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1.
Journal of the Indian Medical Association ; 119(6):87-90, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1357839

ABSTRACT

Healthy life and longevity is the ultimate desire of one and all. There is a difference between disease free life and healthy life. Both of these elements are essential for healthy living. This is high time when about 10 lakhs Doctors of Allopathy (Modern Medicine) and similar Doctors of AYUSH (Ayurveda, Yoga and Naturopathy, Unani, Siddha and Homeopathy) should join hands together to fight against Corona Pandemic and other dreaded diseases like Diabetes, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Liver Disease, Cancer, TB etc. There is no competition or contradiction between Allopathy (Modern Medicine), Ayurveda or other pathies. All are for the good and wellbeing of mankind. There is no justification for cross allegations among them. So-called Propagates of Ayurveda recently criticized and blamed Allopathy (Modern Medicine) for their vested interest. It is against the medical ethics, Indian values and traditions. Such forces which want to create rift between the Allopathy (Modern Medicine) and Ayurveda are against the Society and Humanity. Such people are also weakening the spirit and vision of Prime Minister’s Healthy India while all systems of AYUSH (Ayurveda, Yoga and Naturopathy, Unani, Siddha and Homeopathy) are meant primarily for prevention and promotion of health and care of chronic life style related disease, Allopathy (Modern Medicine) is more useful for emergencies, trauma, infections and Intensive care services during the covid pandemic. The services rendered by all pathies were marvelous and fruitful for the management of COVID-19 in India. [J Indian Med Assoc 2021;119(6): 87-90].

2.
J Healthc Qual Res ; 37(1): 20-27, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1322206

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Frontline healthcare workers (F-HCWs) are at the forefront of medical care providers against the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic which has life-threatening potentials. Inadequate knowledge and incorrect attitudes among HCWs can directly influence practices and lead to delayed diagnosis, poor infection control practices, and spread of disease. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) regarding the COVID-19 pandemic among the frontline healthcare workers (F-HCWs) working at a tertiary care hospital situated in eastern Uttar Pradesh and to identify the factors significantly associated with KAP. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 260 health care providers across eastern Uttar Pradesh including Basti city during December 2020. Data was collected using a self-primed pretested questionnaire from the FHCWs working at a tertiary care hospital of eastern Uttar Pradesh. In this survey, a convenience sampling method was adopted. 12 items on knowledge, 10 items on attitude, and 5 items on practices related to COVID-19. The other variables consisted of 4 items on socio-demographic attributes, p-value and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were performed to assess the attitude and practices in relation to knowledge. RESULTS: Of the total 260 study population, 228 were interviewed online, 32 were self-administered. Knowledge and attitude of the nursing staff were highest but practice score was best for residents. Among different age groups knowledge, attitude and practices scores were highest for 35-45, 45-60 and 25-35 age groups respectively. Respondents having 5-10 years of experience had the best knowledge and the attitude score was highest for HCWs having 10-20 years' experience but the practice score was higher for HCWs having more than 20 years' work experience. Overall knowledge score of respondents having strong correlation with attitude (p<0.05) and to the practice (p<0.05). CONCLUSION: In this survey many F-HCWs reported adequate overall knowledge with a positive attitude and adopted appropriate practices. The F-HCWs with a higher level of education and more years of experience in health care facilities had better KAP towards COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Asian Journal of Anesthesiology ; : 1-4, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1315996
4.
Organizations and Markets in Emerging Economies ; 12(1):131-159, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1266986

ABSTRACT

This study examines the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on the performance of Indian stock market, measured by daily average returns and trading volume. The analysis is aimed at discovering the vulnerability of the general market as well as nine crucial sectors to the pandemic while also checking the impact on overall volatility in the market. The findings suggest that all the sectors followed a consistent pattern of being significantly impacted by the pandemic. However, the benchmark index remained resilient in the context of average returns. The entire market witnessed decreased returns and increased liquidity, which is explained by reduced volatility in the market. © 2021 Priti Dubey, Rishika Shankar.

5.
Climate Change and Environmental Sustainability ; 8(1):93-99, 2020.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1207912

ABSTRACT

In the search of ways to conserve biodiversity and ensure human well-being, there has already been a growing interest towards implementing Nature based solutions (NbS). Various global agencies works are dynamic in bringing international calls, decades, goals and action into perspective. However, having only ten more years in hand to achieve the 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (UN-SDGs), entire humanity is bound to face trying period under COVID-19 Pandemic, as the year 2020 commences. Nonetheless, confidence in NbS sustains and is now gaining profound attention by local communities worldwide. Therefore, it is the high time for utilizing NbS for biodiversity conservation and attaining global goals for wellbeing of both people and planet.

6.
Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine ; 25(SUPPL 1):S46, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1200254

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Many times critically ill patients who are either suspected cases of COVID-19 or COVID-19 positive coming to intensive care units require central venous access. Wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) for placing a central venous catheter can make the procedure challenging because of poor visibility. Insertion of the central venous catheter becomes even more difficult when the patient is in respiratory distress and is unable to lie flat on the bed. In COVID-19 positive or suspected patients where it is difficult to cannulate internal jugular vein (IJV) or subclavian vein due to anatomical or medical reasons, we suggest ultrasound-guided “low approach” femoral central venous access as an alternative.2 We report a case of acute pulmonary edema secondary to rheumatic heart disease which was managed successfully with ultrasoundguided low approach femoral central venous access. Materials and methods: A 37-year-old woman with a history of rheumatic heart disease presented in intensive care with acute pulmonary edema. The nasopharyngeal swab was taken for reverse-transcriptionpolymerase- chain-reaction (RT-PCR) assay to rule out COVID-19. The patient was managed in a line of acute pulmonary edema with an upright position, oxygen support, noninvasive ventilation (NIV), furosemide, and morphine. This patient required urgent central venous access for starting vasopressor and further management. As the patient was unable to lie flat on the bed and multiple attempts for vascular access were already tried in the emergency department, we planned for low approach femoral access. We used ultrasound with a linear probe to scan the femoral vessel at the level of the groin. By keeping the femoral vein in the center of the screen, a needle was inserted from the middle of the linear probe at an angle of 30 to 45°. The position of the guidewire inside the femoral vein was confirmed with ultrasound by using a long axis view before threading the catheter over it. The cannulation was successful in the first attempt. Discussions: In this case, we successfully inserted an ultrasound-guided femoral central line 5 cm below the inguinal ligament in a view to further reduce catheter induced infection rate. It has been suggested that the risk of infection will be very much reduced if we use full barrier precaution, ultrasound guidance, low approach, tunneling, and medicated catheter. Another advantage of low approach femoral access is that a person doing this procedure is away from the respiratory passage of the patient it may reduce chances of airborne infection during the COVID-19 pandemic. Placing the catheter in the femoral vessel will not interfere with the respiratory care (helmet-based NIV). Proning patients during mechanical ventilation and dressing of the line is also not a problem with low approach femoral venous access. Femoral access should be avoided in patients with peripheral venous and arterial disease and renal transplant. Conclusion: In this case, we have highlighted that modification of femoral venous access helps to achieve the central access quite fast and also increases the safety of both patient and operator. We suggest that in present times of COVID-19 pandemic, ultrasound-guided low approach femoral central venous access may be used in emergencies and also where other options of central venous cannulation are not suitable.

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