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New Zealand Journal of Psychology ; 51(1):10-27, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2169023

ABSTRACT

Is it possible to predict COVID-19 vaccination status prior to the existence and availability of COVID-19 vaccines? Here, we present a logistic model by regressing decisions to vaccinate in late 2021 on lagged sociodemographic, health, social, and political indicators from 2019 in a sample of New Zealand adults aged between 18 and 94 (M-age = 52.92, SD = 14.10;62.21% women;N = 5324). We explain 31% of the variance in decision making across New Zealand. Significant predictors of being unvaccinated were being younger, more deprived, reporting less satisfaction with general practitioners, lower levels of neuroticism, greater levels of subjective health and meaning in life, higher distrust in science and in the police, lower satisfaction in the government, as well as political conservatism. Additional cross-sectional models specified using the same, and additional COVID-19-specific factors are also presented. These findings reveal that vaccination decisions are neither artefacts of context nor chance, but rather can be predicted in advance of the availability of vaccines.

2.
Journal of Social and Political Psychology ; 10(1):323-334, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2025248

ABSTRACT

Polling data indicate that in the USA, Republicans, compared to Democrats, have been less inclined to take preventive measures against coronavirus. In three studies (Ns = 380, 430, and 393), we sought to find evidence for partisan motivations and to illuminate how they translate into attitudes, behavioral intentions and actual behaviors. Results revealed a consensus that the Democratic party wants people take coronavirus seriously. Thus, while Democrats thought it was aligned with their political interests, Republicans thought it was in their opponents??? interests. Further analyses suggest that perceived party interests mediated the effect of party allegiance on attitudes about the seriousness of coronavirus, and both attitudes and intentions to preventive behaviors (Studies 1 and 2) and specifically attitudes and intentions to wear masks (Study 3). This relationship also held for mask-wearing behavior. Results suggest that people???s responses to coronavirus may reflect a conformity to the perceived wishes and interests of their political party.

3.
Journal of Pacific Rim Psychology ; 15:8, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1582517

ABSTRACT

Understanding why people believe conspiracy theories related to disease outbreaks and the consequences of such beliefs is critical for combating both the COVID-19 pandemic and its corresponding "infodemic." In the introduction to this special issue on conspiracy theories about infectious diseases, the authors first provide a brief overview of the narratives of conspiracy theories related to COVID-19, followed by a review of extant theoretical frameworks regarding the psychology of conspiracy beliefs. Specifically, they discuss how epistemic, existential, and social needs contribute to the holding of conspiracy beliefs. Then, the authors summarize the major findings from the nine empirical articles featured in this issue, particularly how they shed light on the antecedents and consequences of disease-related conspiracy beliefs. They conclude by discussing future directions for the study of disease-related conspiracy beliefs.

4.
Rheumatology (United Kingdom) ; 60(SUPPL 1):i76, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1266184

ABSTRACT

Background/AimsBaricitinib is an oral, reversible and selective inhibitor of JAK1 andJAK2 tyrosine kinases. It was approved for use in 2017 by NICE for thetreatment of moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Consideringthe current risk of COVID-19, the BSR have advocated the use ofshort-acting drugs such as baricitinib when escalating treatment in RA.As real-world data is limited, we aimed to explore the efficacy ofbaricitinib in clinical practice.MethodsObservational data was collected retrospectively for patients at theDudley Group NHSFT with RA (ACR/EULAR criteria) who had receivedat least one dose of baricitinib prior to 1st October 2019, with a followup period to 1st October 2020. Patients were identified from a localbiologics database. Further data was identified from patients' medicalrecords including, demographics, features of RA, previous RA therapyhistory and disease activity scores (DAS28) at 0, 6 and 12 months.Data was input into an Excel spreadsheet with subsequent analysisconducted using SPSS Version26.ResultsWe identified 26 RA patients (77% female) treated with baricitinib;mean age 61.6 (SD 14.6) years and median disease duration of 12.1(IQR 5.8-18.4) years. Rheumatoid factor and anti-CCP antibody werepositive in 73% and 65% respectively. 35% (n = 9) of patients werebiologically naïve, in whom baricitinib was chosen due to needlephobia (n = 7), or where anti-TNF drugs were considered inappropriate(bronchiectasis, ANA positivity). Mean DAS28 (SD) scores at baseline, 6 and 12 months were 5.9(0.8), 2.8(0.9) and 2.7(1.3) respectively, withsignificant reduction from baseline to both 6 and 12 months(P < 0.001). A drop of 1.2 in DAS28 was recorded in 94% of patientswith complete data at 6 months (n = 18, 4 missing, 4 discontinued). At6 and 12 months, 85% and 81% of patients remained on Baricitinib. Intotal five patients discontinued Baricitinib due to side effects ortolerability issues. Reasons for discontinuation did not includethromboembolic events, zoster or serious infections. When comparingnaïve and non-naïve groups, there was no significant difference in age, sex or disease duration. The number of previous biologics used bypatients were 1(n = 6), 2(n = 3), 3(n = 8). Biologically naive comparedto non-naïve patients had a higher DAS28 at baseline, (Mean [SD])(6.2[0.9] versus 5.7[0.8] NS) but lower at 6 months (2.1[1.6] versus3.1[1.1] P = 0.023) and greater DAS improvement at 6months (-4.4[1.2]versus -2.5[0.9] P < 0.002).ConclusionWe observed that up to 94% of patients responded to baricitinib with amean DAS improvement at 6 months of -3.1, biologic naïve patientsdoing best. Drug survival at 12 months was 81%. These trends arecomparable to findings in clinical trials. However, due to our smallsample size, the findings are vulnerable to type 1 and 2 errors andshould be interpreted with caution.

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