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1.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(11): e4154-e4165, 2021 12 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1559099

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Children and older adults with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) display a distinct spectrum of disease severity yet the risk factors aren't well understood. We sought to examine the expression pattern of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), the cell-entry receptor for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), and the role of lung progenitor cells in children and older patients. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed clinical features in a cohort of 299 patients with COVID-19. The expression and distribution of ACE2 and lung progenitor cells were systematically examined using a combination of public single-cell RNA-seq data sets, lung biopsies, and ex vivo infection of lung tissues with SARS-CoV-2 pseudovirus in children and older adults. We also followed up patients who had recovered from COVID-19. RESULTS: Compared with children, older patients (>50 years.) were more likely to develop into serious pneumonia with reduced lymphocytes and aberrant inflammatory response (P = .001). The expression level of ACE2 and lung progenitor cell markers were generally decreased in older patients. Notably, ACE2 positive cells were mainly distributed in the alveolar region, including SFTPC positive cells, but rarely in airway regions in the older adults (P < .01). The follow-up of discharged patients revealed a prolonged recovery from pneumonia in the older (P < .025). CONCLUSIONS: Compared to children, ACE2 positive cells are generally decreased in older adults and mainly presented in the lower pulmonary tract. The lung progenitor cells are also decreased. These risk factors may impact disease severity and recovery from pneumonia caused by SARS-Cov-2 infection in older patients.

2.
Allergy ; 76(2): 510-532, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1140081

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection has made widespread impact recently. We aim to investigate the clinical characteristics of COVID-19 children with different severities and allergic status. METHODS: Data extracted from the electronic medical records, including demographics, clinical manifestations, comorbidities, laboratory and immunological results, and radiological images of 182 hospitalized COVID-19 children, were summarized and analyzed. RESULTS: The median age was 6 years, ranging from 3 days to 15 years, and there were more boys (male-female ratio about 2:1) within the studied 182 patients. Most of the children were infected by family members. Fever (43.4%) and dry cough (44.5%) were common symptoms, and gastrointestinal manifestations accounted for 11.0%, including diarrhea, abdominal discomfort, and vomiting. 71.4% had abnormal chest computed tomography (CT) scan images, and typical signs of pneumonia were ground-glass opacity and local patchy shadowing on admission. Laboratory results were mostly within normal ranges, and only a small ratio of lymphopenia (3.9%) and eosinopenia (29.5%) were observed. The majority (97.8%) of infected children were not severe, and 24 (13.2%) of them had asymptomatic infections. Compared to children without pneumonia (manifested as asymptomatic and acute upper respiratory infection), children with pneumonia were associated with higher percentages of the comorbidity history, symptoms of fever and cough, and increased levels of serum procalcitonin, alkaline phosphatase, and serum interleukins (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α. There were no differences in treatments, duration of hospitalization, time from first positive to first negative nucleic acid testing, and outcomes between children with mild pneumonia and without pneumonia. All the hospitalized COVID-19 children had recovered except one death due to intussusception and sepsis. In 43 allergic children with COVID-19, allergic rhinitis (83.7%) was the major disease, followed by drug allergy, atopic dermatitis, food allergy, and asthma. Demographics and clinical features were not significantly different between allergic and nonallergic groups. Allergic patients showed less increase in acute phase reactants, procalcitonin, D-dimer, and aspartate aminotransferase levels compared with all patients. Immunological profiles including circulating T, B, and NK lymphocyte subsets, total immunoglobulin and complement levels, and serum cytokines did not show any difference in allergic and pneumonia groups. Neither eosinophil counts nor serum total immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels showed a significant correlation with other immunological measures, such as other immunoglobulins, complements, lymphocyte subset numbers, and serum cytokine levels. CONCLUSION: Pediatric COVID-19 patients tended to have a mild clinical course. Patients with pneumonia had higher proportion of fever and cough and increased inflammatory biomarkers than those without pneumonia. There was no difference between allergic and nonallergic COVID-19 children in disease incidence, clinical features, and laboratory and immunological findings. Allergy was not a risk factor for developing and severity of SARS-CoV-2 infection and hardly influenced the disease course of COVID-19 in children.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Hypersensitivity/epidemiology , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Incidence , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(11): e24315, 2021 Mar 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1138005

