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1.
J Am Soc Nephrol ; 2021 Oct 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1566580

ABSTRACT

Background: Accumulating evidence suggests that solid organ transplant recipients, as opposed to the general population, show strongly impaired responsiveness towards standard SARS-CoV-2 mRNA-based vaccination, demanding alternative strategies for protection of this vulnerable group. Methods: In line with recent recommendations, a third dose of either heterologous ChAdOx1 (AstraZeneca) or homologous BNT162b2 (BioNTech) was administered to 25 kidney transplant recipients (KTR) without humoral response after 2 doses of BNT162b2, followed by analysis of serological responses and vaccine-specific B- and T-cell immunity. Results: 9/25 (36%) KTR under standard immunosuppressive treatment seroconverted until day 27 after the third vaccination, while one patient developed severe COVID-19 infection immediately after vaccination. Cellular analysis seven days after the third dose showed significantly elevated frequencies of viral spike protein receptor binding domain specific B cells in humoral responders as compared to non-responders. Likewise, portions of spike-reactive CD4+ T helper cells were significantly elevated in seroconverting patients. Furthermore, overall frequencies of IL-2+, IL-4+ and polyfunctional CD4+ T cells significantly increased after the third dose, whereas memory/effector differentiation remained unaffected. Conclusions: Our data suggest that a fraction of transplant recipients benefits from triple vaccination, where seroconversion is associated with quantitative and qualitative changes of cellular immunity. At the same time, the study highlights that modified vaccination approaches for immunosuppressed patients still remain an urgent medical need.

2.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-296076

ABSTRACT

Background: Several observations indicate a hyperinflammatory state in severely ill COVID-19 patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of extracorporeal cytokine elimination by CytoSorb® on COVID-19 associated vasoplegic shock.<br><br>Methods: In this prospective randomised pilot study COVID-19 patients with vasoplegic shock requiring norepinephrine >0·2 µg/kg/min, CRP >100 mg/L and indication for hemodialysis were randomised 1:1 to receive CytoSorb® treatment for 3-7 days or standard of care. The primary endpoint was time until resolution of vasoplegic shock, estimated by a Cox-regression model. Secondary endpoints included mortality, serum interleukin-6 concentrations, and catecholamine requirements. The study was registered in the German Registry of Clinical Trials (DRKS00021447).<br><br>Findings: From November 2020 to March 2021, 50 patients were enrolled of which 23 patients were randomised to receive CytoSorb® treatment and 26 patients to receive standard of care. One patient randomised to cytokine adsorption was excluded due to withdrawal of informed consent. Resolution of vasoplegic shock was observed in 13 (56·5%) of 23 patients in the CytoSorb® and 12 (46·2%) of 26 patients in the control group after a median of 5 (IQR 4-5) and 4 (IQR 3-5) days, respectively. The hazard ratio (HR) for the primary endpoint, adjusted for the predefined variables age, gender, ECMO-therapy, or time from shock onset to study inclusion was HR 1·23 (95%CI: 0·54-2·79), p=0·63). The mortality rate was 78% in the CytoSorb® and 73% in the control group (unadjusted HR 1·17 (95%CI: 0·61-2.23), p=0·64). The effects on inflammatory markers and catecholamine requirements and the type and rates of adverse events were similar in the two groups.<br><br>Interpretation: In this pilot trial in severely ill COVID-19 patients CytoSorb® treatment did not improve resolution of vasoplegic shock as compared to standard treatment. Mortality rates, catecholamine requirements, inflammatory markers and adverse events did not differ between the two groups.<br><br>Trial Registration: The study was registered in the German Registry of Clinical Trials (DRKS00021447<br><br>Funding: Internal university funds<br><br>Declaration of Interest: HS, LJL, MP, TK, PT, FS, KUE, SK, JVK, MO, AKrü, A Kra, KB declare no conflicts of interest. PE received honoraria from GSK and AstraZeneca and filed two patents for novel urinary biomarkers outside the submitted work. ST received research funding and honoraria for workshops and lectures from Orionpharma. He additionally received honoraria for workshops and lectures from Edwards and honoraria for lectures from Amomed and Smith&Nephews. CS received grants from: Drägerwerk AG& Co.KGaA;German Reseach Society;German Aerospace Center;Einstein Foundation Berlin;Federal Joint Committee (G-BA);Inner University grants;Project Management Agency;Non-Profit Promoting Science and Education;European Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care;Baxter Deutschland GmbH;Cytosorbents Europe GmbH;Edwards Lifsciences Germany GmbH;Fresenius Medical Care;Grünenthal GmbH;Massimo Europe Ltd.;Pfizer Pharma PFE GmbH;Georg Thieme Verlag, Dr. F Köhler Chemie GmbH;Sintetica GmbH;Stifterverband für die deutsche Wissenschaft e.V./Philips;Stiftung Charié;AGUETTANT Deutschland GmbH;AbbVie Deutschland GmbH & Co.KG;Amomed Pharma GmbH;InTouch Health;Copra System GmbH;Correvio GmbH;Max Plank Gesellschaft zur Förderung der Wissenschaften e.V.;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Anästhesiologie & Intensivmedizin (DGAI);Stifterverband für die Deutsche Wissenschaft e.V./Medtronic;Philipps ElectronicsNederland BV;BMG, BMBF, German Research Society all outside the submitted work. In addition, CS has different patents. DK received fees for speaking at a symposia organized on behalf of Fresenius Medical Care AG, Germany.<br><br>Ethical Approval: The original protocol and the changes were approved by the local ethics<br>committee (EA1/069/20).

