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1.
Vaccines ; 10(9):1478, 2022.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-2010349

ABSTRACT

China started to implement COVID-19 vaccination programs for children in July 2021. This study investigated the changes in parents' COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy for children before and after the vaccination program rollout. Repeated cross-sectional online surveys among full-time adult factory workers were conducted in Shenzhen, China. This analysis was based on 844 (first round) and 1213 parents (second round) who had at least one child aged 3–17 years. The prevalence of vaccine hesitancy for children aged 3–11 years dropped from 25.9% (first round) to 17.4% (second round), while such a prevalence for children aged 12–17 years dropped from 26.0% (first round) to 3.5% (second round) (p < 0.001). Positive attitudes, a perceived subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control related to children's COVID-19 vaccination were associated with lower vaccine hesitancy in both rounds. In the second round and among parents with children aged 3–11 years, negative attitudes and exposure to information on SARS-CoV-2 infection after receiving a primary vaccine series were associated with higher vaccine hesitancy, while exposure to experiences shared by vaccine recipients and infectiousness of variants of concern were associated with lower vaccine hesitancy. Regular monitoring of vaccine hesitancy and its associated factors among parents should be conducted to guide health promotion.

2.
Vaccines ; 10(9):1453, 2022.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-2010334

ABSTRACT

A significant decline in pediatric vaccination uptake due to the COVID-19 pandemic has been documented. Little is known about the parental willingness and associated factors of pediatric vaccination during the COVID-19 pandemic. An extensive literature search in the databases of PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and EBSCOhost were conducted. A total of 20 eligible studies published from 2020–2022 were included for systematic summary by a thematic analysis, among which 12 studies were included in a meta-analysis conducted with R-4.2.1. The prevalence of parental willingness to childhood/routine vaccination and seasonal influenza vaccination was 58.6% (95%CI 2.8–98.6%) and 47.3% (95%CI 25.3–70.5%). Moreover, there is no sufficient evidence of significant change in parental willingness to childhood/routine vaccination, human papillomavirus vaccination, or pneumococcal conjugate vaccination during the pandemic. However, a significant increase in parental willingness to vaccinate their children against seasonal influenza was found. In addition to the factors of parental vaccination willingness/hesitancy that are well-studied in literature, children/parents' history of COVID-19 and children's perceived vulnerability to COVID-19 were associated with parental willingness. Developing synergetic strategies to promote COVID-19 vaccination together with other pediatric vaccination is warranted during the pandemic. This may help to improve and/or catch up the vaccine uptake of children during and/or after the COVID-19 pandemic.

3.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 10(6)2022 Jun 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1988034

ABSTRACT

A COVID-19 vaccine booster dose is effective and safe for older adults. This study investigated facilitators and barriers to take up a COVID-19 vaccine booster dose among older adults in Hong Kong. Participants were Chinese-speaking community-dwelling adults aged ≥65 years. Telephone numbers were randomly selected from up-to-date telephone directories. A total of 395 participants completed the telephone interview. Logistic regression models were fitted. Among the participants, 31.6% received a COVID-19 vaccine booster dose. After adjustment for significant background characteristics, positive attitudes toward the booster dose, perceiving significant others would support them to receive the booster dose, and less uncertainty regarding the choice of the booster dose was associated with higher uptake of a COVID-19 vaccine booster dose. Concerns about poorer responses to the booster dose due to older age and the presence of chronic conditions were negatively associated with the dependent variable. In addition, the belief that governmental promotional materials could address their concern and were helpful for them to make decisions was associated with a higher COVID-19 vaccine booster dose uptake. Improving booster dose health promotion materials, modifying perceptions, involving significant others and reducing uncertainty are potentially useful strategies to improve COVID-19 vaccine booster dose uptake among older adults.

4.
Frontiers in medicine ; 9, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1905491

ABSTRACT

Background The Coronavirus Diseases 2019 (COVID-19) directly affects HIV prevention and sexual health services utilization among men who have sex with men (MSM). This study investigated changes in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing utilization among MSM before and after the COVID-19 pandemic received initial control in Shenzhen, China. Methods This study was a sub-analysis of a prospective observational cohort study conducted among MSM in Shenzhen, China between August 2020 and May 2021. Participants were recruited through outreaching in gay venues, online recruitment, and peer referral. Participants completed a baseline online survey between August and September 2020 and a follow-up online survey between April and May 2021. This study was based on 412 MSM who reported to be HIV-negative/unknown sero-status at baseline, 297 (72.1%) of them completed the follow-up online survey. Multilevel logistic regression models (level 1: sources of recruitment;level 2: individual participants) were fitted. Results When comparing follow-up data with baseline data, a significant increase was observed in the uptake of any type of HIV testing (77.9% at Month 6 vs. 59.2% at baseline, p < 0.001). After adjusting for age group, education level, current employment status and monthly personal income, two predisposing factors were associated with higher uptake of HIV testing during the follow-up period. They were: (1) condomless anal intercourse with male non-regular male sex partners at follow-up only (AOR: 5.29, 95%CI: 1.27, 22.01) and (2) sanitizing before and after sex at baseline (AOR: 1.26, 95%CI: 1.02, 1.47). Regarding enabling factors, utilization of HIV testing (AOR: 3.90, 95%CI: 2.27, 6.69) and STI testing (AOR: 2.43, 95%CI: 1.20, 4.93) 6 months prior to the baseline survey was associated with higher uptake of HIV testing during the follow-up period. Having the experience that HIV testing service providers reduced service hours during the follow-up period was also positively associated with the dependent variable (AOR: 3.45, 95%CI: 1.26, 9.41). Conclusions HIV testing utilization among MSM might rebound to the level before the COVID-19 outbreak after the pandemic received initial control in China. This study offered a comprehensive overview to identify potential reasons that can influence the uptake of HIV testing among Chinese MSM.