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Since the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Wuhan, considerable attention has been paid on its epidemiology and clinical characteristics in children patients. However, it is also crucial for clinicians to summarize and investigate the co-infection of SARS-CoV-2 in children.We retrospectively reviewed the clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, and imaging characteristics of COVID-19 patients in co-infection group (CI, n = 27) and single infection group (SI, n = 54). Samples were tested for multiple pathogens.A high incidence (27/81, 33%) of co-infection in children with COVID-19 was revealed. The most frequent co-infected pathogen was mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP, 20/81, 25%), followed by virus (6/81, 7%), and bacteria (4/81, 5%). No significant difference in clinical characteristics, laboratory examinations, or hospital stay was observed between the patients with co-infections and those with monomicrobial, only lower in white blood cell counts (CI: 5.54 ±â€Š0.36 vs SI: 7.38 ±â€Š0.37, P = .002), neutrophil counts (CI: 2.20 ±â€Š0.20 vs SI: 2.92 ±â€Š0.23, P = .024) and lymphocyte counts (CI: 2.72 ±â€Š0.024 vs SI: 3.87 ±â€Š0.28, P = .006). Compared with the patients with monomicrobial, chest imaging of those with co-infections showed consolidation in more cases (CI: 29.6% vs SI: 11.1%, P = .038) and duration of positive in nucleic acid was shorter (CI: 6.69 ±â€Š0.82 vs SI: 9.69 ±â€Š0.74, P = .015).Co-infection was relatively common in children with COVID-19, almost 1/3 had co-infection, most commonly caused by MP. Co-infection did not cause a significant exacerbation in clinical manifestations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Coinfection/epidemiology , Adenoviridae Infections/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Coinfection/microbiology , Coinfection/virology , Female , Humans , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Leukocyte Count , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Moraxellaceae Infections/epidemiology , Mycoplasma pneumoniae , Pneumococcal Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Mycoplasma/epidemiology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
4.
J Psychiatr Res ; 137: 393-400, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1135471

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has imposed both physical and psychological burdens on healthcare workers (HCWs). What is more, few studies have focused on the gender differences in mental health problems (MHPs) among HCWs during such an outbreak. Thus, the current study investigated the prevalence and gender differences of various MHPs among HCWs in China during the COVID-19 outbreak. This nationwide survey was conducted online from January 29 to February 3, 2020. General information was collected by questions about socio-demographics, work-related factors, and living situations. Depressive, anxiety, stress, and insomnia symptoms were assessed by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7, the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, and the Insomnia Severity Index, respectively. Among the 2198 contacted HCWs, 1563 (71.1%) responded with valid data, of whom 1293 (82.7%) were females. The prevalences of depressive, anxiety, stress, and insomnia symptoms in participants were 50.7%, 44.7%, 52.5%, and 36.1%, respectively. Female HCWs had significantly higher scores in all four scales (p < 0.001) and higher prevalences in all MHPs involved (range, odds ratio [OR] 1.55-1.97). After adjusting for potential confounders, female HCWs still had higher risks for all MHPs involved than males (range, adjusted OR 1.36-1.96). HCWs present high prevalences of depressive, anxiety, stress, and insomnia symptoms during the COVID-19 outbreak. Furthermore, female HCWs are more vulnerable to all MHPs involved. These findings highlight the need for timely, special care and support for HCWs during the outbreak, especially for females.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Sex Factors , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Young Adult
6.
Theranostics ; 11(5): 2170-2181, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1016389

ABSTRACT

Introduction: An increasing number of children with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is being reported, yet the spectrum of disease severity and expression patterns of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) in children at different developmental stages are largely unknow. Methods: We analysed clinical features in a cohort of 173 children with COVID-19 (0-15 yrs.-old) between January 22, 2020 and March 15, 2020. We systematically examined the expression and distribution of ACE2 in different developmental stages of children by using a combination of children's lung biopsies, pluripotent stem cell-derived lung cells, RNA-sequencing profiles, and ex vivo SARS-CoV-2 pseudoviral infections. Results: It revealed that infants (< 1yrs.-old), with a weaker potency of immune response, are more vulnerable to develop pneumonia whereas older children (> 1 yrs.-old) are more resistant to lung injury. The expression levels of ACE2 however do not vary by age in children's lung. ACE2 is notably expressed not only in Alveolar Type II (AT II) cells, but also in SOX9 positive lung progenitor cells detected in both pluripotent stem cell derivatives and infants' lungs. The ACE2+SOX9+ cells are readily infected by SARS-CoV-2 pseudovirus and the numbers of the double positive cells are significantly decreased in older children. Conclusions: Infants (< 1 yrs.-old) with SARS-CoV-2 infection are more vulnerable to lung injuries. ACE2 expression in multiple types of lung cells including SOX9 positive progenitor cells, in cooperation with an unestablished immune system, could be risk factors contributing to vulnerability of infants with COVID-19. There is a need to continue monitoring lung development in young children who have recovered from SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Lung/cytology , Stem Cells/metabolism , Adolescent , Biopsy , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Immune System , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Lung/virology , Male , RNA-Seq , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , SOX9 Transcription Factor/metabolism , Single-Cell Analysis , Stem Cells/virology
8.
Transl Psychiatry ; 10(1): 348, 2020 10 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-867547

