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1.
Sci Transl Med ; 14(655): eabn3715, 2022 07 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1962064

ABSTRACT

Several variants of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) have emerged during the current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Although antibody cross-reactivity with the spike glycoproteins (S) of diverse coronaviruses, including endemic common cold coronaviruses (HCoVs), has been documented, it remains unclear whether such antibody responses, typically targeting the conserved S2 subunit, contribute to protection when induced by infection or through vaccination. Using a mouse model, we found that prior HCoV-OC43 S-targeted immunity primes neutralizing antibody responses to otherwise subimmunogenic SARS-CoV-2 S exposure and promotes S2-targeting antibody responses. Moreover, vaccination with SARS-CoV-2 S2 elicited antibodies in mice that neutralized diverse animal and human alphacoronaviruses and betacoronaviruses in vitro and provided a degree of protection against SARS-CoV-2 challenge in vivo. Last, in mice with a history of SARS-CoV-2 Wuhan-based S vaccination, further S2 vaccination induced broader neutralizing antibody response than booster Wuhan S vaccination, suggesting that it may prevent repertoire focusing caused by repeated homologous vaccination. These data establish the protective value of an S2-targeting vaccine and support the notion that S2 vaccination may better prepare the immune system to respond to the changing nature of the S1 subunit in SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern, as well as to future coronavirus zoonoses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Coronavirus OC43, Human , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/immunology , Humans , Mice , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccination
2.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-293390

ABSTRACT

Several common-cold coronaviruses (HCoVs) are endemic in humans and several variants of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) have emerged during the current Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Whilst antibody cross-reactivity with the Spike glycoproteins (S) of diverse coronaviruses has been documented, it remains unclear whether such antibody responses, typically targeting the conserved S2 subunit, contribute to or mediate protection, when induced naturally or through vaccination. Using a mouse model, we show that prior HCoV-OC43 S immunity primes neutralising antibody responses to otherwise subimmunogenic SARS-CoV-2 S exposure and promotes S2-targeting antibody responses. Moreover, mouse vaccination with SARS-CoV-2 S2 elicits antibodies that neutralise diverse animal and human alphacoronaviruses and betacoronaviruses in vitro, and protects against SARS-CoV-2 challenge in vivo. Lastly, in mice with a history of SARS-CoV-2 Wuhan-based S vaccination, further S2 vaccination induces stronger and broader neutralising antibody response than booster Wuhan S vaccination, suggesting it may prevent repertoire focusing caused by repeated homologous vaccination. The data presented here establish the protective value of an S2-targeting vaccine and support the notion that S2 vaccination may better prepare the immune system to respond to the changing nature of the S1 subunit in SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern (VOCs), as well as to unpredictable, yet inevitable future coronavirus zoonoses.

3.
Semin Immunol ; 55: 101507, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1492624

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses are evolutionarily successful RNA viruses, common to multiple avian, amphibian and mammalian hosts. Despite their ubiquity and potential impact, knowledge of host immunity to coronaviruses remains incomplete, partly owing to the lack of overt pathogenicity of endemic human coronaviruses (HCoVs), which typically cause common colds. However, the need for deeper understanding became pressing with the zoonotic introduction of three novel coronaviruses in the past two decades, causing severe acute respiratory syndromes in humans, and the unfolding pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). This renewed interest not only triggered the discovery of two of the four HCoVs, but also uncovered substantial cellular and humoral cross-reactivity with shared or related coronaviral antigens. Here, we review the evidence for cross-reactive B cell memory elicited by HCoVs and its potential impact on the puzzlingly variable outcome of SARS-CoV-2 infection. The available data indicate targeting of highly conserved regions primarily in the S2 subunits of the spike glycoproteins of HCoVs and SARS-CoV-2 by cross-reactive B cells and antibodies. Rare monoclonal antibodies reactive with conserved S2 epitopes and with potent virus neutralising activity have been cloned, underscoring the potential functional relevance of cross-reactivity. We discuss B cell and antibody cross-reactivity in the broader context of heterologous humoral immunity to coronaviruses, as well as the limits of protective immune memory against homologous re-infection. Given the bidirectional nature of cross-reactivity, the unprecedented current vaccination campaign against SARS-CoV-2 is expected to impact HCoVs, as well as future zoonotic coronaviruses attempting to cross the species barrier. However, emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants with resistance to neutralisation by vaccine-induced antibodies highlight a need for targeting more constrained, less mutable parts of the spike. The delineation of such cross-reactive areas, which humoral immunity can be trained to attack, may offer the key to permanently shifting the balance of our interaction with current and future coronaviruses in our favour.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Animals , Antibodies, Viral , Humans , Immunity, Humoral
4.
Med (N Y) ; 2(9): 1093-1109.e6, 2021 09 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1404795