5.
Frontiers in medicine ; 9, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1905473

ABSTRACT

People living with HIV (PLWH), if infected with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), had an increased risk of mortality compared to people without HIV infection. They are considered as a priority group to receive COVID-19 vaccination. This cross-sectional online survey investigated the prevalence of and factors associated with COVID-19 vaccination uptake among 2740 PLWH aged 18–65 years in eight Chinese metropolitan cities between January and February 2021. As validated by requesting participants to send an image of receipt hiding personal identification, 6.2% of PLWH had taken up COVID-19 vaccination. Participants living in cities where individuals could make an appointment to receive COVID-19 vaccination reported significantly higher uptake than those living in cities without such allowance (11.0 vs. 2.9%, p < 0.001). Being a member of priority groups to receive vaccination, concerning about the side effects of COVID-19 vaccination and its interaction with HIV treatment, and exposing to information on the Internet/social media supporting PLWH to receive COVID-19 vaccination were significantly associated with COVID-19 vaccination uptake in both groups of participants. Receiving advice from the staff of community-based organizations supporting COVID-19 vaccination was associated with higher uptake among participants living in cities where individuals could make an appointment to receive such vaccination, while a shortage in COVID-19 vaccine supply was associated with a lower uptake among participants living in other cities. Our findings presented a snapshot of COVID-19 vaccination uptake among PLWH in the early phase of vaccine rollout in China. It provided a knowledge basis to formulate interventions promoting COVID-19 vaccination for PLWH.

6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(11)2022 06 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1884137

ABSTRACT

The indoor lighting environment is a key factor affecting human health and safety. In particular, people have been forced to study or work more for long periods of time at home due to the COVID-19 pandemic. In this study, we investigate the influence of physical indoor environmental factors, correlated color temperature (CCT), and illumination on computer work fatigue. We conducted a within-subject experiment consisting of a 10 min-long task test under two different illumination settings (300 lx and 500 lx) and two CCTs (3000 K and 4000 K). Physiological signals, such as electroencephalogram (EEG), electrocardiograph (ECG), and eye movement, were monitored during the test to objectively measure fatigue. The subjective fatigue of eight participants was evaluated based on a questionnaire conducted after completing the test. The error rate of the task test was taken as the key factor representing the working performance. Through the analysis of the subjective and objective results, computer work fatigue was found to be significantly impacted by changes in the lighting environment, where human fatigue was negatively correlated with illumination and CCT. Improving the illumination and CCT of the work environment, within the scope of this study, helped to decrease the fatigue degree-that is, the fatigue degree was the lowest under the 4000 K + 500 lx environment, while it was relatively high at 3000 K + 300 lx. Under indoor environment conditions, the CCT factor was found to have the greatest effect on computer work fatigue, followed by illumination. The presented results are expected to be a valuable reference for improving the satisfaction associated with the lighting environment and to serve as guidance for researchers and reviewers conducting similar research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lighting , COVID-19/epidemiology , Computers , Fatigue , Humans , Pandemics
7.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 10(5)2022 May 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1862940

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 vaccination is proven to be effective and safe for older adults. This study investigated the impacts of incentives and health promotional materials provided by the government on the completion of the primary COVID-19 vaccination series among older adults in Hong Kong. Participants were Chinese-speaking community-dwelling adults aged ≥65 years. Telephone numbers were randomly selected from up-to-date Hong Kong telephone directories. A total of 440 participants completed the telephone interview. Logistic regression models were fitted. Among the participants, 58.4% had completed the primary COVID-19 vaccination series. Most participants believed that incentives provided by the government had almost no impact on increasing their motivation to receive COVID-19 vaccination, and less than half thought that vaccination promotional materials produced by the government could address their concerns and help them make decisions. After adjustment for significant background characteristics, we found perceived higher impacts of the incentives and belief that vaccination promotional materials produced by the government could address their concern and were helpful for them to make decisions to be associated with a higher rate of completion of primary COVID-19 vaccination series. Perceptions supporting COVID-19 vaccination and less decisional conflict regarding the choice of vaccine were also positively associated with the dependent variable. Government should develop incentives and health promotional materials tailored to the needs of older adults.