ABSTRACT

To study the acute psychological effects of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak among healthcare workers (HCWs) in China, a cross-sectional survey was conducted among HCWs during the early period of COVID-19 outbreak. The acute psychological effects including symptoms of depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), the Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7) questionnaire, and the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R). The prevalence of depression, anxiety, and PTSD was estimated at 15.0%, 27.1%, and 9.8%, respectively. Having an intermediate technical title, working at the frontline, receiving insufficient training for protection, and lacking confidence in protection measures were significantly associated with increased risk for depression and anxiety. Being a nurse, having an intermediate technical title, working at the frontline, and lacking confidence in protection measures were risk factors for PTSD. Meanwhile, not worrying about infection was a protective factor for developing depression, anxiety, and PTSD. Psychological interventions should be implemented among HCWs during the COVID-19 outbreak to reduce acute psychological effects and prevent long-term psychological comorbidities. Meanwhile, HCWs should be well trained and well protected before their frontline exposure.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Acute Disease , Adult , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Surveys/methods , Health Surveys/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Preprint | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-532

ABSTRACT

Background: The outbreak of 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) caused not only extraordinary public health concerns but also tremendous psychological dis

12.
Zhongguo dang dai er ke za zhi = Chinese journal of contemporary pediatrics ; 22(6):578-582, 2020.
Article | WHO COVID | ID: covidwho-613348

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To study the clinical features of asymptomatic or subclinical coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in children. METHODS: A retrospective analysis was performed for the clinical data of 53 children who were confirmed with asymptomatic or subclinical COVID-19, including epidemiological history, clinical typing, co-infection, time to clearance of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) nucleic acid in nasopharyngeal swabs, laboratory examination results, length of hospital stay, and treatment outcome. RESULTS: The children with asymptomatic or subclinical COVID-19 accounted for 30.5% (53/174) in children with COVID-19 hospitalized in the COVID-19 ward of Wuhan Children's Hospital. All cases occurred with familial aggregation. Among the 53 children, 35 (66%) had asymptomatic infection and 18 (34%) had subclinical infection. Mycoplasma infection was found in 17 children (32%). For the 53 children, the mean time to clearance of SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid in nasopharyngeal swabs was 9+/-4 days. Most laboratory markers were maintained within the normal range. The mean hospital stay was 11+/-4 days. Lung CT of 18 children with subclinical COVID-19 showed ground-glass opacities, linear opacities, and patchy opacities, with relatively limited lesions. CONCLUSIONS: There is a high proportion of children with asymptomatic or subclinical COVID-19 among the children with COVID-19 hospitalized in the COVID-19 ward. The transmission risk of asymptomatic or subclinical COVID-19 should be taken seriously.

