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1.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 73(11): 1976-1985, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1432359

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The clinical relevance of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) in COVID-19 is controversial. This study was undertaken to investigate the prevalence and prognostic value of conventional and nonconventional aPLs in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: This was a multicenter, prospective observational study in a French cohort of patients hospitalized with suspected COVID-19. RESULTS: Two hundred forty-nine patients were hospitalized with suspected COVID-19, in whom COVID-19 was confirmed in 154 and not confirmed in 95. We found a significant increase in lupus anticoagulant (LAC) positivity among patients with COVID-19 compared to patients without COVID-19 (60.9% versus 23.7%; P < 0.001), while prevalence of conventional aPLs (IgG and IgM anti-ß2 -glycoprotein I and IgG and IgM anticardiolipin isotypes) and nonconventional aPLs (IgA isotype of anticardiolipin, IgA isotype of anti-ß2 -glycoprotein I, IgG and IgM isotypes of anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin, and IgG and IgM isotypes of antiprothrombin) was low in both groups. Patients with COVID-19 who were positive for LAC, as compared to patients with COVID-19 who were negative for LAC, had higher levels of fibrinogen (median 6.0 gm/liter [interquartile range 5.0-7.0] versus 5.3 gm/liter [interquartile range 4.3-6.4]; P = 0.028) and C-reactive protein (CRP) (median 115.5 mg/liter [interquartile range 66.0-204.8] versus 91.8 mg/liter [interquartile range 27.0-155.1]; P = 0.019). Univariate analysis did not show any association between LAC positivity and higher risks of venous thromboembolism (VTE) (odds ratio 1.02 [95% confidence interval 0.44-2.43], P = 0.95) or in-hospital mortality (odds ratio 1.80 [95% confidence interval 0.70-5.05], P = 0.24). With and without adjustment for CRP level, age, and sex, Kaplan-Meier survival curves according to LAC positivity confirmed the absence of an association with VTE or in-hospital mortality (unadjusted P = 0.64 and P = 0.26, respectively; adjusted hazard ratio 1.13 [95% confidence interval 0.48-2.60] and 1.80 [95% confidence interval 0.67-5.01], respectively). CONCLUSION: Patients with COVID-19 have an increased prevalence of LAC positivity associated with biologic markers of inflammation. However, LAC positivity at the time of hospital admission is not associated with VTE risk and/or in-hospital mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Lupus Coagulation Inhibitor/blood , Venous Thromboembolism/etiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , Survival Rate , Venous Thromboembolism/blood
2.
J Clin Virol ; 139: 104847, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1201793

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The vast majority of COVID-19 patients experience a mild disease. However, a minority suffers from critical disease with substantial morbidity and mortality. OBJECTIVES: To identify individuals at risk of critical COVID-19, the relevance of a seroreactivity against seasonal human coronaviruses was analyzed. METHODS: We conducted a multi-center non-interventional study comprising 296 patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infections from four tertiary care referral centers in Germany and France. The ICU group comprised more males, whereas the outpatient group contained a higher percentage of females. For each patient, the serum or plasma sample obtained closest after symptom onset was examined by immunoblot regarding IgG antibodies against the nucleocapsid protein (NP) of HCoV 229E, NL63, OC43 and HKU1. RESULTS: Median age was 60 years (range 18-96). Patients with critical disease (n=106) had significantly lower levels of anti-HCoV OC43 nucleocapsid protein (NP)-specific antibodies compared to other COVID-19 inpatients (p=0.007). In multivariate analysis (adjusted for age, sex and BMI), OC43 negative inpatients had an increased risk of critical disease (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 2.68 [95% CI 1.09 - 7.05]), higher than the risk by increased age or BMI, and lower than the risk by male sex. A risk stratification based on sex and OC43 serostatus was derived from this analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that prior infections with seasonal human coronaviruses can protect against a severe course of COVID-19. Therefore, anti-OC43 antibodies should be measured for COVID-19 inpatients and considered as part of the risk assessment for each patient. Hence, we expect individuals tested negative for anti-OC43 antibodies to particularly benefit from vaccination against SARS-CoV-2, especially with other risk factors prevailing.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/etiology , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Phosphoproteins/immunology , Risk Factors , Young Adult
3.
J Thromb Haemost ; 19(7): 1823-1830, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1172713

