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2.
J Inflamm Res ; 14: 3123-3128, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1315920

ABSTRACT

Objective: Patients with rheumatic immune diseases were more likely to develop severe or critical COVID-19. We aimed to determine whether rheumatoid factor antibodies were present in COVID patients and the level and type of rheumatoid factor antibodies produced in COVID-19 patients were related to the degree of the patient's condition. The study also aimed to determine the prevalence and characteristics of rheumatoid factor antibodies in patients with COVID-19. Methods: Sera collected from 129 patients with COVID-19 were tested for rheumatoid factor antibodies by ELISA. Five patients were tracked for several months to monitor dynamic changes of these antibodies. Results: Rheumatoid-associated autoantibodies were detected in 20.16% of patients (26/129) following infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). In addition, IgM-RF was primarily present in critically ill patients, while IgA-RF was mainly present in mild patients. Five patients were able to track for several months to monitor dynamic changes of these antibodies. Rheumatoid factor antibodies peaks in the later phase of the disease and last for longer time. Anti-Jo-1 antibody was found in one of the five patients. Conclusion: This was the case series report that rheumatoid-associated autoantibodies are present in patients with COVID-19. The clinical significance of these antibodies was not fully understood and needed further characterization. These autoantibodies are related to the severity of the patient's disease and exist for a long time in the patient's body, while their impact on the patient's health is unknown.

3.
Cytokine ; 143: 155523, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1163610

ABSTRACT

Cytokines play pleiotropic, antagonistic, and collaborative in viral disease. The high morbidity and mortality of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) make it a significant threat to global public health. Elucidating its pathogenesis is essential to finding effective therapy. A retrospective study was conducted on 71 patients hospitalized with COVID-19. Data on cytokines, T lymphocytes, and other clinical and laboratory characteristics were collected from patients with variable disease severity. The effects of cytokines on the overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) of patients were analyzed. The critically severe and severe patients had higher infection indexes and significant multiple organ function abnormalities than the mild patients (P < 0.05). IL-6 and IL-10 were significantly higher in the critically severe patients than in the severe and mild patients (P < 0.05). IL-6 and IL-10 were closely associated with white blood cells, neutrophils, T lymphocyte subsets, D-D dimer, blood urea nitrogen, complement C1q, procalcitonin C-reactive protein. Moreover, the IL-6 and IL-10 levels were closely correlated to dyspnea and dizziness (P < 0.05). The patients with higher IL-10 levels had shorter OS than the group with lower levels (P < 0.05). The older patients with higher levels of single IL-6 or IL-10 tended to have shorter EFS (P < 0.05), while the patients who had more elevated IL-6 and IL-10 had shorter OS (P < 0.05). The Cox proportional hazard model revealed that IL-6 was the independent factor affecting EFS. IL-6 and IL-10 play crucial roles in COVID-19 prognosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/pathology , Interleukin-10/blood , Interleukin-6/blood , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aging , Blood Coagulation Factors/analysis , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Female , Humans , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/cytology , Thromboembolism/pathology , Treatment Outcome
4.
Epidemiol Infect ; 148: e293, 2020 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-952350

ABSTRACT

The epidemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) began in China and had spread rapidly to many other countries. This study aimed to identify risk factors associated with delayed negative conversion of SARS-CoV-2 in COVID-19 patients. In this retrospective single-centre study, we included 169 consecutive patients with confirmed COVID-19 in Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University from 15th January to 2nd March. The cases were divided into two groups according to the median time of SARS-CoV-2 negative conversion. The differences between groups were compared. In total, 169 patients had a median virus negative conversion time of 18 days (interquartile range: 11-25) from symptom onset. Compared with the patients with short-term negative conversion, those with long-term conversion had an older age, higher incidence of comorbidities, chief complaints of cough and chest distress/breath shortness and severer illness on admission, higher level of leucocytes, neutrophils, aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), lower level of CD3+CD4+ lymphocytes and albumin and more likely to receive mechanical ventilation. In multivariate analysis, cough, leucocytes, neutrophils and ESR were positively correlated with delayed virus negative conversion, and CD3+CD4+ lymphocytes were negatively correlated. The integrated indicator of leucocytes, neutrophils and CD3+CD4+ lymphocytes showed a good performance in predicting the negative conversion within 2 weeks (area under ROC curve (AUC) = 0.815), 3 weeks (AUC = 0.804), 4 weeks (AUC = 0.812) and 5 weeks (AUC = 0.786). In conclusion, longer quarantine periods might be more justified for COVID-19 patients with cough, higher levels of leucocytes, neutrophils and ESR and lower levels of CD3+CD4+ lymphocytes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Epidemics , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , RNA, Viral/analysis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Time Factors
5.
Clin Microbiol Infect ; 27(2): 253-257, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-838644