8.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 8(5): e30070, 2022 05 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1834135

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has created disruptions in HIV prevention and sexual health services for men who have sex with men (MSM). OBJECTIVE: This study compared HIV testing utilization in 3 different reference periods (period 1: before the COVID-19 outbreak, November 2019-January 2020; period 2: after the outbreak, February-April 2020; and period 3: after the pandemic was under initial control, May-July 2020). Factors associated with HIV testing utilization after the COVID-19 outbreak (combined periods 2 and 3) were also investigated. METHODS: Participants were MSM aged ≥18 years living in Shenzhen, China. Those self-reporting as HIV positive were excluded. A total of 595 participants recruited through multiple sources completed a self-administered online survey during August-September 2020. HIV testing utilization after the COVID-19 outbreak was the dependent variable, and multivariate logistic regression models were fitted. RESULTS: HIV testing utilization was significantly lower in period 2 than in period 1 (n=262 vs 363, 44.0% vs 61.0%, P<.001). However, HIV testing utilization was not significantly higher in period 3 than in period 2 (n=277 vs 262, 46.6% vs 44.0%, P=.21). The prevalence of HIV testing utilization after the COVID-19 outbreak was seen in 331 (55.6%) participants. After adjusting for significant background characteristics, condomless anal intercourse (CAI) with regular male sex partners (RPs; adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 2.15, 95% CI 1.29-3.57) and sexualized drug use (SDU; AOR 2.94, 95% CI 1.41-6.06) both before and after the COVID-19 outbreak, CAI with RPs (AOR 2.07, 95% CI 1.06-4.07) and nonregular male sex partners (NRPs; AOR 3.57, 95%CI: 1.43-8.89) only after the COVID-19 outbreak was positively associated with the dependent variable. Regarding HIV prevention service utilization, HIV testing utilization before the COVID-19 outbreak (AOR 10.75, 95% CI 7.22-16.02) and the use of sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing (AOR 7.02, 95% CI 4.10-12.02), other HIV/STI prevention (AOR 3.15, 95% CI 2.16-4.60), and preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP; AOR 3.58, 95% CI 1.54-8.34) after the COVID-19 outbreak were associated with higher HIV testing utilization. The current perceived risk of HIV infection was higher than that before the COVID-19 outbreak (AOR 1.15, 95% CI 1.01-1.30), and perceived COVID-19 preventive measures taken by HIV testing service providers to be effective (AOR 1.52, 95% CI 1.29-1.78) and perceived higher behavioral control to undergo HIV testing (AOR 1.18, 95% CI 1.00-1.40) were positively associated with HIV testing utilization. Concerns about COVID-19 infection during HIV testing (AOR 0.78, 95% CI 0.68-0.89), avoiding crowded places (AOR 0.68, 95% CI 0.48-0.98), and HIV testing service providers reducing their working hours (AOR 0.59, 95% CI 0.48-0.98) were negatively associated with the dependent variable. CONCLUSIONS: HIV testing utilization among Chinese MSM declined after the COVID-19 outbreak and did not increase after the pandemic was under initial control. Removing structural barriers to accessing HIV testing caused by COVID-19, modifying perceptions related to HIV testing, and making use of HIV self-testing (HIVST) might be useful strategies to improve HIV testing among MSM during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Sexual and Gender Minorities , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , HIV Infections/diagnosis , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/prevention & control , HIV Testing , Homosexuality, Male , Humans , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology
9.
Analyst ; 147(10): 2247-2252, 2022 May 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1815639

ABSTRACT

Effective identification and real-time inactivation of pathogenic microorganisms is of great importance for preventing their infection and spread in public health, especially considering the huge threat of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Herein, a novel multifunctional colorimetric sensor array with 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) as a single probe has been constructed. TMB can be efficiently oxidized to generate oxidized TMB (oxTMB) by HAuCl4, which displays four characteristic absorption peaks. The presence of different bacteria could inhibit the oxidation reaction and cause diverse changes in the intensity of the four characteristic peaks. Based on linear discriminant analysis (LDA), not only are nine kinds of pathogenic bacteria successfully identified, but also drug-resistant strains are distinguished from sensitive ones. Interestingly, HAuCl4 can be employed as a germicidal agent to inactivate bacteria during the identification and avoid accessional bacterial contaminations. The developed strategy provides a new and simple avenue for bacterial identification and elimination to effectively protect the public from bacterial contamination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorimetry , Bacteria , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Oxidation-Reduction
10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(9)2022 04 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1809908