3.
Transbound Emerg Dis ; 2021 Nov 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546411

ABSTRACT

West Nile Virus (WNV) infections are increasingly detected in birds and horses in central Europe, with a first mosquito-borne autochthonous human infection detected in Germany in 2019. Human infections are typically asymptomatic, with occasional severe neurological disease. Because of a low number of cases in central Europe, awareness regarding potential cases is low and WNV diagnostic is neglected. We tested cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from unsolved encephalitis and meningitis cases from Berlin from 2019 and 2020, and describe a WNV-encephalitis case in a 33-year old kidney transplant recipient. The infectious course was resolved by serology, RT-PCR, and sequencing of stored samples. Phylogenetic sequence analysis revealed a close relationship of the patient's WNV strain to German sequences from 2019 and 2020. A lack of travel history and patient self-isolation during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic suggest the infection was acquired in the patient's home or garden. Serological tests of four people sharing the living space were negative. Retrospective RT-PCR and WNV-IgM testing of 671 CSF samples from unsolved encephalitis and meningitis cases from Berlin detected no additional infections. The recent increase of WNV cases illustrates the importance of considering WNV in cases of meningoencephalitis, especially in immunocompromised patients, as described here. Proper education and communication and a revised diagnostic strategy will help to raise awareness and to detect future WNV infections. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

4.
J Crit Care ; 67: 126-131, 2021 Nov 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1509976

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We compared filter survival and citrate-induced complications during continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) with regional citrate anticoagulation (RCA) in COVID-19 and Non-COVID-19 patients. METHODS: In this retrospective study we included all consecutive adult patients (n = 97) treated with RCA-CRRT. Efficacy and complications of RCA-CRRT were compared between COVID-19 and Non-COVID-19 patients. RESULTS: Mean filter run-time was significantly higher in COVID-19 patients compared to Non-COVID-19 patients (68.4 (95%CI 67.0-69.9) vs. 65.2 (95%CI 63.2-67.2) hours, respectively; log-rank 0.014). COVID-19 patients showed significantly higher activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) throughout the CRRT due to intensified systemic anticoagulation compared to Non-COVID-19 patients (54 (IQR 45-61) vs. 47 (IQR 41-58) seconds, respectively; p < 0.001). A significantly higher incidence of metabolic alkalosis, hypercalcemia and hypernatremia, consistent with reduced filter patency and citrate overload, was observed in COVID-19 patients compared to Non-COVID-19 patients (19.1% vs. 12.7%, respectively; p = 0.04). These metabolic disarrangements were resistant to per-protocol adjustments and disappeared after replacement of the CRRT-filter. CONCLUSIONS: RCA-CRRT in COVID-19 patients with intensified systemic anticoagulation provides an adequate filter lifespan. However, close monitoring of the acid-base balance appears warranted, as these patients tend to develop reduced filter patency leading to a higher incidence of citrate overload and metabolic disturbances. TRIAL REGISTRATION (LOCAL AUTHORITY): EA1/285/20 (Ethikkommission der Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin); date of registration 08.10.2020.

