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1.
Archives of cardiovascular diseases ; 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1728219

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronary artery calcium (CAC) is an independent risk factor for major adverse cardiovascular events;however, its impact on coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) mortality remains unclear, especially in patients without known atheromatous disease. Aims: To evaluate the association between CAC visual score and 6-month mortality in patients without history of atheromatous disease hospitalized with COVID-19 pneumonia. Methods: A single-centre observational cohort study was conducted, involving 293 consecutive patients with COVID-19 in Paris, France, between 13 March and 30 April 2020, with a 6-month follow-up. Patients with a history of ischaemic stroke or coronary or peripheral artery disease were excluded. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality at 6 months according to CAC score, which was assessed by analysing images obtained after the first routine non-electrocardiogram-gated computed tomography scan performed to detect COVID-19 pneumonia. Results: A total of 251 patients (mean age 64.8 ± 16.7 years) were included in the analysis. Fifty-one patients (20.3%) died within 6 months. The mortality rate increased with the magnitude of calcifications, and was 10/101 (9.9%), 15/66 (22.7%), 10/34 (29.4%) and 16/50 (32.0%) for the no CAC, mild CAC, moderate CAC and heavy CAC groups, respectively (P = 0.004). Compared with the no calcification group, adjusted risk of death increased progressively with CAC: hazard ratio (HR) 2.37 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.06–5.27), HR 3.1 (95% CI 1.29–7.45) and HR 4.02 (95% CI 1.82–8.88) in the mild, moderate and heavy CAC groups, respectively. Conclusions: Non-electrocardiogram-gated computed tomography during the initial pulmonary assessment of patients with COVID-19 without atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease showed a high prevalence of mild, moderate and heavy CAC. CAC score was related to 6-month mortality, independent of conventional cardiovascular risk factors. These results highlight the importance of CAC scoring for patients hospitalized with COVID-19, and calls for attention to patients with high CAC.

2.
Arch Cardiovasc Dis ; 2022 Mar 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1719146

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronary artery calcium (CAC) is an independent risk factor for major adverse cardiovascular events; however, its impact on coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) mortality remains unclear, especially in patients without known atheromatous disease. AIMS: To evaluate the association between CAC visual score and 6-month mortality in patients without history of atheromatous disease hospitalized with COVID-19 pneumonia. METHODS: A single-centre observational cohort study was conducted, involving 293 consecutive patients with COVID-19 in Paris, France, between 13 March and 30 April 2020, with a 6-month follow-up. Patients with a history of ischaemic stroke or coronary or peripheral artery disease were excluded. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality at 6 months according to CAC score, which was assessed by analysing images obtained after the first routine non-electrocardiogram-gated computed tomography scan performed to detect COVID-19 pneumonia. RESULTS: A total of 251 patients (mean age 64.8±16.7 years) were included in the analysis. Fifty-one patients (20.3%) died within 6 months. The mortality rate increased with the magnitude of calcifications, and was 10/101 (9.9%), 15/66 (22.7%), 10/34 (29.4%) and 16/50 (32.0%) for the no CAC, mild CAC, moderate CAC and heavy CAC groups, respectively (p=0.004). Compared with the no calcification group, adjusted risk of death increased progressively with CAC: hazard ratio (HR) 2.37 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.06-5.27), HR 3.1 (95% CI 1.29-7.45) and HR 4.02 (95% CI 1.82-8.88) in the mild, moderate and heavy CAC groups, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Non-electrocardiogram-gated computed tomography during the initial pulmonary assessment of patients with COVID-19 without atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease showed a high prevalence of mild, moderate and heavy CAC. CAC score was related to 6-month mortality, independent of conventional cardiovascular risk factors. These results highlight the importance of CAC scoring for patients hospitalized with COVID-19, and calls for attention to patients with high CAC.