ABSTRACT

China started to offer a booster dose of COVID-19 vaccine to members of the adult population in October 2021. This study investigated the behavioral intention to receive a booster dose of COVID-19 vaccine among factory workers who had completed their primary vaccination series. Participants were full-time factory employees at least 18 years of age in Shenzhen, China. In Shenzhen, factory workers need to receive a physical examination every year. The study sites covered all six organizations providing physical examinations for factory workers. All eligible workers attending these sites between 26 and 31 October 2021 were invited to complete an online survey. This study was based on 2329 participants who had completed the primary COVID-19 vaccination series. Two-level logistic regression models were fitted. Among the participants, 84% intended to receive a free booster dose of COVID-19 vaccine within the next six months. After controlling for significant background characteristics, we found that perceptions related to a booster dose as well as interpersonal level factors such as information exposure on social media, thoughtful consideration of the veracity of the information, and satisfaction with vaccine-related promotional materials were determinants of behavioral intention. Factory workers in China reported a high level of behavioral intention to receive a booster dose of the COVID-19 vaccine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Intention , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
11.
European Journal of Psychotraumatology ; 13(1), 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1782284

ABSTRACT

Background Pre-hospitalisation, hospitalisation and post-hospitalisation factors may significantly affect depression, anxiety and post-traumatic growth (PTG) among COVID-19 survivors. Objective Our study investigated depression, anxiety and PTG and their correlates among COVID-19 survivors. Method A cross-sectional telephone survey recruited 199 COVID-19 patients (Mean age = 42.7;53.3% females) at six-month follow-up after hospital discharge in five Chinese cities (i.e. Wuhan, Shenzhen, Zhuhai, Dongguan and Nanning). Their demographic information, clinical records and experiences during (e.g. severity of covid-19 symptoms, treatment and exposure to other patients’ suffering) and after hospitalisation (e.g. perceived impact of covid-19, somatic symptoms after hospitalisation), and psychosocial factors (e.g. perceived discrimination, self-stigma, affiliate stigma, resilience and social support) were investigated. Depressive and anxiety symptoms were measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and the Generalised anxiety disorder (GAD-7) scale, respectively. PTG was examined by the Post-traumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI) instrument. Results The proportion of depressive symptoms <5, ≥5 and <10, ≥10 were 76.9%, 12.0% and 11.1%, respectively. The proportion of anxiety symptoms <5, ≥5 and <10, ≥10 were 77.4%, 15.1% and 7.5%, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression showed that receiving mental health care services during hospitalisation, somatic symptoms after discharge, perceived affiliate stigma and perceived impact of being infected with COVID-19 were significantly and positively associated with probable depression. Significant correlates of probable anxiety also included permanent residents of the city, somatic symptoms after discharge, perceived impact of being infected with COVID-19 and self-stigma. Social support, self-stigma and receiving mental health care services during hospitalisation were positively associated with PTG. Conclusions: The results suggest that post-hospitalisation and psychosocial factors had relatively stronger associations with depression, anxiety and PTG than pre-hospitalisation and hospitalisation factors. Promoting social support and social inclusion may be useful strategies to improve the mental health of COVID-19 survivors. HIGHLIGHTS • Post-hospitalisation and psychosocial factors had relatively stronger associations with depression, anxiety and PTG than pre-hospitalisation and hospitalisation factors, promoting social support and social inclusion may be useful strategies to improve mental health of COVID-19 survivors.

12.
Front Public Health ; 10: 831456, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776033

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination together with good compliance with personal preventive measures may help eradicate the ongoing pandemic. This observational prospective cohort study investigated the changes in compliance with personal preventive measures, depressive symptoms, and sleep quality among factory workers within a 3-month follow-up period. A total of 663 workers were recruited by a stratified multi-stage cluster sampling in March 2020, and all of them completed a follow-up survey three months later. Multilevel logistic and linear regression models (level 1: factories; level 2: individual participants) were fitted. A significant decline was observed in consistent facemask wearing in workplace (from 98.0 to 90.3%, P < 0.001) and in other public spaces (from 97.1 to 94.4%, P = 0.02), sanitizing hands (from 70.9 to 48.0%, P < 0.001), household disinfection (from 47.7 to 37.9%, P < 0.001) and probable depression (from 14.9 to 1.5%, P < 0.001) over the follow-up period. A significant improvement in avoiding crowded places (from 69.8 to 77.4%, P = 0.002) and sleep quality (proportion of participants reporting poor sleep quality dropped from 3.9 to 1.2%, P = 0.002) was also observed. Efforts are needed to maintain compliance with personal preventive measures during the pandemic. Mental health problems were uncommon and likely to be one-off among Chinese factory workers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , China/epidemiology , Health Status , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Prospective Studies
13.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 9: 838973, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775702