5.
Eur J Immunol ; 2021 Oct 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1479399

ABSTRACT

The interferon pathway, a key antiviral defense mechanism, is being considered as a therapeutic target in COVID-19. Both, substitution of interferon and JAK/STAT inhibition to limit cytokine storms have been proposed. However, little is known about possible abnormalities in STAT signaling in immune cells during SARS-CoV-2 infection. We investigated downstream targets of interferon signaling, including STAT1, STAT2, pSTAT1 and 2, and IRF1, 7 and 9 by flow cytometry in 30 patients with COVID-19, 17 with mild, and 13 with severe infection. We report upregulation of STAT1 and IRF9 in mild and severe COVID-19 cases, which correlated with the IFN-signature assessed by Siglec-1 (CD169) expression on peripheral monocytes. Interestingly, Siglec-1 and STAT1 in CD14+ monocytes and plasmablasts showed lower expression among severe cases compared to mild cases. Contrary to the baseline STAT1 expression, the phosphorylation of STAT1 was enhanced in severe COVID-19 cases, indicating a dysbalanced JAK/STAT signaling that fails to induce transcription of interferon stimulated response elements (ISRE). This abnormality persisted after IFN-α and IFN-γ stimulation of PBMCs from patients with severe COVID-19. Data suggest impaired STAT1 transcriptional upregulation among severely infected patients may represent a potential predictive biomarker and would allow stratification of patients for certain interferon-pathway targeted treatments.

6.
Sci Immunol ; 6(60)2021 06 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1369380

ABSTRACT

Patients with kidney failure are at increased risk for SARS-CoV-2 infection making effective vaccinations a critical need. It is not known how well mRNA vaccines induce B and plasma cell responses in dialysis patients (DP) or kidney transplant recipients (KTR) compared to healthy controls (HC). We studied humoral and B cell responses of 35 HC, 44 DP and 40 KTR. Markedly impaired anti-BNT162b2 responses were identified among KTR and DP compared to HC. In DP, the response was delayed (3-4 weeks after boost) and reduced with anti-S1 IgG and IgA positivity in 70.5% and 68.2%, respectively. In contrast, KTR did not develop IgG responses except one patient who had a prior unrecognized infection and developed anti-S1 IgG. The majority of antigen-specific B cells (RBD+) were identified in the plasmablast or post-switch memory B cell compartments in HC, whereas RBD+ B cells were enriched among pre-switch and naïve B cells from DP and KTR. The frequency and absolute number of antigen-specific circulating plasmablasts in the cohort correlated with the Ig response, a characteristic not reported for other vaccinations. In conclusion, these data indicated that immunosuppression resulted in impaired protective immunity after mRNA vaccination, including Ig induction with corresponding generation of plasmablasts and memory B cells. Thus, there is an urgent need to improve vaccination protocols in patients after kidney transplantation or on chronic dialysis.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Immunocompromised Host , Kidney Transplantation , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunity, Humoral/drug effects , Immunity, Humoral/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Renal Dialysis , SARS-CoV-2 , Transplant Recipients
7.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 16039, 2021 08 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1345587

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) induces lung injury of varying severity, potentially causing severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Pulmonary injury patterns in COVID-19 patients differ from those in patients with other causes of ARDS. We aimed to explore the frequency and pathogenesis of cavitary lung lesions in critically ill patients with COVID-19. Retrospective study in 39 critically ill adult patients hospitalized with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 including lung injury of varying severity in a tertiary care referral center during March and May 2020, Berlin/Germany. We observed lung cavitations in an unusually large proportion of 22/39 (56%) COVID-19 patients treated on intensive care units (ICU), including 3/5 patients without mechanical ventilation. Median interquartile range (IQR) time between onset of symptoms and ICU admission was 11.5 (6.25-17.75) days. In 15 patients, lung cavitations were already present on the first CT scan, performed after ICU admission; in seven patients they developed during a subsequent median (IQR) observation period of 48 (35-58) days. In seven patients we found at least one cavitation with a diameter > 2 cm (maximum 10 cm). Patients who developed cavitations were older and had a higher body mass index. Autopsy findings in three patients revealed that the cavitations reflected lung infarcts undergoing liquefaction, secondary to thrombotic pulmonary artery branch occlusions. Lung cavitations appear to be a frequent complication of severely ill COVID-19 patients, probably related to the prothrombotic state associated with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Lung/pathology , Pulmonary Embolism/pathology , Aged , COVID-19/complications , Critical Illness , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Pulmonary Embolism/etiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
8.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 13325, 2021 06 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1281739

