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1.
Psychiatry Research ; 316:114796, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1983848

ABSTRACT

Background Suicide is among the leading causes of death for college students. We aimed to assess the impact of the pandemic on trends in suicidal thoughts and behaviors among college students, and whether suicidal thoughts and behaviors were associated with COVID-19 infection and psychosocial factors. Methods We analyzed 2017–2021 data from 4 waves of Healthy Minds Study including a random sample of college students (N = 354,473) from 286 U.S. institutions. We performed interrupted time series analysis to model the effect of the pandemic on trends in suicidal ideation (SI), plan (SP), and attempt (SA). At the peripandemic assessment, we utilized multivariable logistic regression to examine the association of SI, SP, and SA with COVID-19 infection and psychosocial factors. Results We observed significant decreases in SI, SP, and SA among college students from 2017 to 2021. The pandemic was significantly associated with a 1.33 percentage points reduction in SI and a 0.85 percentage points reduction in SP but was not associated with a significant reduction in SA. Adjusted associations of SI, SP, and SA with risk factors showed the significant odds ratio (OR) for suspected COVID-19 infection (SI: 1.33, SP: 1.22, SA: 1.32), severe depression (SI: 6.39, SP: 6.63, SA: 5.63), severe anxiety (SI: 3.66, SP: 3.62, SA: 3.60), COVID-19-related financial stress (SI: 1.35, SP: 1.34, SA: 1.48), food insecurity (SI: 2.12, SP: 2.13, SA: 2.79), and academic impairment (SI: 2.07, SP: 2.05, SA: 2.14) but not for test-confirmed COVID-19. Conclusion Certain COVID-19 mitigation strategies might have protected college students from suicidal thoughts/behaviors.

2.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-335490

ABSTRACT

In this study, we aimed to explore whether Lymphocyte-C-reactive protein ratio (LCR) can differentiate disease severity of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients and its value as an assistant screening tool for admission to the hospital and the intensive care unit (ICU). A total of 184 adult COVID-19 patients from the COVID-19 Treatment Center in Heilongjiang Province at the First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University between January 2020 and March 2021 were included in this study. Patients were divided into asymptomatic infection group, mild group, moderate group, severe group, and critical group according to the Diagnosis and Treatment of New Coronavirus Pneumonia (9th edition). Demographic and clinical data including gender, age, comorbidities, severity of COVID-19, white blood cell count (WBC), neutrophil proportion (NEUT%), lymphocyte count (LYMPH), lymphocyte percentage (LYM%), red blood cell distribution width (RDW), platelet (PLT), C-reaction protein (CRP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), serum creatinine (SCr), albumin (ALB), total bilirubin (TB), direct bilirubin (DBIL), indirect bilirubin (IBIL), and D-Dimer were obtained and collated from medical records at admission, from which sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score and LCR were calculated, and all above indicators were compared among groups. Multiple clinical parameters, including LYMPH, CRP and LCR, showed significant differences among groups. The related factors to classify COVID-19 patients into moderate, severe and critical groups included age, number of comorbidities, WBC, LCR, and AST. Among these factors, number of comorbidities showed the greatest effect, and only WBC and LCR were protective factors. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of LCR to classify COVID-19 patients into moderate, severe and critical groups was 0.176. The cut-off value of LCR, and the sensitivity and specificity of ROC curve were 1780.7050, 84.6% and 66.2%, respectively. The related factors to classify COVID-19 patients into severe and critical groups included number of comorbidities, PLT, LCR, and SOFA score. Among these factors, SOFA score showed the greatest effect, and LCR was the only protective factor. The area under ROC curve of LCR to classify COVID-19 patients into severe and critical groups was 0.106. The cut-off value of LCR and the sensitivity and specificity of ROC curve were 571.2200, 81.3% and 90.0%, respectively. In summary, LCR can differentiate disease severity of COVID-19 patients and serve as a simple and objective assistant screening tool for hospital and ICU admission.

3.
Humanities & Social Sciences Communications ; 9(1), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1805751

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought social injustice and inequalities to the forefront of global public health. Members of marginalised communities, such as racial/ethnic and sexual minorities, and persons with disabilities, have been shown to be more vulnerable to certain consequences of the pandemic. Research suggests a protective role of social support in health and wellness promotion, yet little is known about the disparities in specific social support sources (i.e., family, friends, and a significant other) between marginalised populations and their counterparts. Also unclear is the role of intersections of these marginalised identities in social support structures affected by the pandemic. Hence, it is crucial to capture and characterise such differences and intersectionality in order to address social inequalities in a time of global crisis. To that end, we surveyed U.S. adults across 45 states to examine their social support from family, friends, and a significant other. Results revealed the disproportionate impacts of the pandemic on social support among racial/ethnic and sexual minorities and persons with disabilities. Additionally, we found that White individuals with a marginalised identity received less social support than their White counterparts but received a similar level of social support when compared with racial/ethnic minorities without additional marginalised identities. This article seeks to elucidate the social support disparities associated with disproportionately increased social isolation for marginalised populations due to socioeconomic disadvantages. Specific recommendations are provided for addressing issues around social disparities and inequalities. With the experience and awareness attained working with marginalised populations, mental health professionals, public health officials, and community stakeholders should be poised to attend to social capital inequalities for diversity, equity, and inclusion now and in the post-pandemic era.

