Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 5 de 5
Filter
1.
World Neurosurg ; 146: e747-e754, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-997588

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 has affected the global provision of neurosurgical services. We sought to review the impact of COVID-19 on the neurosurgical services in Africa. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was distributed to African neurosurgeons seeking to review demographics, national and neurosurgical preparedness, and change in clinical services in April 2020. RESULTS: A total of 316 responses from 42 countries were received. Of these, 81.6% of respondents were male and 79.11% were under the age of 45 years. In our sample, 123 (38.92%) respondents were in training. Most (94.3%) respondents stated they had COVID-19 cases reported in their country as of April 2020. Only 31 (41.50%) had received training on managing COVID-19. A total of 173 (54.70%) respondents were not performing elective surgery. There was a deficit in the provision of personal protective equipment (PPE): surgical masks (90.80%), gloves (84.80%), N95 masks (50.80%), and shoe covers (49.10%). Health ministry (80.40%), World Health Organization (74.50%), and journal papers (41.40%) were the most common sources of information on COVID-19. A total of 43.60% had a neurosurgeon in the COVID-19 preparedness team; 59.8% were concerned they may contract COVID-19 at work with a further 25.90% worried they may infect their family. Mental stress as a result of COVID-19 was reported by 14.20% of respondents. As of April 2020, 73.40% had no change in their income. CONCLUSIONS: Most African countries have a national COVID-19 policy response plan that is not always fully suited to the local neurosurgery services. There is an ongoing need for PPE and training for COVID-19 preparedness. There has been a reduction in clinical activities both in clinic and surgeries undertaken.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Neurosurgeons/trends , Neurosurgical Procedures/trends , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adult , Africa/epidemiology , Aged , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neurosurgical Procedures/methods
3.
Neurosurg Focus ; 49(6): E18, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-954494

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused dramatic changes in medical education. Social distancing policies have resulted in the rapid adoption of virtual learning (VL) by neurosurgeons as a method to exchange knowledge, but it has been met with variable acceptance. The authors surveyed neurosurgeons from around the world regarding their opinions about VL and how they see the future of neurosurgical conferences. METHODS: The authors conducted a global online survey assessing the experience of neurosurgeons and trainees with VL activities. They also questioned respondents about how they see the future of on-site conferences and scientific meetings. They analyzed responses against demographic data, regions in which the respondents practice, and socioeconomic factors by using frequency histograms and multivariate logistic regression models. RESULTS: Eight hundred ninety-one responses from 96 countries were received. There has been an increase in VL activities since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. Most respondents perceive this type of learning as positive. Respondents from lower-income nations and regions such as Europe and Central Asia were more receptive to these changes and wanted to see further movement of educational activities (conferences and scientific meetings) into a VL format. The latter desire may be driven by financial savings from not traveling. Most queried neurosurgeons indicated that virtual events are likely to partially replace on-site events. CONCLUSIONS: The pandemic has improved perceptions of VL, and despite its limitations, VL has been well received by the majority of neurosurgeons. Lower-income nations in particular are embracing this technology. VL is still evolving, but its integration with traditional in-person meetings seems inevitable.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/methods , Neurosurgeons/education , Neurosurgical Procedures/education , Neurosurgical Procedures/methods , Surveys and Questionnaires , Education, Distance/trends , Humans , Internationality , Neurosurgeons/trends , Neurosurgical Procedures/trends , Telecommunications/trends
4.
World Neurosurg ; 147: e8-e15, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-917449

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Containment measures for COVID-19 have affected surgical training globally. We sought to assess how neurosurgical training has been affected across Africa in April 2020. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was distributed to African Neurosurgical trainees seeking to review demographics and effects of COVID on training. RESULTS: A total of 123 neurosurgery trainees responded from 23 African countries and a further 6 were abroad. A total of 91.80% were men, and 96.70% were training in public institutions. Only 41% had received training in COVID-19 with 61.79% worried that they would contract COVID-19 while performing their clinical duties. There was a marked reduction in clinical activities including a median reduction of elective surgery (-80%), clinics (-83%), and emergency surgery (-38.50%). A total of 23.58% of residents did not receive a formal salary, with 50% on less than $1000 USD gross per month. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first continental survey of neurosurgery trainees in Africa. COVID-19 has significantly affected clinical and learning opportunities. There are concerns of the long-term effects on their training activities for an uncertain period of time during this pandemic. Although there has been a global increase in e-learning, there is need to evaluate if this is accessible to all trainees.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Income/statistics & numerical data , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Neurosurgery/education , Adult , Africa/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Education, Distance , Emergencies , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Neurosurgery ; 87(4): 854-856, 2020 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-641027

ABSTRACT

Even though neurosurgeons exercise these enormous and versatile skills, the COVID-19 pandemic has shaken the fabrics of the global neurosurgical family, jeopardizing human lives, and forcing the entire world to be locked down. We stand on the shoulders of the giants and will not forget their examples and their teachings. We will work to the best of our ability to honor their memory. Professor Harvey Cushing said: "When to take great risks; when to withdraw in the face of unexpected difficulties; whether to force an attempted enucleation of a pathologically favorable tumor to its completion with the prospect of an operative fatality, or to abandon the procedure short of completeness with the certainty that after months or years even greater risks may have to be faced at a subsequent session-all these require surgical judgment which is a matter of long experience." It is up to us, therefore, to keep on the noble path that we have decided to undertake, to accumulate the surgical experience that these icons have shown us, the fruit of sacrifice and obstinacy. Our tribute goes to them; we will always remember their excellent work and their brilliant careers that will continue to enlighten all of us.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/history , Neurosurgery/history , Pandemics/history , Pneumonia, Viral/history , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , History, 21st Century , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL