Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 9 de 9
Filter
1.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-295147

ABSTRACT

Background: The fear of testing positive for COVID-19 infection has created panic among patients and families and discouraged some people from being tested and receiving medical care. Migrants and refugees are among the vulnerable populations that suffered disproportionately from the COVID-19 crisis. However, their experiences with COVID-19 positivity status have not been investigated. This study aimed to explore the physical, mental, and psychosocial impact of a positive COVID-19 diagnosis on Syrian refugees living in Jordan. Methods: : Using a qualitative approach, twenty phone interviews were conducted with ten adult Syrian refugees living within the camp and ten refugees living in non-camp (host-community) settings. A follow-up interviews with five health care providers in the refugee camp were conducted to explore the services and support given to the refugees with COVID-19 infection. The findings were thematically analysed using Braun & Clarke's six-phase framework. Results: : Physical effects of a positive COVID-19 status varied according to the seriousness of the condition but affected most participants' lifestyle by adopting more precautionary measures and caring for their physical health. Self-isolation and fear to infect others were common themes identified among all participants living within community settings. Resorting to friends and family members for mental and psychological support was the only option available for all participants. Refugees living within the community preferred to manage their condition at home utilizing traditional remedies and avoided being tested for financial reasons, poor healthcare access and fear of being identified. Refugees living within camps had better access to testing, healthcare, and disease management and did not experience fear of being deported. They did not display worries and feelings of shame and guilt, which were feelings expressed by refugees living within the community. Both groups suffered mental and psychosocial health impacts, as well as social isolation and fear of death and disease complications. Conclusions: : COVID-19 infection has negatively impacted refugees’ well-being with noticeable disparities across the different living conditions. While mental health impact seems to be standardized, refugees living within host-community may need more support into managing their condition, accessibility to free testing as well as treatment and healthcare services.

2.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-293530

ABSTRACT

Background: The fear of testing positive for COVID-19 infection has created panic among patients and families and discouraged some people from being tested and receiving medical care. Migrants and refugees are among the vulnerable populations that suffered disproportionately from the COVID-19 crisis. However, their experiences with COVID-19 positivity status have not been investigated. This study aimed to explore the physical, mental, and psychosocial impact of a positive COVID-19 diagnosis on Syrian refugees living in Jordan. Methods: : Using a qualitative approach, twenty phone interviews were conducted with ten adult Syrian refugees living within the camp and ten refugees living in non-camp (host-community) settings. A follow-up interviews with five health care providers in the refugee camp were conducted to explore the services and support given to the refugees with COVID-19 infection. The findings were thematically analysed using Braun & Clarke's six-phase framework. Results: : Physical effects of a positive COVID-19 status varied according to the seriousness of the condition but affected most participants' lifestyle by adopting more precautionary measures and caring for their physical health. Self-isolation and fear to infect others were common themes identified among all participants living within community settings. Resorting to friends and family members for mental and psychological support was the only option available for all participants. Refugees living within the community preferred to manage their condition at home utilizing traditional remedies and avoided being tested for financial reasons, poor healthcare access and fear of being identified. Refugees living within camps had better access to testing, healthcare, and disease management and did not experience fear of being deported. They did not display worries and feelings of shame and guilt, which were feelings expressed by refugees living within the community. Both groups suffered mental and psychosocial health impacts, as well as social isolation and fear of death and disease complications. Conclusions: : COVID-19 infection has negatively impacted refugees’ well-being with noticeable disparities across the different living conditions. While mental health impact seems to be standardized, refugees living within host-community may need more support into managing their condition, accessibility to free testing as well as treatment and healthcare services.