13.
Int J Infect Dis ; 98: 80-83, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-597827

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the outbreak of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Wuhan, considerable attention has been paid to its epidemiology and clinical characteristics in children. However, it is also crucial for clinicians to differentiate COVID-19 from other respiratory infectious diseases, such as influenza viruses. METHODS: This was a retrospective study. Two groups of COVID-19 patients (n=57) and influenza A patients (n=59) were enrolled. We analyzed and compared their clinical manifestations, imaging characteristics and treatments. RESULTS: The proportions of cough (70.2%), fever (54.4%) and gastrointestinal symptoms (14.1%) in COVID-19 patients were lower than those of influenza A patients (98.3%, P<0.001; 84.7%, P<0.001; and 35.6%, P=0.007; respectively). In addition, COVID-19 patients showed significantly lower levels of leukocytes (7.87 vs. 9.89×109L-1, P=0.027), neutrophils (2.43 vs. 5.16×109L-1, P<0.001), C-reactive protein (CRP; 3.7 vs. 15.1mg/L, P=0.001) and procalcitonin (PCT; 0.09 vs. 0.68mm/h, P<0.001), while lymphocyte levels (4.58 vs. 3.56×109L-1; P=0.006) were significantly higher compared with influenza A patients. In terms of CT imaging, ground-glass opacification in chest CT was more common in COVID-19 patients than in influenza A patients (42.1% vs. 15%, P=0.032). In contrast, consolidation was more common in influenza A patients (25%) than in COVID-19 patients (5.2%, P=0.025). CONCLUSION: The clinical manifestations and laboratory tests of COVID-19 children are milder than those of influenza A children under 5 years. Additionally, imaging results more commonly presented as ground-glass opacities in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Influenza, Human/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19 , Child, Preschool , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cough/etiology , Female , Fever/etiology , Hospitalization , Humans , Infant , Influenza, Human/complications , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Male , Neutrophils , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
14.
Front Psychiatry ; 11: 306, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-151710

ABSTRACT

Objective: The outbreak of the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) not only caused particularly large public health problems, but also caused great psychological distress, especially for medical staff. We aimed to investigate the prevalence rate of insomnia and to confirm the related social psychological factors among medical staff in hospitals during the COVID-19 outbreak. Method: Medical staff members in China were recruited, including frontline medical workers. The questionnaire, administered through the WeChat program, obtained demographic data and asked self-design questions related to the COVID-19 outbreak, insomnia/depressive/anxiety symptoms, and stress-related symptoms. We used a logistic regression analysis to examine the associations between sociodemographic factors and insomnia symptoms. Result: There were a total of 1,563 participants in our study. Five-hundred-and-sixty-four (36.1%) participants had insomnia symptoms according to the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) (total score ≥ 8). A multiple binary logistic regression model revealed that insomnia symptoms were associated with an education level of high school or below (OR = 2.69, p = 0.042, 95% CI = 1.0-7.0), being a doctor (OR = 0.44, p = 0.007, 95% CI = 0.2-0.8), currently working in an isolation unit (OR = 1.71, p = 0.038, 95% CI = 1.0-2.8), is worried about being infected (OR = 2.30, p < 0.001, 95% CI = 1.6-3.4), perceived lack of helpfulness in terms of psychological support from news or social media with regard to COVID-19 (OR = 2.10, p = 0.001, 95% CI = 1.3-3.3), and having very strong uncertainty regarding effective disease control (OR = 3.30, p = 0.013, 95% CI = 1.3-8.5). Conclusion: Our study found that more than one-third of the medical staff suffered insomnia symptoms during the COVID-19 outbreak. The related factors included education level, an isolation environment, psychological worries about the COVID-19 outbreak, and being a doctor. Interventions for insomnia among medical staff are needed considering the various sociopsychological factors at play in this situation.

15.
Allergy ; 75(7): 1546-1554, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-116569
16.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol ; 31(5): 449-453, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-116502

ABSTRACT

In December 2019, a cluster of patients with severe pneumonia caused by a novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) emerged in the city of Wuhan, China. The disease is now termed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In the early reports, the patients were mainly middle-aged and elderly men, and children appeared to be less susceptible to this infection. With modern and efficient transportation, the disease quickly spread to almost all corners of the world and the mortality far exceeds that caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus or Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus. As the number of children with COVID-19 gradually increases, the disease has been documented in premature babies, infants, children, and adolescents. Severe and fatal cases in children are relatively rare. The burden of disease in children has been relatively low, but the high proportions of asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic infections in children deserve careful attention. A clear understanding of the immune responses to the virus in children and the transmission potential of asymptomatic children is of paramount importance for the development of specific treatments and vaccine in order to effectively control the ongoing pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pediatrics/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Adolescent , COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , Infant , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Pediatr Infect Dis J ; 39(6): e69-e70, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-53033

ABSTRACT

Since December 2019, novel coronavirus-infected pneumonia (coronavirus disease 19) occurred in Wuhan and rapidly spread throughout China and beyond. During this period, increasing of reports found that several recovered patients from different hospitals showed positive results of nucleic acid test again soon after discharge. However, little attention has been paid to recovered children. Herein, we reported a case of 8-year-old recovered child, who was rehospitalized again because of unexplained fever.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Patient Readmission , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Child , China , Fever , Humans , Male , Pandemics , RNA, Viral/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2
18.
JAMA Netw Open ; 3(3): e203976, 2020 03 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-11724