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The outbreak of the 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in Wuhan, China, has subsided after being hard hit by the disease and subsequent city lockdown. Information on the number of people involved in Wuhan is still inadequate. This study aimed to describe the screening results of 61 437 community members in Wuchang District, Wuhan. METHODS: In mid-May 2020, Wuhan launched a population-scale city-wide SARS-CoV-2 testing campaign, which aimed to perform nucleic acid and viral antibody testing for citizens in Wuhan. Here we show the screening results of cluster sampling of 61 437 residents in Wuchang District, Wuhan, China. RESULTS: A total of 1470 (2.39%, 95% CI 2.27-2.52) individuals were detected positive for at least one antiviral antibody. Among the positive individuals, 324 (0.53%, 95% CI 0.47-0.59) and 1200 (1.95%, 95% CI 1.85-2.07) were positive for immunoglobulin IgM and IgG, respectively, and 54 (0.08%, 95% CI 0.07-0.12) were positive for both antibodies. The positive rate of female carriers of antibodies was higher than those of male counterparts (male-to-female ratio of 0.75), especially in elderly citizens (ratio of 0.18 in 90+ age subgroup), indicating a sexual discrepancy in seroprevalence. In addition, viral nucleic acid detection using real-time PCR had showed 8 (0.013%, 95% CI 0.006-0.026) asymptomatic virus carriers. DISCUSSION: The seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 in Wuhan was low. Most Wuhan residents are still susceptible to this virus. Precautions, such as wearing mask, frequent hand hygiene and proper social distance, are necessary before an effective vaccine or antiviral treatments are available.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mass Screening/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Age Distribution , Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Testing , China/epidemiology , Cities/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Male , RNA, Viral/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Seroepidemiologic Studies
8.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 9(1): 1974-1983, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-714084

ABSTRACT

Dynamic changes of RNA and antibodies in SARS-CoV-2 infected patients remain largely unknown, and influence factors for antibody production have not been fully clarified. In this study, consecutive throat swabs specimens (n = 1875) from 187 patients were collected to analyse the dynamic changes of RNA. Moreover, 162 serial serum samples from 31 patients were tested for seroconversion of IgM and IgG. Meanwhile, IgM and IgG were also detected in 409 COVID-19 patients and 389 controls. Additionally, the logistic regression analysis was executed to identify the possible influence factors for antibody production. The median positive conversion time for RNA was day 7 (IQR, 3-11), and the positive rate was highest in day 1-5 (74.59 %) and then gradually decreased. The median time of seroconversion for IgM and IgG were both day 12 (IQR, 10-15). The sensitivity and specificity for IgM (or IgG) was 87.04% and 96.92%, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression indicated that reduced lymphocytes and short positive conversion time for SARS-CoV-2 RNA were independent factors for negative results of IgM and IgG. In conclusion, RNA and antibodies should be combined for COVID-19 diagnosis, and delayed seroconversion was influenced by the decreased lymphocytes and short positive conversion time for RNA.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , RNA, Viral/isolation & purification , Aged , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/immunology , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pharynx/virology , RNA, Viral/genetics , Retrospective Studies , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity , Seroconversion
9.
Metabolism ; 107: 154243, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-602136

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become a global threat to public health. The lipid pathophysiology in COVID-19 is unknown. METHODS: In this retrospective longitudinal study, we monitored the serum lipids in 17 surviving and 4 non-surviving COVID-19 cases prior to their viral infections and duration the entire disease courses. RESULTS: In surviving cases, the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels decreased significantly on admission as compared with the levels before infection; the LDL levels remained constantly low during the disease progression and resumed to the original levels when patients recovered (pre-infection: 3.5 (3.0-4.4); on admission: 2.8 (2.3-3.1), p < 0.01; progression: 2.5 (2.3-3.0); discharge: 3.6 (2.7-4.1); median (IQR), in mmol/L). In non-surviving patients, LDL levels showed an irreversible and continuous decrease until death (1.1 (0.9-1.2), p = 0.02 versus the levels on admission). The ratio changes of LDL levels inversely correlated with ratio changes of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels. Logistic regression analysis showed increasing odds of lowered LDL levels associated with disease progression (odds ratio: 4.48, 95% IC: 1.55-12.92, p = 0.006) and in-hospital death (odds ratio: 21.72, 95% IC: 1.40-337.54, p = 0.028). CONCLUSIONS: LDL levels inversely correlated to disease severities, which could be a predictor for disease progress and poor prognosis.


Subject(s)
Cholesterol, LDL/blood , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Aged , Betacoronavirus , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19 , China , Comorbidity , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
10.
J Infect ; 81(1): e28-e32, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-46420

ABSTRACT

An outbreak of new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 was occurred in Wuhan, China and rapidly spread to other cities and nations. The standard diagnostic approach that widely adopted in the clinic is nucleic acid detection by real-time RT-PCR. However, the false-negative rate of the technique is unneglectable and serological methods are urgently warranted. Here, we presented the colloidal gold-based immunochromatographic (ICG) strip targeting viral IgM or IgG antibody and compared it with real-time RT-PCR. The sensitivity of ICG assay with IgM and IgG combinatorial detection in nucleic acid confirmed cases were 11.1%, 92.9% and 96.8% at the early stage (1-7 days after onset), intermediate stage (8-14 days after onset), and late stage (more than 15 days), respectively. The ICG detection capacity in nucleic acid-negative suspected cases was 43.6%. In addition, the concordance of whole blood samples and plasma showed Cohen's kappa value of 0.93, which represented the almost perfect agreement between two types of samples. In conclusion, serological ICG strip assay in detecting SARS-CoV-2 infection is both sensitive and consistent, which is considered as an excellent supplementary approach in clinical application.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Immunoassay/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Serologic Tests , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
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