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Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 19(2): 2222648, 2023 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20245273

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 vaccination is effective for cancer patients without safety concerns. However, COVID-19 vaccination hesitancy is common among cancer patients. This study investigated factors affecting primary COVID-19 vaccination series completion rate among cancer patients in China. A multicentre cross-sectional study was conducted in four Chinese cities in different geographic regions between May and June 2022. A total of 893 cancer inpatients provided written informed consent and completed the study. Logistic regression models were fitted. Among the participants, 58.8% completed the primary COVID-19 vaccination series. After adjusting for background characteristics, concerns about interactions between COVID-19 vaccination and cancers/cancer treatment (adjusted odds ratios [AOR]: 0.97, 95%CI: 0.94, 0.99) were associated with lower completion of primary vaccination series. In addition, perceived higher risk of COVID-19 infection comparing to people without cancers (AOR: 0.46, 95%CI: 0.24, 0.88), perceived a high chance of having severe consequences of COVID-19 infection (AOR: 0.68, 95%CI: 0.51, 0.91) were also associated with lower completion rate. Being suggested by significant others (AOR: 1.32, 95%CI: 1.23, 1.41) and perceived higher self-efficacy to receive COVID-19 vaccination (AOR: 1.48, 95%CI: 1.31, 1.67) were positively associated with the dependent variable. Completion rate of primary COVID-19 vaccination series was low among Chinese cancer patients. Given the large population size and their vulnerability, this group urgently needs to increase COVID-19 vaccination coverage. Removing concerns about interactions between COVID-19 vaccination and cancers, using fear appeal approach, involving significant others, and facilitating patients to make a plan to receive COVID-19 vaccination might be useful strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/therapy , Asian People , Vaccination
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