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1.
J Parkinsons Dis ; 10(4): 1343-1353, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-982796

ABSTRACT

Since the initial reports of COVID-19 in December 2019, the world has been gripped by the disastrous acute respiratory disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. There are an ever-increasing number of reports of neurological symptoms in patients, from severe (encephalitis), to mild (hyposmia), suggesting the potential for neurotropism of SARS-CoV-2. This Perspective investigates the hypothesis that the reliance on self-reporting of hyposmia has resulted in an underestimation of neurological symptoms in COVID-19 patients. While the acute effect of the virus on the nervous system function is vastly overshadowed by the respiratory effects, we propose that it will be important to monitor convalescent individuals for potential long-term implications that may include neurodegenerative sequelae such as viral-associated parkinsonism. As it is possible to identify premorbid harbingers of Parkinson's disease, we propose long-term screening of SARS-CoV-2 cases post-recovery for these expressions of neurodegenerative disease. An accurate understanding of the incidence of neurological complications in COVID-19 requires long-term monitoring for sequelae after remission and a strategized health policy to ensure healthcare systems all over the world are prepared for a third wave of the virus in the form of parkinsonism.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Parkinsonian Disorders/psychology , Parkinsonian Disorders/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Agnosia/virology , COVID-19 , Coinfection/complications , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology
2.
Mov Disord Clin Pract ; 7(4): 361-372, 2020 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-259913

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting a relatively small proportion of the global population, its effects have already reached everyone. The pandemic has the potential to differentially disadvantage chronically ill patients, including those with Parkinson's disease (PD). The first health care reaction has been to limit access to clinics and neurology wards to preserve fragile patients with PD from being infected. In some regions, the shortage of medical staff has also forced movement disorders neurologists to provide care for patients with COVID-19. OBJECTIVE: To share the experience of various movement disorder neurologists operating in different world regions and provide a common approach to patients with PD, with a focus on those already on advanced therapies, which may serve as guidance in the current pandemic and for emergency situations that we may face in the future. CONCLUSION: Most of us were unprepared to deal with this condition given that in many health care systems, telemedicine has been only marginally available or only limited to email or telephone contacts. In addition, to ensure sufficient access to intensive care unit beds, most elective procedures (including deep brain stimulation or the initiation of infusion therapies) have been postponed. We all hope there will soon be a time when we will return to more regular hospital schedules. However, we should consider this crisis as an opportunity to change our approach and encourage our hospitals and health care systems to facilitate the remote management of chronic neurological patients, including those with advanced PD.

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