ABSTRACT

Background: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has disproportionately affected sexual minorities including men who have sex with men (MSM). This study investigated factors associated with the uptake of COVID-19 vaccination among MSM in China. Methods: Inclusion criteria were: (1) born biologically male, (2) had oral or anal sex with men in the past year, (3) aged at least 18 years, and (4) lived in Shenzhen, China. Prospective participants were recruited through outreach in gay bars and saunas, online recruitment, and peer referrals. Participants completed a baseline online survey between August and September 2020 and a follow-up online survey between April and May 2021. Logistic regression models were fitted for data analysis. Results: Among 420 participants who completed the baseline survey, 303 completed the follow-up survey. Among participants being followed up, 113 (37%) received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccination during the study period. After adjusting for significant sociodemographic characteristics, five baseline predisposing factors predicted COVID-19 vaccination uptake during the follow-up period, including asking whether their partners had COVID-19 symptoms [adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.00-1.38], washing hands before and after sex (AOR: 1.23, 95% CI: 1.03-1.46), sanitizing before and after sex (AOR: 1.17, 95% CI: 1.00-1.37), perceived higher risk of COVID-19 transmission through sexual behaviors (AOR: 1.28, 95% CI: 1.04-1.58), and panic about COVID-19 (AOR: 1.48, 95% CI: 1.16-1.89). Regarding enabling factors, receiving testing for sexually transmitted infections (STI) (AOR: 2.19, 95% CI: 1.25-3.85) and other prevention measures for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/STI (AOR: 2.61, 95% CI: 1.56-4.37) 6 months prior to the baseline survey were associated with higher uptake of COVID-19 vaccination. Conclusion: MSM's uptake rate of COVID-19 vaccination was comparable to that of the general population in Shenzhen, China. This study offered an overview for us to identify tapping points that can encourage COVID-19 vaccination uptake among Chinese MSM.

14.
Eur J Psychotraumatol ; 13(1): 2055294, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1774261

ABSTRACT

Background: Pre-hospitalisation, hospitalisation and post-hospitalisation factors may significantly affect depression, anxiety and post-traumatic growth (PTG) among COVID-19 survivors. Objective: Our study investigated depression, anxiety and PTG and their correlates among COVID-19 survivors. Method: A cross-sectional telephone survey recruited 199 COVID-19 patients (Mean age = 42.7; 53.3% females) at six-month follow-up after hospital discharge in five Chinese cities (i.e. Wuhan, Shenzhen, Zhuhai, Dongguan and Nanning). Their demographic information, clinical records and experiences during (e.g. severity of covid-19 symptoms, treatment and exposure to other patients' suffering) and after hospitalisation (e.g. perceived impact of covid-19, somatic symptoms after hospitalisation), and psychosocial factors (e.g. perceived discrimination, self-stigma, affiliate stigma, resilience and social support) were investigated. Depressive and anxiety symptoms were measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and the Generalised anxiety disorder (GAD-7) scale, respectively. PTG was examined by the Post-traumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI) instrument. Results: The proportion of depressive symptoms <5, ≥5 and <10, ≥10 were 76.9%, 12.0% and 11.1%, respectively. The proportion of anxiety symptoms <5, ≥5 and <10, ≥10 were 77.4%, 15.1% and 7.5%, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression showed that receiving mental health care services during hospitalisation, somatic symptoms after discharge, perceived affiliate stigma and perceived impact of being infected with COVID-19 were significantly and positively associated with probable depression. Significant correlates of probable anxiety also included permanent residents of the city, somatic symptoms after discharge, perceived impact of being infected with COVID-19 and self-stigma. Social support, self-stigma and receiving mental health care services during hospitalisation were positively associated with PTG.Conclusions: The results suggest that post-hospitalisation and psychosocial factors had relatively stronger associations with depression, anxiety and PTG than pre-hospitalisation and hospitalisation factors. Promoting social support and social inclusion may be useful strategies to improve the mental health of COVID-19 survivors. HIGHLIGHTS: • Post-hospitalisation and psychosocial factors had relatively stronger associations with depression, anxiety and PTG than pre-hospitalisation and hospitalisation factors, promoting social support and social inclusion may be useful strategies to improve mental health of COVID-19 survivors.


