 variants, which poses serious challenges to current antibody therapies and vaccine protection.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Immune Evasion , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal/chemistry , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/chemistry , Antigenic Variation/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Host Specificity , Humans , Immune Evasion/genetics , Mice , Mink , Mutation , Protein Binding , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Virus Internalization
18.
PLoS Pathog ; 17(3): e1009392, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1148252

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus interaction with its viral receptor is a primary genetic determinant of host range and tissue tropism. SARS-CoV-2 utilizes ACE2 as the receptor to enter host cell in a species-specific manner. We and others have previously shown that ACE2 orthologs from New World monkey, koala and mouse cannot interact with SARS-CoV-2 to mediate viral entry, and this defect can be restored by humanization of the restrictive residues in New World monkey ACE2. To better understand the genetic determinants behind the ability of ACE2 orthologs to support viral entry, we compared koala and mouse ACE2 sequences with that of human and identified the key residues in koala and mouse ACE2 that restrict viral receptor activity. Humanization of these critical residues rendered both koala and mouse ACE2 capable of binding the spike protein and facilitating viral entry. Our study shed more lights into the genetic determinants of ACE2 as the functional receptor of SARS-CoV-2, which facilitates our understanding of viral entry.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/enzymology , COVID-19/genetics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Receptors, Virus/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Animals , Base Sequence , COVID-19/virology , Host Specificity , Humans , Mice/genetics , Mice/virology , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/chemistry , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Phascolarctidae/genetics , Phascolarctidae/virology , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Sequence Alignment , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Virus Internalization
19.
PLoS Pathog ; 17(3): e1009439, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1133695

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causes the global pandemic of COVID-19. SARS-CoV-2 is classified as a biosafety level-3 (BSL-3) agent, impeding the basic research into its biology and the development of effective antivirals. Here, we developed a biosafety level-2 (BSL-2) cell culture system for production of transcription and replication-competent SARS-CoV-2 virus-like-particles (trVLP). This trVLP expresses a reporter gene (GFP) replacing viral nucleocapsid gene (N), which is required for viral genome packaging and virion assembly (SARS-CoV-2 GFP/ΔN trVLP). The complete viral life cycle can be achieved and exclusively confined in the cells ectopically expressing SARS-CoV or SARS-CoV-2 N proteins, but not MERS-CoV N. Genetic recombination of N supplied in trans into viral genome was not detected, as evidenced by sequence analysis after one-month serial passages in the N-expressing cells. Moreover, intein-mediated protein trans-splicing approach was utilized to split the viral N gene into two independent vectors, and the ligated viral N protein could function in trans to recapitulate entire viral life cycle, further securing the biosafety of this cell culture model. Based on this BSL-2 SARS-CoV-2 cell culture model, we developed a 96-well format high throughput screening for antivirals discovery. We identified salinomycin, tubeimoside I, monensin sodium, lycorine chloride and nigericin sodium as potent antivirals against SARS-CoV-2 infection. Collectively, we developed a convenient and efficient SARS-CoV-2 reverse genetics tool to dissect the virus life cycle under a BSL-2 condition. This powerful tool should accelerate our understanding of SARS-CoV-2 biology and its antiviral development.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Cell Culture Techniques/methods , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Containment of Biohazards , Genome, Viral/drug effects , High-Throughput Screening Assays , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , Virus Replication/drug effects
20.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(12)2021 03 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1117490

ABSTRACT

The pandemic of COVID-19, caused by SARS-CoV-2, is a major global health threat. Epidemiological studies suggest that bats (Rhinolophus affinis) are the natural zoonotic reservoir for SARS-CoV-2. However, the host range of SARS-CoV-2 and intermediate hosts that facilitate its transmission to humans remain unknown. The interaction of coronavirus with its host receptor is a key genetic determinant of host range and cross-species transmission. SARS-CoV-2 uses angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) as the receptor to enter host cells in a species-dependent manner. In this study, we characterized the ability of ACE2 from diverse species to support viral entry. By analyzing the conservation of five residues in two virus-binding hotspots of ACE2 (hotspot 31Lys and hotspot 353Lys), we predicted 80 ACE2 proteins from mammals that could potentially mediate SARS-CoV-2 entry. We chose 48 ACE2 orthologs among them for functional analysis, and showed that 44 of these orthologs-including domestic animals, pets, livestock, and animals commonly found in zoos and aquaria-could bind the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and support viral entry. In contrast, New World monkey ACE2 orthologs could not bind the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and support viral entry. We further identified the genetic determinant of New World monkey ACE2 that restricts viral entry using genetic and functional analyses. These findings highlight a potentially broad host tropism of SARS-CoV-2 and suggest that SARS-CoV-2 might be distributed much more widely than previously recognized, underscoring the necessity to monitor susceptible hosts to prevent future outbreaks.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , COVID-19/veterinary , Receptors, Virus/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Host Specificity , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Phylogeny , Protein Binding , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Viral Tropism , Viral Zoonoses/genetics , Viral Zoonoses/prevention & control , Viral Zoonoses/virology , Virus Attachment , Virus Internalization
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