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1.
Vaccine ; 40(23): 3174-3181, 2022 May 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1796036

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Short-term side effects related to mRNA vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 are frequent and bothersome, with the potential to disrupt work duties and impact future vaccine decision-making. OBJECTIVE: To identify factors more likely to lead to vaccine-associated work disruption, employee absenteeism, and future vaccine reluctance among healthcare workers (HCWs). HYPOTHESIS: Side effects related to COVID vaccination: 1- frequently disrupt HCW duties, 2- result in a significant proportion of HCW absenteeism, 3- contribute to uncertainty about future booster vaccination, 4- vary based on certain demographic, socioeconomic, occupational, and vaccine-related factors. METHODS: Using an anonymous, voluntary electronic survey, we obtained responses from a large, heterogeneous sample of COVID-19-vaccinated HCWs in two healthcare systems in Southern California. Descriptive statistics and regression models were utilized to evaluate the research questions. RESULTS: Among 2,103 vaccinated HCWs, 579 (27.5%) reported that vaccine-related symptoms disrupted their professional responsibilities, and 380 (18.1%) missed work as a result. Independent predictors for absenteeism included experiencing generalized and work-disruptive symptoms, and receiving the Moderna vaccine [OR = 1.77 (95% CI = 1.33 - 2.36), p < 0.001]. Physicians were less likely to miss work due to side effects (6.7% vs 21.2% for all other HCWs, p < 0.001). Independent predictors of reluctance toward future booster vaccination included lower education level, younger age, having received the Moderna vaccine, and missing work due to vaccine-related symptoms. CONCLUSION: Symptoms related to mRNA vaccinations against SARS-CoV-2 may frequently disrupt work duties, lead to absenteeism, and impact future vaccine decision-making. This may be more common in Moderna recipients and less likely among physicians. Accordingly, health employers should schedule future booster vaccination cycles to minimize loss of work productivity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions , Absenteeism , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Health Personnel , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/adverse effects
2.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264921, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753191

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To identify preferred burnout interventions within a resident physician population, utilizing the Nominal Group Technique. The results will be used to design a discrete choice experiment study to inform the development of resident burnout prevention programs. METHODS: Three resident focus groups met (10-14 participants/group) to prioritize a list of 23 factors for burnout prevention programs. The Nominal Group Technique consisted of three steps: an individual, confidential ranking of the 23 factors by importance from 1 to 23, a group discussion of each attribute, including a group review of the rankings, and an opportunity to alter the original ranking across participants. RESULTS: The total number of residents (36) were a representative sample of specialty, year of residency, and sex. There was strong agreement about the most highly rated attributes which grouped naturally into themes of autonomy, meaning, competency and relatedness. There was also disagreement on several of the attributes that is likely due to the differences in residency specialty and subsequently rotation requirements. CONCLUSION: This study identified the need to address multiple organizational factors that may lead to physician burnout. There is a clear need for complex interventions that target systemic and program level factors rather than focus on individual interventions. These results may help residency program directors understand the specific attributes of a burnout prevention program valued by residents. Aligning burnout interventions with resident preferences could improve the efficacy of burnout prevention programs by improving adoption of, and satisfaction with, these programs. Physician burnout is a work-related syndrome characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and a sense of reduced personal accomplishment [1]. Burnout is present in epidemic proportions and was estimated to occur in over 50 percent of practicing physicians and in up to 89 percent of resident physicians pre-COVID 19. The burnout epidemic is growing; a recent national survey of US physicians reported an 8.9 percent increase in burnout between 2011 and 2014 [2]. Rates of physician burnout have also increased [3] during the COVID-19 pandemic with a new classification of "pandemic burnout" experienced by over 52 percent of healthcare workers as early as June of 2020 [4]. Physician burnout can lead to depression, suicidal ideation, and relationship problems that may progress to substance abuse, increased interpersonal conflicts, broken relationships, low quality of life, major depression, and suicide [5-7]. The estimated rate of physician suicide is 300-400 annually [8-10].


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Physicians/psychology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Exercise/psychology , Female , Focus Groups , Humans , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Male , Mindfulness , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Risk Factors , Sleep Hygiene , Social Support
3.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 9(12)2021 Dec 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1614016

ABSTRACT

In this study, we evaluated the status of and attitudes toward COVID-19 vaccination of healthcare workers in two major hospital systems (academic and private) in Southern California. Responses were collected via an anonymous and voluntary survey from a total of 2491 participants, including nurses, physicians, other allied health professionals, and administrators. Among the 2491 participants that had been offered the vaccine at the time of the study, 2103 (84%) were vaccinated. The bulk of the participants were middle-aged college-educated White (73%), non-Hispanic women (77%), and nursing was the most represented medical occupation (35%). Political affiliation, education level, and income were shown to be significant factors associated with vaccination status. Our data suggest that the current allocation of healthcare workers into dichotomous groups such as "anti-vaccine vs. pro-vaccine" may be inadequate in accurately tailoring vaccine uptake interventions. We found that healthcare workers that have yet to receive the COVID-19 vaccine likely belong to one of four categories: the misinformed, the undecided, the uninformed, or the unconcerned. This diversity in vaccine hesitancy among healthcare workers highlights the importance of targeted intervention to increase vaccine confidence. Regardless of governmental vaccine mandates, addressing the root causes contributing to vaccine hesitancy continues to be of utmost importance.

4.
Open Forum Infectious Diseases ; 8(Supplement_1):S291-S291, 2021.
Article in English | PMC | ID: covidwho-1569871
5.
Open forum infectious diseases ; 8(Suppl 1):S291-S291, 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1564956

ABSTRACT

Background Rapid testing to identify asymptomatically infected students with SARS-CoV-2 in elementary schools has been suggested as a possible method to reduce risk for in person instruction. As of August 3, 2020 (updated on January 25, 2021), California schools who obtained a waiver to conduct in-person instruction are not required to have mandatory testing for asymptomatic students, except for high contact sports which are required to undergo weekly testing. We explored the uptake of voluntary vs mandatory testing in a private waivered school. Methods Between the dates January 25, 2021 to April 16, 2021, the K-12 school superintendent sent an email to all parents outlining the voluntary testing program with a link to the on-line sign up and consent form. All students were offered weekly self-collected anterior nares BinaxNOW Rapid Antigen Test. Signed parental consent was required and tests were performed at the school. Students participating in contact sports were required to undergo testing the week a varsity game was played as a condition of participation. Data was gathered from the school administration and de-identified. Results K-5 Lower school had a school population of 448 students. Testing was offered on 8 weeks during the period of 2/15-2/19 to 4/5-4/9. 2 students (0.45%) receive screening on the week of 3/22-3/26. The other seven weeks when screening was offered 0 students received screening. 6-12 Upper school had a school population of 360 enrolled students. Testing was offered 3/8-3/12 and 3/15-3/19. The upper school had 22 students (6.11%) receive testing on the week of 3/8-3/12 and 21 students (5.83%) on the week of 3/15-3/19. Contact sports teams had 67 students on their roster. Weekly testing was offered from 3/22-3/26 to 4/12-4/16. Contact sports teams had 10 students (14.93%) receive testing on the week of 3/22-3/26, 33 students (52.24%) on the week of 4/5-4/9, and 32 students (49.25%) on the week of 4/12-4/16. Figure 1. Percent of students from each campus and sports team screened per week offered. Conclusion Voluntary SARS-CoV-2 screening was not a feasible approach for detection of asymptomatically infected individuals due to low uptake, however in the same school, mandatory testing had high uptake and would be a feasible strategy. Disclosures All Authors: No reported disclosures

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