3.
Int J Public Health ; 66: 1604369, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542390

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Providing medical care during a global pandemic exposes healthcare workers (HCW) to a high level of risk, causing anxiety and stress. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of anxiety and psychological distress among HCWs during COVID-19. Methods: We invited HCWs from 3 hospitals across the United Arab Emirates (UAE) to participate in an anonymous online survey between April 19-May 3, 2020. The GAD-7 and K10 measures were used to assess anxiety and psychological distress. Logistic regression models assessed associations between knowledge, attitude, worry, and levels of anxiety and psychological distress. Results: A total of 481 HCWs participated in this study. The majority of HCWs were female (73.6%) and aged 25-34 years (52.6%). More than half were nurses (55.7%) and had good knowledge of COVID-19 (86.3%). Over a third (37%) of HCWs reported moderate/severe psychological distress in the K10 measure and moderate/severe anxiety (32.3%) in the GAD-7, with frontline workers significantly reporting higher levels of anxiety (36%). Knowledge of COVID-19 did not predict anxiety and psychological distress, however, HCWs who believed COVID-19 was difficult to treat and those who perceived they were at high risk of infection had worse mental health outcomes. Worry about spreading COVID-19 to family, being isolated, contracting COVID-19 and feeling stigmatized had 1.8- to 2.5-fold increased odds of symptoms of mental health problems. Additionally, HCWs who felt the need for psychological support through their workplace showed increased odds of psychological distress. Conclusion: HCWs in the UAE reported a high prevalence of psychological distress and anxiety while responding to the challenges of COVID-19. The findings from this study emphasize the public, emotional and mental health burden of COVID-19 and highlight the importance for health systems to implement, monitor, and update preventive policies to protect HCWs from contracting the virus while also providing psychological support in the workplace.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Anxiety/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United Arab Emirates/epidemiology
4.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0260321, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542188

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Following the emergency approval of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccines, research into its vaccination hesitancy saw a substantial increase. However, the psychological behaviors associated with this hesitancy are still not completely understood. This study assessed the psychological antecedents associated with COVID-19 vaccination in the Arab population. METHODOLOGY: The validated Arabic version of the 5C questionnaire was distributed online across various social media platforms in Arabic-speaking countries. The questionnaire had three sections, namely, socio-demographics, COVID-19 related infection and vaccination, and the 5C scale of vaccine psychological antecedents of confidence, complacency, constraints, calculation, and collective responsibility. RESULTS: In total, 4,474 participants with a mean age of 32.48 ± 10.76 from 13 Arab countries made up the final sample, 40.8% of whom were male. Around 26.7% of the participants were found to be confident about the COVID-19 vaccination, 10.7% indicated complacency, 96.5% indicated they had no constraints, 48.8% had a preference for calculation and 40.4% indicated they had collective responsibility. The 5C antecedents varied across the studied countries with the confidence and collective responsibility being the highest in the United Arab Emirates (59.0% and 58.0%, respectively), complacency and constraints in Morocco (21.0% and 7.0%, respectively) and calculation in Sudan (60.0%). The regression analyses revealed that sex, age, educational degrees, being a health care professional, history of COVID-19 infection and having a relative infected or died from COVID-19 significantly predicted the 5C psychological antecedents by different degrees. CONCLUSION: There are wide psychological antecedent variations between Arab countries, and different determinants can have a profound effect on the COVID-19 vaccine's psychological antecedents.

5.
BMJ Open ; 11(10): e052993, 2021 10 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462971

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Sharps injuries, including needlestick injuries and splash exposures, constitute serious occupational health problems for healthcare workers, carrying the risk of bloodborne infections. However, data on such occupational incidents and their risk factors in healthcare settings are scarce and not systematically summarised in the Arab countries.The aim of this study is to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to review published literature about sharps injuries and splash exposures of healthcare workers in Arab countries, with the objectives to determine the incidence and/or prevalence of these events, their identified risk factors and the applied preventive and postexposure prophylactic measures. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The protocol is developed in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Protocol guidelines. A comprehensive presearch developed in January to March 2021 in the database PubMed will be followed by a systematic search of six, core medical and health science databases: PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, CINAHL, Web of Science and Africa-Wide Information in May 2021. The search will be performed without any filters or restrictions for publication years. Covidence systematic review tool will be used for document management, blinded screening and study selection. Two reviewers will independently screen the records, extract data and conduct risk of bias assessment. Results will be synthesised narratively in summary tables, and, if findings allow, meta-analysis will be conducted on the incidence and/or prevalence of sharps injuries and splash exposures, and on the effect size of risk factors. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The systematic review methodology does not require ethics approval due to the nature of the study design based only on published studies. The results of the systematic review will be published in a peer-reviewed journal, disseminated to stakeholders and made publicly available. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42021242416.