ABSTRACT

Importance: Health care workers exposed to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) could be psychologically stressed. Objective: To assess the magnitude of mental health outcomes and associated factors among health care workers treating patients exposed to COVID-19 in China. Design, Settings, and Participants: This cross-sectional, survey-based, region-stratified study collected demographic data and mental health measurements from 1257 health care workers in 34 hospitals from January 29, 2020, to February 3, 2020, in China. Health care workers in hospitals equipped with fever clinics or wards for patients with COVID-19 were eligible. Main Outcomes and Measures: The degree of symptoms of depression, anxiety, insomnia, and distress was assessed by the Chinese versions of the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire, the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale, the 7-item Insomnia Severity Index, and the 22-item Impact of Event Scale-Revised, respectively. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with mental health outcomes. Results: A total of 1257 of 1830 contacted individuals completed the survey, with a participation rate of 68.7%. A total of 813 (64.7%) were aged 26 to 40 years, and 964 (76.7%) were women. Of all participants, 764 (60.8%) were nurses, and 493 (39.2%) were physicians; 760 (60.5%) worked in hospitals in Wuhan, and 522 (41.5%) were frontline health care workers. A considerable proportion of participants reported symptoms of depression (634 [50.4%]), anxiety (560 [44.6%]), insomnia (427 [34.0%]), and distress (899 [71.5%]). Nurses, women, frontline health care workers, and those working in Wuhan, China, reported more severe degrees of all measurements of mental health symptoms than other health care workers (eg, median [IQR] Patient Health Questionnaire scores among physicians vs nurses: 4.0 [1.0-7.0] vs 5.0 [2.0-8.0]; P = .007; median [interquartile range {IQR}] Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale scores among men vs women: 2.0 [0-6.0] vs 4.0 [1.0-7.0]; P < .001; median [IQR] Insomnia Severity Index scores among frontline vs second-line workers: 6.0 [2.0-11.0] vs 4.0 [1.0-8.0]; P < .001; median [IQR] Impact of Event Scale-Revised scores among those in Wuhan vs those in Hubei outside Wuhan and those outside Hubei: 21.0 [8.5-34.5] vs 18.0 [6.0-28.0] in Hubei outside Wuhan and 15.0 [4.0-26.0] outside Hubei; P < .001). Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed participants from outside Hubei province were associated with lower risk of experiencing symptoms of distress compared with those in Wuhan (odds ratio [OR], 0.62; 95% CI, 0.43-0.88; P = .008). Frontline health care workers engaged in direct diagnosis, treatment, and care of patients with COVID-19 were associated with a higher risk of symptoms of depression (OR, 1.52; 95% CI, 1.11-2.09; P = .01), anxiety (OR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.22-2.02; P < .001), insomnia (OR, 2.97; 95% CI, 1.92-4.60; P < .001), and distress (OR, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.25-2.04; P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: In this survey of heath care workers in hospitals equipped with fever clinics or wards for patients with COVID-19 in Wuhan and other regions in China, participants reported experiencing psychological burden, especially nurses, women, those in Wuhan, and frontline health care workers directly engaged in the diagnosis, treatment, and care for patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/etiology , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Depression/etiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Health , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Adult , Anxiety Disorders , COVID-19 , China , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
Allergy ; 75(7): 1699-1709, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-11481

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection has recently spread worldwide and been declared a pandemic. We aim to describe here the various clinical presentations of this disease by examining eleven cases. METHODS: Electronic medical records of 11 patients with COVID-19 were collected, and demographics, clinical manifestations, outcomes, key laboratory results, and radiological images are discussed. RESULTS: The clinical course of the eleven cases demonstrated the complexity of the COVID-19 profile with different clinical presentations. Clinical manifestations range from asymptomatic cases to patients with mild and severe symptoms, with or without pneumonia. Laboratory detection of the viral nucleic acid can yield false-negative results, and serological testing of virus-specific IgG and IgM antibodies should be used as an alternative for diagnosis. Patients with common allergic diseases did not develop distinct symptoms and severe courses. Cases with a pre-existing condition of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or complicated with a secondary bacterial pneumonia were more severe. CONCLUSION: All different clinical characteristics of COVID-19 should be taken into consideration to identify patients that need to be in strict quarantine for the efficient containment of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Asymptomatic Diseases , COVID-19 , Child, Preschool , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
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