ABSTRACT

COVID 19 is associated with a hypercoagulable state and frequent thromboembolic complications. For how long this acquired abnormality lasts potentially requiring preventive measures, such as anticoagulation remains to be delineated. We used viscoelastic rotational thrombelastometry (ROTEM) in a single center cohort of 13 critical ill patients and performed follow up examinations three months after discharge from ICU. We found clear signs of a hypercoagulable state due to severe hypofibrinolysis and a high rate of thromboembolic complications during the phase of acute illness. Three month follow up revealed normalization of the initial coagulation abnormality and no evidence of venous thrombosis in all thirteen patients. In our cohort the coagulation profile was completely normalized three months after COVID-19. Based on these findings, discontinuation of anticoagulation can be discussed in patients with complete venous reperfusion.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Blood Coagulation Disorders , COVID-19 , Thrombelastography , Thromboembolism , Venous Thrombosis , Aged , Blood Coagulation , Blood Coagulation Disorders/drug therapy , Blood Coagulation Disorders/pathology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Severity of Illness Index , Thromboembolism/drug therapy , Thromboembolism/pathology , Venous Thrombosis/drug therapy , Venous Thrombosis/pathology
9.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 10678, 2021 05 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238016

ABSTRACT

With an urgent need for bedside imaging of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), this study's main goal was to assess inter- and intraobserver agreement in lung ultrasound (LUS) of COVID-19 patients. In this single-center study we prospectively acquired and evaluated 100 recorded ten-second cine-loops in confirmed COVID-19 intensive care unit (ICU) patients. All loops were rated by ten observers with different subspeciality backgrounds for four times by each observer (400 loops overall) in a random sequence using a web-based rating tool. We analyzed inter- and intraobserver variability for specific pathologies and a semiquantitative LUS score. Interobserver agreement for both, identification of specific pathologies and assignment of LUS scores was fair to moderate (e.g., LUS score 1 Fleiss' κ = 0.27; subpleural consolidations Fleiss' κ = 0.59). Intraobserver agreement was mostly moderate to substantial with generally higher agreement for more distinct findings (e.g., lowest LUS score 0 vs. highest LUS score 3 (median Fleiss' κ = 0.71 vs. 0.79) or air bronchograms (median Fleiss' κ = 0.72)). Intraobserver consistency was relatively low for intermediate LUS scores (e.g. LUS Score 1 median Fleiss' κ = 0.52). We therefore conclude that more distinct LUS findings (e.g., air bronchograms, subpleural consolidations) may be more suitable for disease monitoring, especially with more than one investigator and that training material used for LUS in point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) should pay refined attention to areas such as B-line quantification and differentiation of intermediate LUS scores.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Point-of-Care Systems , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Monitoring, Physiologic , Observer Variation , Prospective Studies , Ultrasonography
11.
Kidney Int Rep ; 6(4): 905-915, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169160

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important complication in COVID-19, but its precise etiology has not fully been elucidated. Insights into AKI mechanisms may be provided by analyzing the temporal associations of clinical parameters reflecting disease processes and AKI development. Methods: We performed an observational cohort study of 223 consecutive COVID-19 patients treated at 3 sites of a tertiary care referral center to describe the evolvement of severe AKI (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes stage 3) and identify conditions promoting its development. Descriptive statistics and explanatory multivariable Cox regression modeling with clinical parameters as time-varying covariates were used to identify risk factors of severe AKI. Results: Severe AKI developed in 70 of 223 patients (31%) with COVID-19, of which 95.7% required kidney replacement therapy. Patients with severe AKI were older, predominantly male, had more comorbidities, and displayed excess mortality. Severe AKI occurred exclusively in intensive care unit patients, and 97.3% of the patients developing severe AKI had respiratory failure. Mechanical ventilation, vasopressor therapy, and inflammatory markers (serum procalcitonin levels and leucocyte count) were independent time-varying risk factors of severe AKI. Increasing inflammatory markers displayed a close temporal association with the development of severe AKI. Sensitivity analysis on risk factors of AKI stage 2 and 3 combined confirmed these findings. Conclusion: Severe AKI in COVID-19 was tightly coupled with critical illness and systemic inflammation and was not observed in milder disease courses. These findings suggest that traditional systemic AKI mechanisms rather than kidney-specific processes contribute to severe AKI in COVID-19.