Subject(s)
Needlestick Injuries , Arabs , Delivery of Health Care , Health Personnel , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Needlestick Injuries/epidemiology , Research Design , Systematic Reviews as Topic
6.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0255408, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1405337

ABSTRACT

In response to the global COVID-19 epidemic, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) government is taking precautionary action to mitigate the spread of the virus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge and practices toward COVID-19 among the general public in the UAE during the current outbreak. A cross-sectional online survey of 1356 respondents in the UAE was conducted during the epidemic outbreak between 9th to 24th June-2020. The questionnaire consisted of three sections: Socio-demographic, knowledge, practices. Independent-samples t-test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), chi-square and binary logistic regression was used. A p-value of (p < 0.05) was considered statistically significant. The total correct score of knowledge and practice questions was high 85% and 90%, respectively. Male's sex, other marital status, and illiterate/primary educational levels had a lower level of knowledge and practices than others. Participants aged 18-29 had little higher knowledge than other ages but had a lower level in practices, people who live in Abu Dhabi had better knowledge and practices than other emirates, employed people had a lower level of knowledge but higher in practices. Binary logistic regression analysis presented that females, 18-29 years, and married participants significantly associated with a higher score of knowledge, while female, over 30 years old, the martial status of singles, college-level and higher, unemployed, were significantly associated with high mean practices score. This study provided a full screening of the knowledge and practices among a sample of residents in The UAE toward COVID-19, continuing to implement the health education programs pursued by the UAE is highly important to maintain the appropriate level of awareness among the public.


Subject(s)
Awareness , COVID-19/psychology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Arab Emirates
7.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0254595, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1374135

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the Arab countries, there has not been yet a specific validated Arabic questionnaire that can assess the psychological antecedents of COVID-19 vaccine among the general population. This study, therefore, aimed to translate, culturally adapt, and validate the 5C scale into the Arabic language. METHODS: The 5C scale was translated into Arabic by two independent bilingual co-authors, and then translated back into English. After reconciling translation disparities, the final Arabic questionnaire was disseminated into four randomly selected Arabic countries (Egypt, Libya, United Arab Emirates (UAE), and Saudi Arabia). Data from 350 Arabic speaking adults (aged ≥18 years) were included in the final analysis. Internal consistency was assessed by Cronbach's alpha. Construct validity was determined by concurrent, convergent, discriminant, exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. RESULTS: Age of participants ranged between 18 to 73 years; 57.14% were females, 37.43% from Egypt, 36.86%, from UAE, 30% were healthcare workers, and 42.8% had the intention to get COVID-19 vaccines. The 5 sub-scales of the questionnaire met the criterion of internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha ≥0.7). The predictors of intention to get COVID-19 vaccines (concurrent validity) were young age and the 5C sub-scales. Convergent validity was identified by the significant inter-item and item-mean score of the sub-scale correlation (P<0.001). Discriminant validity was reported as inter-factor correlation matrix (<0.7). Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin sampling adequacy measure was 0.80 and Bartlett's sphericity test was highly significant (P<0.001). Exploratory factor analysis indicated that the 15 items of the questionnaire could be summarized into five factors. Confirmatory factor analysis confirmed that the hypothesized five-factor model of the 15-item questionnaire was satisfied with adequate psychometric properties and fit with observed data (RMSEA = 0.060, GFI = 0.924, CFI = 0.957, TLI = 0.937, SRMR = 0.076 & NFI = 906). CONCLUSION: The Arabic version of the 5C scale is a valid and reliable tool to assess the psychological antecedents of COVID-19 vaccine among Arab population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Vaccination/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Cultural Comparison , Egypt , Female , Humans , Libya , Male , Middle Aged , Psychometrics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Saudi Arabia , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Arab Emirates , Young Adult
8.
J Prim Care Community Health ; 12: 21501327211018568, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238691

