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1.
Pathogens ; 11(6)2022 Jun 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1884299

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Given the impact of COVID-19 on the world healthcare system, and the efforts of the healthcare community to find prognostic factors for hospitalization, disease progression, and mortality, the aim of the present study was to investigate the prognostic impact of transaminases and bilirubin levels at admission to hospital on disease progression and mortality in COVID-19 patients. METHODS: Using the CoviCamp database, we performed a multicenter, observational, retrospective study involving 17 COVID-19 Units in southern Italy. We included all adult patients hospitalized for SARS-CoV-2 infection with at least one determination at hospital admission of aminotransaminases and/or total bilirubin. RESULTS: Of the 2054 patients included in the CoviCamp database, 1641 were included in our study; 789 patients (48%) were considered to have mild COVID-19, 347 (21%) moderate COVID-19, 354 (22%) severe COVID-19, and 151 patients (9%) died during hospitalization. Older age (odds ratio (OR): 1.02; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.03), higher Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) (OR 1.088; 95%CI 1.005-1.18), presence of dementia (OR: 2.20; 95% CI: 1.30-3.73), higher serum AST (OR: 1.002; 95% CI: 1.0001-1.004), and total bilirubin (OR: 1.09; 95% CI: 1.002-1.19) values were associated with a more severe clinical outcome. Instead, the 151 patients who died during hospitalization showed a higher serum bilirubin value at admission (OR 1.1165; 95% CI: 1.017-1.335); the same did not apply for AST. DISCUSSION: Patients with COVID-19 with higher levels of AST and bilirubin had an increased risk of disease progression.

2.
Biology (Basel) ; 11(4)2022 Apr 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1792833

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic led to the hospitalization of an unselected population with the possibility to evaluate the epidemiology of viral hepatitis. Thus, a retrospective multicenter study was conducted in an area of Southern Italy with the aim of assessing the prevalence of HCV and HBV markers and the ability of current screening program to capture cases. We evaluated 2126 hospitalized patients in seven COVID Centers of Naples and Caserta area in which 70% of the Campania population lives. HBsAg and HCV-Ab prevalence was 1.6% and 5.1%, respectively, with no differences between gender. Decade distribution for birth year shows a bimodal trend of HCV prevalence, with a peak (11.6%) in the decade 1930-1939 and a second peak (5.6%) for those born in 1960-1969. An analysis of the screening period imposed by the Italian government for those born between 1969 and 1989 shows that only 17% of cases of HCV infection could be captured. A small alignment of the screening period, i.e., those born from 1960 to 1984, would capture 40% of cases. The data confirm the high endemicity of our geographical area for hepatitis virus infections and underline the need for a tailored screening program according to the regional epidemiology.

5.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0256903, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406751

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: During COVID-19 pandemic, the use of several drugs has represented the worldwide clinical practice. However, though the current increase of knowledge about the disease, there is still no effective treatment for the usage of drugs. Thus, we retrospectively assessed use and effects of therapeutic regimens in hospitalized patients on in-hospital mortality. METHODS: COVOCA is a retrospective observational cohort study on 18 COVID centres throughout Campania Region Hospitals. We included adult patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection, discharged/dead between March/June 2020. RESULTS: 618 patients were included, with an overall in-hospital cumulative mortality incidence of 23.1%. Most prescribed early treatments were antivirals (72%), antibiotics (65%) and hydroxychloroquine/anticoagulants (≈50%). Tocilizumab, indeed, was largely prescribed late during hospitalization. Multivariable models, with a cut-off at day 2 for early COVID-19 therapy administration, did not disclose any significant association of a single drug administration on the clinical outcome. DISCUSSION: COVOCA represents the first multicenter database in Campania region. None drug class used during the pandemic significantly modified the outcome, regardless of therapy beginning, both overall and net of those already in non-invasive ventilation (NIV)/ orotracheal intubation (OTI) at hospitalization. Our cumulative incidence of mortality seems lower than other described during the same period, particularly in Northern Italy.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/mortality , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Respiratory Therapy , Retrospective Studies
7.
Front Oncol ; 11: 662746, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1241185

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to compare coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) severity presentation between oncologic and non-oncologic patients and to evaluate the impact of cancer type and stage on COVID-19 course. METHODS: We performed a multicentre, retrospective study involving 13 COVID-19 Units in Campania region from February to May 2020. We defined as severe COVID-19 presentation the cases that required mechanical ventilation and/or admission to Intensive Care Units (ICU) and/or in case of death. RESULTS: We enrolled 371 COVID-19 patients, of whom 34 (9.2%) had a history or a diagnosis of cancer (24 solid, 6 onco-hematological). Oncologic patients were older (p<0.001), had more comorbidities (p<0.001) and showed a higher rate of severe COVID-19 presentation (p=0.001) and of death (p<0.001). Compared to 12 patients with non-active cancer and to 337 without cancer, the 17 patients with active cancer had more comorbidities and showed a higher rate of severe COVID-19 and of mortality (all p values <0.001). Compared to the 281 non-severe patients, the 90 subjects with a severe presentation of COVID-19 were older (p<0.01), with more comorbidities (p<0.001) and with a higher rate of cancer (p=0.001). At multivariate analysis, age (OR 1.08, 95% CI: 1.04-1.11) and suffering from cancer in an active stage (OR 5.33, 95% CI: 1.77-16.53) were independently associated with severe COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Since the higher risk of severe evolution of COVID-19, cancer patients, especially those with an active malignancy, should be candidates for early evaluation of symptoms and early treatment for COVID-19.