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Differences in humoral immunity to coronaviruses, including severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), between children and adults remain unexplained, and the effect of underlying immune dysfunction or suppression is unknown. Here, we sought to examine the antibody immune competence of children and adolescents with prevalent inflammatory rheumatic diseases, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM), and juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE) against the seasonal human coronavirus (HCoV)-OC43 that frequently infects this age group. METHODS: Sera were collected from JIA (n = 118), JDM (n = 49), and JSLE (n = 30) patients and from healthy control (n = 54) children and adolescents prior to the coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) pandemic. We used sensitive flow-cytometry-based assays to determine titers of antibodies that reacted with the spike and nucleoprotein of HCoV-OC43 and cross-reacted with the spike and nucleoprotein of SARS-CoV-2, and we compared them with respective titers in sera from patients with multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children and adolescents (MIS-C). FINDINGS: Despite immune dysfunction and immunosuppressive treatment, JIA, JDM, and JSLE patients maintained comparable or stronger humoral responses than healthier peers, which was dominated by immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to HCoV-OC43 spike, and harbored IgG antibodies that cross-reacted with SARS-CoV-2 spike. In contrast, responses to HCoV-OC43 and SARS-CoV-2 nucleoproteins exhibited delayed age-dependent class-switching and were not elevated in JIA, JDM, and JSLE patients, which argues against increased exposure. CONCLUSIONS: Consequently, autoimmune rheumatic diseases and their treatment were associated with a favorable ratio of spike to nucleoprotein antibodies. FUNDING: This work was supported by a Centre of Excellence Centre for Adolescent Rheumatology Versus Arthritis grant, 21593, UKRI funding reference MR/R013926/1, the Great Ormond Street Children's Charity, Cure JM Foundation, Myositis UK, Lupus UK, and the NIHR Biomedical Research Centres at GOSH and UCLH. This work was supported by the Francis Crick Institute, which receives its core funding from Cancer Research UK, the UK Medical Research Council, and the Wellcome Trust.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases , COVID-19 , Coronavirus OC43, Human , Rheumatic Diseases , Adolescent , Adult , Antibodies, Viral , Antibody Formation , COVID-19/complications , Child , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , Nucleoproteins , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome
5.
Elife ; 102021 07 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1332333

ABSTRACT

Background: The degree of heterotypic immunity induced by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) strains is a major determinant of the spread of emerging variants and the success of vaccination campaigns, but remains incompletely understood. Methods: We examined the immunogenicity of SARS-CoV-2 variant B.1.1.7 (Alpha) that arose in the United Kingdom and spread globally. We determined titres of spike glycoprotein-binding antibodies and authentic virus neutralising antibodies induced by B.1.1.7 infection to infer homotypic and heterotypic immunity. Results: Antibodies elicited by B.1.1.7 infection exhibited significantly reduced recognition and neutralisation of parental strains or of the South Africa variant B.1.351 (Beta) than of the infecting variant. The drop in cross-reactivity was significantly more pronounced following B.1.1.7 than parental strain infection. Conclusions: The results indicate that heterotypic immunity induced by SARS-CoV-2 variants is asymmetric. Funding: This work was supported by the Francis Crick Institute and the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems, Magdeburg.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross Reactions , Humans , Parents , South Africa/epidemiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , United Kingdom/epidemiology
6.
Science ; 370(6522): 1339-1343, 2020 12 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-913669

ABSTRACT

Zoonotic introduction of novel coronaviruses may encounter preexisting immunity in humans. Using diverse assays for antibodies recognizing SARS-CoV-2 proteins, we detected preexisting humoral immunity. SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein (S)-reactive antibodies were detectable using a flow cytometry-based method in SARS-CoV-2-uninfected individuals and were particularly prevalent in children and adolescents. They were predominantly of the immunoglobulin G (IgG) class and targeted the S2 subunit. By contrast, SARS-CoV-2 infection induced higher titers of SARS-CoV-2 S-reactive IgG antibodies targeting both the S1 and S2 subunits, and concomitant IgM and IgA antibodies, lasting throughout the observation period. SARS-CoV-2-uninfected donor sera exhibited specific neutralizing activity against SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV-2 S pseudotypes. Distinguishing preexisting and de novo immunity will be critical for our understanding of susceptibility to and the natural course of SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Humoral , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Amino Acid Sequence , Animals , COVID-19/blood , Epitope Mapping , Female , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immunoglobulin A/blood , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Viral Zoonoses/blood , Viral Zoonoses/immunology , Young Adult
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