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1.
Front Immunol ; 12: 798859, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581315

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in saliva serve as first line of defense against the virus. They are present in the mucosa, more precisely in saliva, after a recovered infection and also following vaccination. We report here the antibody persistence in plasma and in saliva up to 15 months after mild COVID-19. The IgG antibody response was measured every two months in 72 participants using an established and validated in-house ELISA assay. In addition, the virus inhibitory activity of plasma antibodies was assessed in a surrogate virus neutralization test before and after vaccination. SARS-CoV-2-specific antibody concentrations remained stable in plasma and saliva and the response was strongly boosted after one dose COVID-19 vaccination.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Saliva/immunology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 14471, 2021 07 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1310815

ABSTRACT

Early detection of severe forms of COVID-19 is absolutely essential for timely triage of patients. We longitudinally followed-up two well-characterized patient groups, hospitalized moderate to severe (n = 26), and ambulatory mild COVID-19 patients (n = 16) at home quarantine. Human D-dimer, C-reactive protein (CRP), ferritin, cardiac troponin I, interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels were measured on day 1, day 7, day 14 and day 28. All hospitalized patients were SARS-CoV-2 positive on admission, while all ambulatory patients were SARS-CoV-2 positive at recruitment. Hospitalized patients had higher D-dimer, CRP and ferritin, cardiac troponin I and IL-6 levels than ambulatory patients (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p = 0.016, p = 0.035, p = 0.002 respectively). Hospitalized patients experienced significant decreases in CRP, ferritin and IL-6 levels from admission to recovery (p < 0.001, p = 0.025, and p = 0.001 respectively). Cardiac troponin I levels were high during the acute phase in both hospitalized and ambulatory patients, indicating a potential myocardial injury. In summary, D-dimer, CRP, ferritin, cardiac troponin I, IL-6 are predictive laboratory markers and can largely determine the clinical course of COVID-19, in particular the prognosis of critically ill COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Ambulatory Care , Biomarkers/blood , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , Early Diagnosis , Ferritins/blood , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Follow-Up Studies , Hospitalization , Humans , Interleukin-6/blood , Longitudinal Studies , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Precision Medicine , Prognosis , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Troponin I/blood
3.
Int J Infect Dis ; 106: 265-268, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279605

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Use of hydroxychloroquine in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was widespread and uncontrolled until recently. Patients vulnerable to severe COVID-19 are at risk of hydroxychloroquine interactions with co-morbidities and co-medications contributing to detrimental, including fatal, adverse treatment effects. METHODS: A retrospective survey was undertaken of health conditions and co-medications of patients with COVID-19 who were pre-screened for enrolment in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled hydroxychloroquine multi-centre trial. RESULTS: The survey involved 305 patients [median age 71 (interquartile range 59-81) years]. The majority of patients (n = 279, 92%) considered for inclusion in the clinical trial were not eligible, mainly due to safety concerns caused by health conditions or co-medications. The most common were QT-prolonging drugs (n = 188, 62%) and haematologic/haemato-oncologic diseases (n = 39, 13%) which prohibited the administration of hydroxychloroquine. In addition, 165 (54%) patients had health conditions and 167 (55%) patients were on co-medications that did not prohibit the use of hydroxychloroquine but had a risk of adverse interactions with hydroxychloroquine. The most common were diabetes (n = 86, 28%), renal insufficiency (n = 69, 23%) and heart failure (n = 58, 19%). CONCLUSION: The majority of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 had health conditions or took co-medications precluding safe treatment with hydroxychloroquine. Therefore, hydroxychloroquine should be administered with extreme caution in elderly patients with COVID-19, and only in clinical trials.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Hydroxychloroquine/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Comorbidity , Contraindications, Drug , Drug Interactions , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies
4.
Int J Infect Dis ; 106: 29-32, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1258382

ABSTRACT

Indirect effects of the COVID-19 pandemic have the potential to seriously undermine the health system in sub-Saharan Africa with an increase in the incidences of malaria, tuberculosis (TB) and HIV infections. Based on current evidence in the African region the collateral impact of COVID-19 on the "big three diseases" shall be addressed in the following.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Malaria/epidemiology , Syndemic , Tuberculosis/epidemiology , Africa South of the Sahara/epidemiology , Humans , Incidence , Pandemics
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