Antecedentes: Los factores pre-hospitalización, durante la hospitalización y post-hospitalización pueden afectar significativamente la depresión, la ansiedad y el crecimiento postraumático (CPT) en los sobrevivientes de COVID-19.Objetivo: Nuestro estudio investigó la depresión, la ansiedad y el CPT y sus correlatos en sobrevivientes de COVID-19.Método: Una encuesta telefónica transversal reclutó a 199 pacientes con COVID-19 (edad promedio = 42,7; 53,3% mujeres) a los seis meses de seguimiento después del alta hospitalaria en cinco ciudades chinas (Wuhan, Shenzhen, Zhuhai, Dongguan y Nanning). Su información demográfica, registros clínicos y experiencias durante la hospitalización (e.g. gravedad de los síntomas de COVID-19, tratamiento, exposición al sufrimiento de otros pacientes) y después de la hospitalización (e.g. impacto percibido de COVID-19, síntomas somáticos después de la hospitalización) y factores psicosociales (e.g. discriminación percibida, autoestigma, estigma de afiliación, resiliencia, apoyo social) fueron investigados. Los síntomas depresivos y de ansiedad se midieron mediante el Cuestionario de Salud del Paciente (PHQ-9 en su sigla en inglés) y la escala de trastorno de ansiedad generalizada (GAD-7 en su sigla en inglés) respectivamente, el CPT se examinó mediante el instrumento Inventario de Crecimiento Postraumático (PTGI en su sigla en inglés).Resultados: La proporción de síntomas depresivos <5, ≥5 y <10, y ≥10 fue 76,9%, 12,0% y 11,1% respectivamente. La proporción de síntomas de ansiedad <5, ≥5 y <10, y ≥10 fue del 77,4%, 15,1% y 7,5% respectivamente. La regresión logística multivariante mostró que recibir servicios de atención de salud mental durante la hospitalización, los síntomas somáticos después del alta, el estigma de afiliación percibido y el impacto percibido de estar infectado con COVID-19 se asociaron significativa y positivamente con una probable depresión. Los correlatos significativos de ansiedad probable también incluyeron ser residente permanente de la ciudad, síntomas somáticos después del alta, impacto percibido de estar infectado con COVID-19 y autoestigma. El apoyo social, el autoestigma y recibir servicios de salud mental durante la hospitalización se asociaron positivamente con el CPT.Conclusiones: Los resultados sugieren que los factores psicosociales y posteriores a la hospitalización tuvieron asociaciones relativamente más fuertes con la depresión, la ansiedad y el CPT que los factores previos a la hospitalización y hospitalización. Promover el apoyo social y la inclusión social pueden ser estrategias útiles para mejorar la salud mental de los sobrevivientes de COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Medically Unexplained Symptoms , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Patient Discharge , Survivors
15.
Chin Med J (Engl) ; 133(11): 1261-1267, 2020 Jun 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1722623

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The 2019 novel coronavirus has caused the outbreak of the acute respiratory disease in Wuhan, Hubei Province of China since December 2019. This study was performed to analyze the clinical characteristics of patients who succumbed to and who recovered from 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19). METHODS: Clinical data were collected from two tertiary hospitals in Wuhan. A retrospective investigation was conducted to analyze the clinical characteristics of fatal cases of COVID-19 (death group) and we compare them with recovered patients (recovered group). Continuous variables were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test. Categorical variables were analyzed by χ test or Fisher exact test as appropriate. RESULTS: Our study enrolled 109 COVID-19 patients who died during hospitalization and 116 recovered patients. The median age of the death group was older than the recovered group (69 [62, 74] vs. 40 [33, 57] years, Z = 9.738, P < 0.001). More patients in the death group had underlying diseases (72.5% vs. 41.4%, χ = 22.105, P < 0.001). Patients in the death group had a significantly longer time of illness onset to hospitalization (10.0 [6.5, 12.0] vs. 7.0 [5.0, 10.0] days, Z = 3.216, P = 0.001). On admission, the proportions of patients with symptoms of dyspnea (70.6% vs. 19.0%, χ = 60.905, P < 0.001) and expectoration (32.1% vs. 12.1%, χ = 13.250, P < 0.001) were significantly higher in the death group. The blood oxygen saturation was significantly lower in the death group (85 [77, 91]% vs. 97 [95, 98]%, Z = 10.625, P < 0.001). The white blood cell (WBC) in death group was significantly higher on admission (7.23 [4.87, 11.17] vs. 4.52 [3.62, 5.88] ×10/L, Z = 7.618, P < 0.001). Patients in the death group exhibited significantly lower lymphocyte count (0.63 [0.40, 0.79] vs. 1.00 [0.72, 1.27] ×10/L, Z = 8.037, P < 0.001) and lymphocyte percentage (7.10 [4.45, 12.73]% vs. 23.50 [15.27, 31.25]%, Z = 10.315, P < 0.001) on admission, and the lymphocyte percentage continued to decrease during hospitalization (7.10 [4.45, 12.73]% vs. 2.91 [1.79, 6.13]%, Z = 5.242, P < 0.001). Alanine transaminase (22.00 [15.00, 34.00] vs. 18.70 [13.00, 30.38] U/L, Z = 2.592, P = 0.010), aspartate transaminase (34.00 [27.00, 47.00] vs. 22.00 [17.65, 31.75] U/L, Z = 7.308, P < 0.001), and creatinine levels (89.00 [72.00, 133.50] vs. 65.00 [54.60, 78.75] µmol/L, Z = 6.478, P < 0.001) were significantly higher in the death group than those in the recovered group. C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were also significantly higher in the death group on admission (109.25 [35.00, 170.28] vs. 3.22 [1.04, 21.80] mg/L, Z = 10.206, P < 0.001) and showed no significant improvement after treatment (109.25 [35.00, 170.28] vs. 81.60 [27.23, 179.08] mg/L, Z = 1.219, P = 0.233). The patients in the death group had more complications such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) (89.9% vs. 8.6%, χ = 148.105, P < 0.001), acute cardiac injury (59.6% vs. 0.9%, χ = 93.222, P < 0.001), acute kidney injury (18.3% vs. 0%, χ = 23.257, P < 0.001), shock (11.9% vs. 0%, χ = 14.618, P < 0.001), and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) (6.4% vs. 0%, χ = 7.655, P = 0.006). CONCLUSIONS: Compared to the recovered group, more patients in the death group exhibited characteristics of advanced age, pre-existing comorbidities, dyspnea, oxygen saturation decrease, increased WBC count, decreased lymphocytes, and elevated CRP levels. More patients in the death group had complications such as ARDS, acute cardiac injury, acute kidney injury, shock, and DIC.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Oxygen/blood , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Viruses ; 14(2)2022 01 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1667345