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: One of the newly faced challenges during the COVID-19 is vaccine hesitancy (VH). The validated 5C scale, that assesses 5 psychological antecedents of vaccination, could be effective in exploring COVID-19 VH. This study aimed to determine a statistically valid cutoff points for the 5C sub-scales among the Arab population. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 446 subjects from 3 Arab countries (Egypt, United Arab Emirates (UAE), and Jordan). Information regarding sociodemographics, clinical history, COVID-19 infection and vaccination history, and 5C scale were collected online. The 5C scores were analyzed to define the cutoff points using the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) and to verify the capability of the questionnaire to differentiate whether responders are hesitant or non-hesitant to accept vaccination. ROC curve analysis was conducted for previous vaccine administration as a response, with the predictors being the main 5 domains of the 5C questionnaire. The mean score of each sub-scale was compared with COVID-19 vaccine intake. RESULTS: The mean age of the studied population was 37 ± 11, 42.9% were males, 44.8% from Egypt, 21.1% from Jordan, and 33.6% from the UAE. Statistically significant differences between vaccinated and unvaccinated participants, respectively, were detected in the median score of confidence [6.0(1.3) versus 4.7(2.0)], complacency [(2.7(2.0) versus 3.0(2.0)], constraints [1.7(1.7) versus 3.7(2.3)], and collective responsibility [6.7(1.7) versus 5.7(1.7)]. The area under the curve of the 5 scales was 0.72, 0.60, 0.76, 0.66, 0.66 for confidence, complacency, constraints, calculation, and collective responsibility at cutoff values of 5.7, 4.7, 6.0, 6.3, and 6.2, respectively. CONCLUSION: The Arabic validated version of the 5C scale has a good discriminatory power to predict COVID-19 vaccines antecedent.


Subject(s)
Arabs/psychology , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Vaccination/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Cross-Sectional Studies , Egypt , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2
9.
BMC Psychiatry ; 21(1): 224, 2021 05 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1215102

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The psychosocial impact of previous infectious disease outbreaks in adults has been well documented, however, there is limited information on the mental health impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on adults and children in the United Arab Emirate (UAE) community. The aim of this study was to explore anxiety levels among adults and children in the UAE and to identify potential risk and protective factors for well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Using a web-based cross-sectional survey we collected data from 2200 self-selected, assessed volunteers and their children. Demographic information, knowledge and beliefs about COVID-19, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) using the (GAD-7) scale, emotional problems in children using the strengths and difficulties questionnaire (SDQ), worry and fear about COVID-19, coping mechanisms and general health information were collected. Descriptive analysis was carried out to summarize demographic and participant characteristics, Chi-square analysis to explore associations between categorical variables and anxiety levels and multivariable binary logistic regression analysis to determine predictors of anxiety levels in adults and emotional problems in children. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of GAD in the general population was 71% with younger people (59.8%) and females (51.7%) reporting highest levels of anxiety. Parents who were teachers reported the highest percentage of emotional problems in children (26.7%). Adjusted multivariable logistic regression for GAD-7 scores showed that being female, high levels of worry associated with COVID-19, intention to take the COVID-19 vaccine and smoking were associated with higher levels of anxiety. Adjusted multivariable logistic regression for SDQ showed that higher emotional problems were reported for children in lower and higher secondary education, and parents who had severe anxiety were seven times more likely to report emotional problems in their children. CONCLUSIONS: This study reports the psychological impact of COVID-19 among adults and children in the UAE and highlights the significant association between parental and child anxiety. Findings suggest the urgency for policy makers to develop effective screening and coping strategies for parents and especially children.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , COVID-19 Vaccines , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , United Arab Emirates/epidemiology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...