4.
Brain Behav Immun ; 87: 80-81, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1719341

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has posed an extreme threat to global health and become a leading cause of death worldwide. Loss, as a more encompassing theme, interweaves many aspects of people's life in this challenging time. Failure to address the pressing needs of those experiencing loss and grief may result in poor mental and physical health. Recognizing the uniqueness of each individual and their loss and grief will provide opportunities to develop tailored strategies that facilitate functional adaptation to loss and promote mental health and wellbeing in this crisis.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Bereavement , Coronavirus Infections , Grief , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Resilience, Psychological , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Disenfranchised Grief , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Front Pharmacol ; 13: 817793, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1705160

ABSTRACT

In this study, we aimed to determine whether continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) with oXiris filter may alleviate cytokine release syndrome (CRS) in non-AKI patients with severe and critical coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). A total of 17 non-AKI patients with severe and critical COVID-19 treated between February 14 and March 26, 2020 were included and randomly divided into intervention group and control group according to the random number table. Patients in the intervention group immediately received CRRT with oXiris filter plus conventional treatment, while those in the control group only received conventional treatment. Demographic data were collected and collated at admission. During ICU hospitalization, the concentrations of circulating cytokines and inflammatory chemokines, including IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α, and IFN-γ, were quantitatively measured daily to reflect the degree of CRS induced by SARS-CoV-2 infection. Clinical data, including the severity of COVID-19 white blood cell count (WBC), neutrophil proportion (NEUT%), lymphocyte count (LYMPH), lymphocyte percentage (LYM%), platelet (PLT), C-reaction protein (CRP), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total bilirubin (TB), albumin (ALB), serum creatinine (SCr), D-Dimer, fibrinogen (FIB), IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α, IFN-γ, number of hospital days and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score were obtained and collated from medical records, and then compared between the two groups. Age, and SCr significantly differed between the two groups. Besides the IL-2 concentration that was significantly lower on day 2 than that on day 1 in the intervention group, and the IL-6 concentrations that were significantly higher on day 1, and day 2 in the intervention group compared to the control group, similar to the IL-10 concentration on day 5, there were no significant differences between the two groups. To sum up, CRRT with oXiris filter may not effectively alleviate CRS in non-AKI patients with severe and critical COVID-19. Thus, its application in these patients should be considered with caution to avoid increasing the unnecessary burden on society and individuals and making the already overwhelmed medical system even more strained (IRB number: IRB-AF/SC-04).

6.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-292598

ABSTRACT

Background: In this study, we aimed to determine whether continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) with oXiris filter may alleviate cytokine release syndrome (CRS) in non-AKI patients with severe and critical coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).Methods: Non-AKI patients with severe and critical COVID-19 treated between February 14 and March 26, 2020 were included and randomly divided into intervention group and control group according to the random number table. Patients in the intervention group received CRRT with oXiris filter plus conventional treatment, while those in the control group only received conventional treatment. Demographic data were collected and collated at admission. During ICU hospitalization, the serum levels of cytokine and inflammatory chemokines, including IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α, and IFN-γ, were measured daily to reflect the degree of CRS induced by SARS-CoV-2 infection. Clinical data, including white blood cell count (WBC), neutrophil proportion (NEUT%), lymphocyte count (LYMPH), lymphocyte percentage (LYM%), platelet (PLT), C-reaction protein (CRP), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total bilirubin (TB), albumin (ALB), serum creatinine (SCr), D-Dimer, fibrinogen (FIB), IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α, IFN-γ, number of hospital days and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score were obtained and collated from medical records during hospitalization, and then compared between the two groups.Results: Age, and SCr significantly differed between the two groups. Besides the IL-2 level that was significantly lower on day 2 than that on day 1 in the intervention group, and the IL-6 levels that were significantly higher on day 1, and day 2 in the intervention group compared to the control group, similar to the IL-10 level on day 5, there were no significant differences between the groups.Conclusion: CRRT with oXiris filter may not effectively alleviate CRS in non-AKI patients with severe and critical COVID-19. Thus, its application in these patients should be considered with caution to avoid increasing the unnecessary burden on society and individuals and making the already overwhelmed medical system even more strained (IRB number: IRB-AF/SC-04).