ABSTRACT

This study compared the immunogenicity of inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccines between people living with HIV (PLWH) and HIV-negative individuals. We recruited 120 PLWH and 53 HIV-negative individuals aged 18-59 years who had received an inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine in two Chinese cities between April and June 2021. Blood samples were tested for immunogenicity of the inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccines. The prevalence and severity of adverse events associated with SARS-CoV-2 vaccines were similar between PLWH and HIV-negative individuals. The seropositivity of neutralizing activity against authentic SARS-CoV-2, of the total amount of antibody (total antibody) and of S-IgG were 71.3%, 81.9%, and 92.6%, respectively, among fully vaccinated PLWH. Among all participants, PLWH had lower neutralizing activity, total antibody, S-IgG, and T-cell-specific immune response levels, compared to HIV-negative individuals, after controlling for types of vaccine, time interval between first and second dose, time after receiving the second dose, and sociodemographic factors. PLWH with a longer interval since HIV diagnosis, who received their second dose 15-28 days prior to study commencement, and who had an interval of ≥21 days between first and second dose had higher neutralizing activity levels. The immunogenicity of the inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccines was lower among PLWH as compared to HIV-negative individuals. Vaccination guideline specific for PLWH should be developed.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , HIV Infections/complications , HIV Infections/immunology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Vaccination , Vaccines, Inactivated/administration & dosage , Young Adult
17.
Eur J Psychotraumatol ; 13(1): 2019980, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1665830

ABSTRACT

Background: As a highly infectious disease with human-to-human transmission characteristics, COVID-19 has caused panic in the general public. Those who have recovered from COVID-19 may experience discrimination and internalized stigma. They may be more likely to worry about social interaction and develop social anxiety. Objectives: This study investigated the associations among hospitalization factors, social/interpersonal factors, personal factors, and social anxiety to reveal the mechanism of social anxiety in COVID-19 survivors. Methods: A cross-sectional, multicenter telephone survey was conducted from July to September 2020 in five Chinese cities (i.e. Wuhan, Nanning, Shenzhen, Zhuhai, and Dongguan); adult COVID-19 survivors were recruited 6 months after they were discharged from the hospital. Linear regressions and path analysis based on the minority stress model were conducted to test the relationships among hospitalization, social/interpersonal factors, personal factors, and social anxiety. Results: The response rate was 74.5% (N = 199, 55.3% females). Linear regression analyses showed that various hospitalization, social/interpersonal, and personal factors were statistically significantly associated with social anxiety. Path analysis showed that the proposed model fit the data well (χ2(df) = 3.196(3), p = .362, CFI = .999, NNFI = .996, RMSEA = .018). Internalized stigma fully mediated the association between perceived discrimination/social support and social anxiety, while it partially mediated the association between perceived affiliate stigma and social anxiety. Conclusions: The results suggest that social/interpersonal and personal factors have a stronger association with social anxiety than hospitalization factors and highlight the importance of internalized stigma in understanding the mechanisms of these relationships. Clinical psychologists can refer to these modifiable psychosocial factors to develop efficient interventions for mental health promotion.