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a respiratory disease associated with vascular inflammation and endothelial injury. OBJECTIVES: To correlate circulating angiogenic markers vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), placental growth factor (PlGF), and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) to in-hospital mortality in COVID-19 adult patients. METHODS: Consecutive ambulatory and hospitalized patients with COVID-19 infection were enrolled. VEGF-A, PlGF, and FGF-2 were measured in each patient ≤48 h following admission. RESULTS: The study enrolled 237 patients with suspected COVID-19: 208 patients had a positive diagnostic for COVID-19, of whom 23 were mild outpatients and 185 patients hospitalized after admission. Levels of VEGF-A, PlGF, and FGF-2 significantly increase with the severity of the disease (P < .001). Using a logistic regression model, we found a significant association between the increase of FGF-2 or PlGF and mortality (odds ratio [OR] 1.11, 95% confidence interval [CI; 1.07-1.16], P < .001 for FGF-2 and OR 1.07 95% CI [1.04-1.10], P < .001 for PlGF) while no association were found for VEGF-A levels. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed and we identified PlGF above 30 pg/ml as the best predictor of in-hospital mortality in COVID-19 patients. Survival analysis for PlGF confirmed its interest for in-hospital mortality prediction, by using a Kaplan-Meier survival curve (P = .001) and a Cox proportional hazard model adjusted to age, body mass index, D-dimer, and C-reactive protein (3.23 95% CI [1.29-8.11], P = .001). CONCLUSION: Angiogenic factor PlGF is a relevant predictive factor for in-hospital mortality in COVID-19 patients. More than a biomarker, we hypothesize that PlGF blocking strategies could be a new interesting therapeutic approach in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A , Adult , Biomarkers , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Placenta Growth Factor , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Cell Death Dis ; 12(3): 258, 2021 03 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1132059

ABSTRACT

The circulating metabolome provides a snapshot of the physiological state of the organism responding to pathogenic challenges. Here we report alterations in the plasma metabolome reflecting the clinical presentation of COVID-19 patients with mild (ambulatory) diseases, moderate disease (radiologically confirmed pneumonitis, hospitalization and oxygen therapy), and critical disease (in intensive care). This analysis revealed major disease- and stage-associated shifts in the metabolome, meaning that at least 77 metabolites including amino acids, lipids, polyamines and sugars, as well as their derivatives, were altered in critical COVID-19 patient's plasma as compared to mild COVID-19 patients. Among a uniformly moderate cohort of patients who received tocilizumab, only 10 metabolites were different among individuals with a favorable evolution as compared to those who required transfer into the intensive care unit. The elevation of one single metabolite, anthranilic acid, had a poor prognostic value, correlating with the maintenance of high interleukin-10 and -18 levels. Given that products of the kynurenine pathway including anthranilic acid have immunosuppressive properties, we speculate on the therapeutic utility to inhibit the rate-limiting enzymes of this pathway including indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Metabolome , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/administration & dosage , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Metabolomics , Prognosis
5.
Angiogenesis ; 24(3): 505-517, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1032491

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a respiratory disease associated with endotheliitis and microthrombosis. OBJECTIVES: To correlate endothelial dysfunction to in-hospital mortality in a bi-centric cohort of COVID-19 adult patients. METHODS: Consecutive ambulatory and hospitalized patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 were enrolled. A panel of endothelial biomarkers and von Willebrand factor (VWF) multimers were measured in each patient ≤ 48 h following admission. RESULTS: Study enrolled 208 COVID-19 patients of whom 23 were mild outpatients and 189 patients hospitalized after admission. Most of endothelial biomarkers tested were found increased in the 89 critical patients transferred to intensive care unit. However, only von Willebrand factor antigen (VWF:Ag) scaled according to clinical severity, with levels significantly higher in critical patients (median 507%, IQR 428-596) compared to non-critical patients (288%, 230-350, p < 0.0001) or COVID-19 outpatients (144%, 133-198, p = 0.007). Moreover, VWF high molecular weight multimers (HMWM) were significantly higher in critical patients (median ratio 1.18, IQR 0.86-1.09) compared to non-critical patients (0.96, 1.04-1.39, p < 0.001). Among all endothelial biomarkers measured, ROC curve analysis identified a VWF:Ag cut-off of 423% as the best predictor for in-hospital mortality. The accuracy of VWF:Ag was further confirmed in a Kaplan-Meier estimator analysis and a Cox proportional Hazard model adjusted on age, BMI, C-reactive protein and D-dimer levels. CONCLUSION: VWF:Ag is a relevant predictive factor for in-hospital mortality in COVID-19 patients. More than a biomarker, we hypothesize that VWF, including excess of HMWM forms, drives microthrombosis in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , von Willebrand Factor/metabolism , Adult , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , Biomarkers/chemistry , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Endothelium, Vascular/physiopathology , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Male , Middle Aged , Molecular Weight , Paris/epidemiology , Proportional Hazards Models , Protein Multimerization , Severity of Illness Index , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/etiology , von Willebrand Factor/chemistry
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