7.
World J Clin Cases ; 9(21): 5955-5962, 2021 Jul 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1335439

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As a highly contagious disease, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is wreaking havoc around the world due to continuous spread among close contacts mainly via droplets, aerosols, contaminated hands or surfaces. Therefore, centralized isolation of close contacts and suspected patients is an important measure to prevent the transmission of COVID-19. At present, the quarantine duration in most countries is 14 d due to the fact that the incubation period of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is usually identified as 1-14 d with median estimate of 4-7.5 d. Since COVID-19 patients in the incubation period are also contagious, cases with an incubation period of more than 14 d need to be evaluated. CASE SUMMARY: A 70-year-old male patient was admitted to the Department of Respiratory Medicine of The First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University on April 5 due to a cough with sputum and shortness of breath. On April 10, the patient was transferred to the Fever Clinic for further treatment due to close contact to one confirmed COVID-19 patient in the same room. During the period from April 10 to May 6, nucleic acid and antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 were tested 7 and 4 times, respectively, all of which were negative. On May 7, the patient developed fever with a maximum temperature of 39℃, and his respiratory difficulties had deteriorated. The results of nucleic acid and antibody detection of SARS-CoV-2 were positive. On May 8, the nucleic acid and antibody detection of SARS-CoV-2 by Heilongjiang Provincial Center for Disease Control were also positive, and the patient was diagnosed with COVID-19 and reported to the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention. CONCLUSION: This case highlights the importance of the SARS-CoV-2 incubation period. Further epidemiological investigations and clinical observations are urgently needed to identify the optimal incubation period of SARS-CoV-2 and formulate rational and evidence-based quarantine policies for COVID-19 accordingly.

8.
Chin Med Sci J ; 36(2): 85-96, 2021 Jun 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1299806

ABSTRACT

ObjectiveTo describe the epidemiologic, clinical, laboratory, and radiological characteristics and prognoses of COVID-19 confirmed patients in a single center in Beijing, China. Methods The study retrospectively included 19 patients with nucleic acid-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection at our hospital from January 20 to March 5, 2020. The final follow-up date was March 14, 2020. The epidemiologic and clinical information was obtained through direct communication with the patients or their family members. Laboratory results retrieved from medical records and radiological images were analyzed both qualitatively by two senior chest radiologists as well as quantitatively via an artificial intelligence software. Results We identified 5 family clusters (13/19, 68.4%) from the study cohort. All cases had good clinical prognoses and were either mild (3/19) or moderate (16/19) clinical types. Fever (15/19, 78.9%) and dry cough (11/19, 57.9%) were common symptoms. Two patients received negative results for more than three consecutive viral nucleic acid tests. The longest interval between an initial CT abnormal finding and a confirmed diagnosis was 30 days. One patient's nucleic acid test turned positive on the follow-up examination after discharge. The presence of radiological abnormalities was non-specific for the diagnosis of COVID-19. Conclusions COVID-19 patients with mild or no clinical symptoms are common in Beijing, China. Radiological abnormalities are mostly non-specific and massive CT examinations for COVID-19 screening should be avoided. Analyses of the contact histories of diagnosed cases in combination with clinical, radiological and laboratory findings are crucial for the early detection of COVID-19. Close monitoring after discharge is also recommended.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , COVID-19 , Lung/diagnostic imaging , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Child , China , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies
11.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(26): e20965, 2020 Jun 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-616562

ABSTRACT

Quantitative studies using validated questionnaires on post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) of Nurses exposed to corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in China are rare and the baseline PTSD must first be evaluated before prevention. This study aimed to investigate the factors potentially involved in the level of PTSD of Nurses exposed to COVID-19 in China.In this cross-sectional study, male and female Nurses (n = 202) exposed to COVID-19 from HuBei China were included in the final sample. The PTSD Checklist-Civilian (PCL-C) questionnaire and Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire (SCSQ) were used for evaluation. Multivariate stepwise linear regression analysis and spearman correlation test were performed to assess the association between various factors associated with PTSD.The incidence of PTSD in Nurses exposed to COVID-19 was 16.83%, the PCL-C score was 27.00 (21.00-34.00), and the highest score in the three dimensions was avoidance dimension 9.50 (7.00-13.25); multivariable stepwise linear regression analysis showed that job satisfaction and gender were independently associated with lower PCL-C scores (both P < .001); PCL-C scores were correlated with positive coping (r = -0.151, P = .032), negative coping (r = 0.154, P = .029).Nurses exposed to COVID-19 from HuBei China with job satisfaction, male and positive coping had low PCL-C scores which necessitate reducing the PTSD level by ways of improving job satisfaction, positive response, and strengthening the psychological counseling of female nurses in order to reduce the risk of psychological impairment.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/nursing , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Adult , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Pandemics , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology
12.
Psychiatry Res ; 288: 113003, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-101913

ABSTRACT

College students encounter unique challenges leading to poor mental health in the wake of the COVID-19 outbreak. Before the pandemic started, one in five college students experienced one or more diagnosable mental disorders worldwide. The fact that the COVID-19 pandemic affects collegiate mental health underscores the urgent need to understand these challenges and concerns in order to inform the development of courses of action and public health messaging that can better support college students in this crisis. This article provides recommendations that prepare higher education institutions and health professionals for addressing collegiate mental health needs and challenges posed by COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Health Communication , Mental Health , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Students/psychology , Adolescent , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2 , Universities , Young Adult
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