Antecedentes: Como una enfermedad altamente infecciosa con características de transmisión de persona a persona, el COVID-19 ha causado pánico en el público en general. Aquellos que se han recuperado del COVID-19 pueden experimentar discriminación y estigma internalizado. Es más probable que se preocupen por la interacción social y desarrollen ansiedad social.Objetivos: Este estudio investigó las asociaciones entre factores de hospitalización, factores sociales /interpersonales, factores personales y ansiedad social para revelar el mecanismo de ansiedad social en sobrevivientes de COVID-19.Métodos: Se realizó una encuesta telefónica transversal multicentro de julio a septiembre de 2020 en cinco ciudades chinas (es decir, Wuhan, Nanning, Shenzhen, Zhuhai y Dongguan). Se reclutaron sobrevivientes adultos de COVID-19 seis meses después de ser dados de alta del hospital. Se realizaron regresiones lineales y análisis de ruta basados en el modelo de estrés de minoría para probar las relaciones entre la hospitalización, los factores sociales/interpersonales, los factores personales y la ansiedad social.Resultados: La tasa de respuesta fue del 74,5% (N = 199, 55,3% mujeres). Los análisis de regresión lineal mostraron que varios factores de hospitalización, sociales/interpersonales y personales se asociaron de manera estadísticamente significativa con la ansiedad social. El análisis de ruta mostró que el modelo propuesto se ajustaba bien a los datos (χ 2 (df) = 3.196 (3), p = .362, CFI = .999, NNFI = .996, RMSEA = .018). El estigma internalizado medió completamente la asociación entre discriminación/apoyo social percibido y ansiedad social, mientras que medió parcialmente la asociación entre el estigma percibido de afiliados y ansiedad social.Conclusiones: Los resultados sugieren que los factores sociales/interpersonales y personales tienen una asociación más fuerte con la ansiedad social que los factores de hospitalización y resaltan la importancia del estigma internalizado en la comprensión de los mecanismos de estas relaciones. Los psicólogos clínicos pueden referirse a estos factores psicosociales modificables para desarrollar intervenciones eficientes para la promoción de la salud mental.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Hospitalization , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , China , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fear , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Stigma , Social Support , Surveys and Questionnaires , Survivors , Young Adult
18.
European Journal of Psychotraumatology ; 13(1), 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1661180

ABSTRACT

Background As a highly infectious disease with human-to-human transmission characteristics, COVID-19 has caused panic in the general public. Those who have recovered from COVID-19 may experience discrimination and internalized stigma. They may be more likely to worry about social interaction and develop social anxiety. Objectives This study investigated the associations among hospitalization factors, social/interpersonal factors, personal factors, and social anxiety to reveal the mechanism of social anxiety in COVID-19 survivors. Methods A cross-sectional, multicenter telephone survey was conducted from July to September 2020 in five Chinese cities (i.e. Wuhan, Nanning, Shenzhen, Zhuhai, and Dongguan);adult COVID-19 survivors were recruited 6 months after they were discharged from the hospital. Linear regressions and path analysis based on the minority stress model were conducted to test the relationships among hospitalization, social/interpersonal factors, personal factors, and social anxiety. Results The response rate was 74.5% (N = 199, 55.3% females). Linear regression analyses showed that various hospitalization, social/interpersonal, and personal factors were statistically significantly associated with social anxiety. Path analysis showed that the proposed model fit the data well (χ2(df) = 3.196(3), p = .362, CFI = .999, NNFI = .996, RMSEA = .018). Internalized stigma fully mediated the association between perceived discrimination/social support and social anxiety, while it partially mediated the association between perceived affiliate stigma and social anxiety. Conclusions The results suggest that social/interpersonal and personal factors have a stronger association with social anxiety than hospitalization factors and highlight the importance of internalized stigma in understanding the mechanisms of these relationships. Clinical psychologists can refer to these modifiable psychosocial factors to develop efficient interventions for mental health promotion. HIGHLIGHTS Internalized stigma fully mediated the effects of perceived discrimination and social support on social anxiety and partially mediated the effect of perceived affiliate stigma on social anxiety.

19.
Front Psychiatry ; 12: 773106, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1643547

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 survivors who had acute respiratory symptoms might experience prolonged post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) due to further rehabilitation, somatic symptoms and related distress. The conservation of resource (COR) theory is a well-developed theory to understand how people develop PTSD symptoms in traumatic events. The current study aimed to examine the potential factors of PTSD symptoms and interrelationships among this factors among COVID-19 survivors based on the COR theory. This cross-sectional telephone survey enrolled 199 COVID-19 patients (Mean age = 42.7; 53.3% females) 6 months after their hospital discharge in five Chinese cities (i.e., Wuhan, Shenzhen, Zhuhai, Dongguan, and Nanning). The results showed that 7% of participants were classified as having probable PTSD. The significant potential factors relating to PTSD symptoms included socio-demographic status, hospitalization experiences, post-hospitalization experiences, and psychological status. Besides, the proposed statistical mediation model based on the COR framework showed good model fit, χ2(df) = 17.286 (5), p = 0.004, CFI = 0.962, NNFI = 0.951, RMSEA = 0.077. Perceived resource loss/gain fully mediated the association between exposure to other patients' suffering during hospitalization and PTSD symptoms, and partially mediated the relationships from somatic symptoms/perceived impact of being infected with COVID-19 after discharge to PTSD symptoms. On the other hand, resilience was a full mediator in the relationship from ICU experience to PTSD symptoms and a partial mediator in the relationship from perceived impact to PTSD symptoms. The results provide preliminary support on applying the COR theory to understand the factors of PTSD symptoms among COVID-19 survivors. Interventions to reduce PTSD symptoms in this population can be developed based on the modifiable psychosocial mediators.

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