13.
Nephrologe ; : 1-5, 2020 Dec 22.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-986661

ABSTRACT

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent and severe complication in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients in the intensive care unit. The development of COVID-19 associated AKI is closely linked to the severity of the disease course. The main risk factor for kidney failure requiring kidney replacement therapy is the necessity for invasive ventilation, whereby the onset of renal failure is often closely associated with the timing of intubation. Additionally, the risk factors for a severe course of COVID-19 have been shown to also be risk factors for renal failure. AKI in COVID-19 shows a high mortality and in some patients leads to chronic kidney disease; however, full recovery of kidney function in survivors who need dialysis is not uncommon. With respect to prevention and treatment of renal failure associated with COVID-19, the same recommendations as for AKI from other causes are valid (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes, KDIGO bundles). Due to the large numbers of patients in the setting of overwhelmed resources, the availability of extracorporeal renal replacement procedures can become critical, especially since hypercoagulation is frequent in COVID­19. In order to avoid triage situations, in some centers acute peritoneal dialysis was used as an alternative to extracorporeal procedures.

14.
Brain Behav Immun ; 93: 415-419, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-987109

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 intensive care patients can present with neurological syndromes, usually in the absence of SARS-CoV-2 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The recent finding of some virus-neutralizing antibodies cross-reacting with brain tissue suggests the possible involvement of specific autoimmunity. DESIGN: Blood and CSF samples from eleven critically ill COVID-19 patients presenting with unexplained neurological symptoms including myoclonus, oculomotor disturbance, delirium, dystonia and epileptic seizures, were analyzed for anti-neuronal and anti-glial autoantibodies. RESULTS: Using cell-based assays and indirect immunofluorescence on unfixed murine brain sections, all patients showed anti-neuronal autoantibodies in serum or CSF. Antigens included intracellular and neuronal surface proteins, such as Yo or NMDA receptor, but also various specific undetermined epitopes, reminiscent of the brain tissue binding observed with certain human monoclonal SARS-CoV-2 antibodies. These included vessel endothelium, astrocytic proteins and neuropil of basal ganglia, hippocampus or olfactory bulb. CONCLUSION: The high frequency of autoantibodies targeting the brain in the absence of other explanations suggests a causal relationship to clinical symptoms, in particular to hyperexcitability (myoclonus, seizures). Several underlying autoantigens and their potential molecular mimicry with SARS-CoV-2 still await identification. However, autoantibodies may already now explain some aspects of multi-organ disease in COVID-19 and can guide immunotherapy in selected cases.


Subject(s)
Autoantibodies/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , Central Nervous System Diseases/virology , Aged , Autoantigens , Autoimmunity , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
15.
Crit Care ; 24(1): 676, 2020 12 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-962957

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is emerging evidence for enhanced blood coagulation in coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) patients, with thromboembolic complications contributing to morbidity and mortality. The mechanisms underlying this prothrombotic state remain enigmatic. Further data to guide anticoagulation strategies are urgently required. METHODS: We used viscoelastic rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) in a single-center cohort of 40 critically ill COVID-19 patients. RESULTS: Clear signs of a hypercoagulable state due to severe hypofibrinolysis were found. Maximum lysis, especially following stimulation of the extrinsic coagulation system, was inversely associated with an enhanced risk of thromboembolic complications. Combining values for maximum lysis with D-dimer concentrations revealed high sensitivity and specificity of thromboembolic risk prediction. CONCLUSIONS: The study identifies a reduction in fibrinolysis as an important mechanism in COVID-19-associated coagulopathy. The combination of ROTEM and D-dimer concentrations may prove valuable in identifying patients requiring higher intensity anticoagulation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Fibrinolysis/physiology , Thrombelastography/methods , Thromboembolism/diagnosis , Blood Coagulation/physiology , Blood Coagulation Tests/methods , Blood Coagulation Tests/standards , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cohort Studies , Critical Illness/epidemiology , Critical Illness/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Point-of-Care Systems/standards , Point-of-Care Systems/statistics & numerical data , Thromboembolism/diagnostic imaging , Viscoelastic Substances/analysis , Viscoelastic Substances/therapeutic use
16.
Radiol Case Rep ; 15(10): 1764-1768, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-654505