8.
J Med Virol ; 93(5): 2654-2661, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196514

ABSTRACT

A novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) is responsible for a severe acute respiratory syndrome called coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). It is originated in Wuhan, China, in December 2019. Due to its extreme transmissibility with droplets and human contacts, in a few months, it has become a pandemic. Nowadays, no effective therapy is available, and the scientific community is moving to find a therapeutic choice to fight this silent enemy. Studies are ongoing on several therapeutic options, including antiviral agents, immunomodulant drugs, and immunotherapy. Due to viral features, including the ability to start an inflammatory response that seems to be the fulcrum of COVID-19 pathogenic action, immunotherapy could represent a promising alternative waiting for the vaccine. High-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), already used in other infectious diseases, could represent an effective help. The aim of this narrative review is to reassemble the clinical experiences on the use of IVIg in COVID-19 and the rationale of its use.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/immunology , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Inflammation/immunology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , China , Cross Reactions , Humans , Immunotherapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther ; 19(9): 1125-1134, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1122062

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically challenged the national health systems worldwide in the last months. Dalbavancin is a novel antibiotic with a long plasmatic half-life and simplified weekly administration regimens, thus representing a promising option for the outpatient treatment of Gram-positive infections and the early discharge of hospitalized patients. Dalbavancin is approved for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs). Many preliminary data seem to support its use in other indications, such as osteomyelitis, prosthetic joint infections, and infective endocarditis. AREAS COVERED: A search in the literature using validated keywords (dalbavancin, Gram-positive infections, Gram-positive cocci, ABSSSI, intravenous treatment, and long-acting antibiotics) was conducted on biomedical bibliographic databases (PubMed and Embase) from 2004 to 30 September 2020. Results were analyzed during two consensus conferences with the aim to review the current evidence on dalbavancin in Gram-positive infections, mainly ABSSSI, osteomyelitis, and infective endocarditis, highlight the main limitations of available studies and suggest possible advantages of the molecule. EXPERT OPINION: The board identifies some specific subgroups of patients with ABSSSIs who could mostly benefit from a treatment with dalbavancin and agrees that the design of homogenous and robust studies would allow a broader use of dalbavancin even in other clinical settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , Teicoplanin/analogs & derivatives , Ambulatory Care/methods , Animals , Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Drug Administration Schedule , Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Humans , Skin Diseases, Bacterial/drug therapy , Skin Diseases, Bacterial/microbiology , Teicoplanin/administration & dosage , Teicoplanin/pharmacology
10.
PLoS One ; 15(12): e0243700, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-966684

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Italy has been the first Western country to be heavily affected by the spread of SARS-COV-2 infection and among the pioneers of the clinical management of pandemic. To improve the outcome, identification of patients at the highest risk seems mandatory. OBJECTIVES: Aim of this study is to identify comorbidities and clinical conditions upon admission associated with in-hospital mortality in several COVID Centers in Campania Region (Italy). METHODS: COVOCA is a multicentre retrospective observational cohort study, which involved 18 COVID Centers throughout Campania Region, Italy. Data were collected from patients who completed their hospitalization between March-June 2020. The endpoint was in-hospital mortality, assessed either from data at discharge or death certificate, whilst all exposure variables were collected at hospital admission. RESULTS: Among 618 COVID-19 hospitalized patients included in the study, 143 in-hospital mortality events were recorded, with a cumulative incidence of about 23%. At multivariable logistic analysis, male sex (OR 2.63, 95%CI 1.42-4.90; p = 0.001), Chronic Liver Disease (OR 5.88, 95%CI 2.39-14.46; p<0.001) and malignancies (OR 2.62, 95%CI 1.21-5.68; p = 0.015) disclosed an independent association with a poor prognosis, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and Respiratory Severity Scale allowed to identify at higher mortality risk. Sensitivity analysis further enhanced these findings. CONCLUSION: Mortality of patients hospitalized for COVID-19 appears strongly affected by both clinical conditions on admission and comorbidities. Originally, we observed a very poor outcome in subjects with a chronic liver disease, alongside with an increase of hepatic damage.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Liver Diseases/epidemiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Chronic Disease , Comorbidity , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Liver Diseases/diagnosis , Liver Diseases/mortality , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
12.
J Neurosurg Sci ; 65(1): 1-7, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-593345

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has fast spread throughout the world in more than 200 countries, resulting in the need for a de-prioritization of elective medical care to face the demands of the global health crisis. Although the acute and catastrophic phase of the pandemic seems to have been left behind, it is also clear that the virus will not disappear soon, and we must live with it for a period of unpredictable length, the COVID-19 era. In this setting, a common coordinated approach to treat patients harboring brain tumors is urgently required to guarantee the best updated oncological care and to reduce the risk of viral infection during hospitalization. The study group on Neuro-oncology of Italian Society of Neurosurgery, SINCh gathered pieces of evidence and data and would like to suggest a practice protocol of care for neurosurgical oncologic procedures in the COVID-19 era. The present document aimed at summarizing current evidence and expert opinions to help neurosurgeons in taking decisions on their patients harboring different brain tumors.


Subject(s)
Brain Neoplasms/therapy , COVID-19 , Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic , Neurosurgery/trends , Pandemics , Brain Neoplasms/surgery , Clinical Decision-Making , Disease Management , Glioma/surgery , Glioma/therapy , Guidelines as Topic , Humans , Italy , Neoplasm Metastasis , Neurosurgery/standards , Neurosurgical Procedures
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