ABSTRACT

A 64-year-old female patient presented with severe dyspnea shortly after apparent recovery from COVID-19 disease. Chest computed tomography revealed central pulmonary embolism and ultrasonography showed a deep vein thrombosis of her right leg. The patient was tachycardiac with evidence of right ventricular strain on echocardiography. An interdisciplinary decision for interventional therapy was made. Angiographic aspiration thrombectomy resulted in a significant reduction of thrombus material and improved flow in the pulmonary arteries and immediate marked clinical improvement and subsequent normalization of functional echocardiographic parameters. This case adds to the emerging evidence for severe thromboembolic complications following COVID-19 and suggests aspiration thrombectomy can be considered in pulmonary embolism of intermediate risk.

17.
Curr Opin Rheumatol ; 32(5): 449-457, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-648790

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The current review highlights recent insights into direct antiviral effects by antimalarials against severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-CoV-2 and other viruses and their potential indirect effects on the host by avoiding exaggerated immune responses (reduced cytokine release, Toll-like receptor response, antigen presentation related to lysosomal processing). RECENT FINDINGS: Currently, there is a large debate on the use of antimalarials for prophylaxis and treatment of SARS-CoV-2-induced disease based on preclinical in-vitro data, small case series and extrapolation from earlier studies of their effect on intracellular pathogens, including many viruses. Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) or chloroquine have not demonstrated robust efficacy in prior randomized controlled studies against several other viruses. In-vitro data indicate a reduced viral replication of SARS-CoV-2. Especially immunomodulatory effects of antimalarials might also contribute to a clinical efficacy. For SARS-CoV-2 various large studies will provide answers as to whether antimalarials have a place in prophylaxis or treatment of the acute virus infection with SARS-CoV-2 but compelling data are missing so far. SUMMARY: In-vitro data provide a theoretical framework for an efficacy of antimalarials in SARS-CoV-2-induced disease but clinical proof is currently missing.


Subject(s)
Antimalarials/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Animals , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Chloroquine/therapeutic use , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Infection ; 48(4): 619-626, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-597401

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has spread worldwide causing a global health emergency. Pa-COVID-19 aims to provide comprehensive data on clinical course, pathophysiology, immunology and outcome of COVID-19, to identify prognostic biomarkers, clinical scores, and therapeutic targets for improved clinical management and preventive interventions. METHODS: Pa-COVID-19 is a prospective observational cohort study of patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection treated at Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin. We collect data on epidemiology, demography, medical history, symptoms, clinical course, and pathogen testing and treatment. Systematic, serial blood sampling will allow deep molecular and immunological phenotyping, transcriptomic profiling, and comprehensive biobanking. Longitudinal data and sample collection during hospitalization will be supplemented by long-term follow-up. RESULTS: Outcome measures include the WHO clinical ordinal scale on day 15 and clinical, functional, and health-related quality-of-life assessments at discharge and during follow-up. We developed a scalable dataset to (i) suit national standards of care, (ii) facilitate comprehensive data collection in medical care facilities with varying resources, and (iii) allow for rapid implementation of interventional trials based on the standardized study design and data collection. We propose this scalable protocol as blueprint for harmonized data collection and deep phenotyping in COVID-19 in Germany. CONCLUSION: We established a basic platform for harmonized, scalable data collection, pathophysiological analysis, and deep phenotyping of COVID-19, which enables rapid generation of evidence for improved medical care and identification of candidate therapeutic and preventive strategies. The electronic database accredited for interventional trials allows fast trial implementation for candidate therapeutic agents. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Registered at the German registry for clinical studies (DRKS00021688).


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Registries , Berlin/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , Biological Specimen Banks , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Management , Humans , Observational Studies as Topic , Pandemics , Phenotype , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome , World Health Organization
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