3.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-306787

ABSTRACT

Background: SARS-CoV-2 induces a humoral response with seroconversion occurring within the first weeks after COVID-19 disease. Those antibodies exert a neutralizing activity against SARS-CoV-2, whose evolution overtime after COVID-19 is however unknown.Methods: In this monocentric prospective study, sera of 107 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 were collected at 3 months and 6 months post-infection. We performed quantitative neutralization experiments on top of high-throughput serological assays evaluating anti-Spike (S) and anti-Nucleocapsid (NP) IgG.Findings: Levels of sero-neutralization decreased significantly over study time, as well as IgG rates. After 6 months, 2.8% of the patients had a negative serological status for both anti-S and anti-NP IgG. However, all sera had a persistent and effective neutralizing effect on SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing assays. IgG levels correlated with sero-neutralization and this correlation was stronger for anti-S than for anti-NP antibodies. The level of sero-neutralization quantified at 6 months correlated with markers of initial severity, notably admission in intensive care units and the need for mechanical invasive ventilation.Interpretation: Decrease of IgG rates and serological assays becoming negative did not imply loss of neutralizing capacity in our patients. Those results are encouraging and in favor of sustained humoral response for at least 6 months in patients previously hospitalized for COVID-19, which will have to be considered in global deployment of vaccination strategy.Trial Registration: The French Covid cohort (NCT04262921)Funding Statement: The French COVID cohort is funding by the REACTing (REsearch & ACtion emergING infectious diseases) consortium and by a grant of the French Ministry of Health (PHRC n°20-0424).Outside the submitted work, JSH is supported by AP-HP, INSERM, the French National Research Agency (NADHeart ANR-17-CE17-0015-02, PACIFIC ANR-18-CE14-0032-01, CORRECT_LMNA ANR-19-CE17-0013-02), the ERA-Net-CVD (ANR-16-ECVD-0011-03, Clarify project), Fédération Française de Cardiologie, the Fondation pour la Recherche Médicale, and by a grant from the Leducq Foundation (18CVD05), and is coordinating a French PIA Project (2018-PSPC-07, PACIFIC-preserved, BPIFrance) and a University Research Federation against heart failure (FHU2019, PREVENT_Heart Failure). JG reports personal fees from ViiV Healthcare, Gilead Science, Janssen Cilag, and research grants from Gilead Sciences, MSD and ViiV Healthcare, outside the submitted work.Declaration of Interests: Authors have nothing to disclose. There are no relationships with industry.Ethics Approval Statement: The French Covid cohort (NCT04262921) is a prospective multi-center observational cohort sponsored by Inserm which was authorized by the French Ethics Committee CPP Ile-de-France VI (ID RCB:2020-A00256-33).

4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(21)2021 Oct 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480767

ABSTRACT

Evaluating the use and impact of telemedicine in nursing homes is necessary to promote improvements in the quality of this practice. Even though challenges and opportunities of telemedicine are increasingly becoming well documented for geriatrics (such as improving access to healthcare, patient management, and education while reducing costs), there is still limited knowledge on how to better implement it in an inter-organizational context, especially when considering nursing homes. In this regard, this study aimed first to describe the telemedicine activity of nursing homes when cooperating with a general hospital; and then understand the behavioral differences amongst nursing homes while identifying critical factors when implementing a telemedicine project. We conducted a sequential, explanatory mixed-method study using quantitative then qualitative methods to better understand the results. Three years of teleconsultation data of twenty-six nursing homes (15 rural and 11 urban) conducting teleconsultations with a general hospital (Troyes Hospital, France) were included for the quantitative analysis, and eleven telemedicine project managers for the qualitative analysis. Between April 2018 and April 2021, 590 teleconsultations were conducted: 45% (n = 265) were conducted for general practice, 29% (n = 172) for wound care, 11% (n = 62) for diabetes management, 8% (n = 47) with gerontologist and 6% (n = 38) for dermatology. Rural nursing homes conducted more teleconsultations overall than urban ones (RR: 2.484; 95% CI: 1.083 to 5.518; p = 0.03) and included more teleconsultations for general practice (RR: 16.305; 95% CI: 3.505 to 73.523; p = 0.001). Our qualitative study showed that three critical factors are required for the implementation of a telemedicine project in nursing homes: (1) the motivation to perform teleconsultations (in other words, improving access to care and cooperation between professionals); (2) building a relevant telemedicine medical offer based on patients' and treating physicians' needs; and (3) it's specific organization in terms of time and space. Our study showed different uses of teleconsultations according to the rural or urban localization of nursing homes and that telemedicine projects should be designed to consider this aspect. Triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic, telemedicine projects in nursing homes are increasing, and observing the three critical factors presented above could be necessary to limit the failure of such projects.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Hospitals, General , Humans , Nursing Homes , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
5.
J Clin Med ; 10(19)2021 Oct 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463727

ABSTRACT

We aimed to compare the influence of cardiometabolic disorders on the incidence of severe COVID-19 vs. non-COVID pneumonia. We included all consecutive patients admitted with SARS-CoV-2-positive pneumonia between 12 March 2020 and 1 April 2020 and compared them to patients with influenza pneumonia hospitalized between December 2017 and December 2019 at the same tertiary hospital in Paris. Patients with COVID-19 were significantly younger and more frequently male. In the analysis adjusted for age and sex, patients with COVID-19 were more likely to be obese (adjOR: 2.25; 95% CI 1.24-4.09; p = 0.0076) and receive diuretics (adjOR: 2.13; 95% CI 1.12-4.03; p = 0.021) but were less likely to be smokers (adjOR: 0.40; 95% CI 0.24-0.64; p = 0.0002), have COPD (adjOR: 0.25; 95% CI 0.11-0.56; p = 0.0008), or have a previous or active cancer diagnosis (adjOR: 0.54, 95% CI 0.32-0.91; p = 0.020). The rate of ICU admission was significantly higher in patients with COVID-19 (32.4% vs. 5.2% p < 0.0001). Obesity was significantly associated with the risk of direct ICU admission in patients with COVID-19 but not in patients with influenza pneumonia. Likewise, pre-existing hypertension was significantly associated with mortality in patients with COVID-19 but not in patients with influenza pneumonia. Cardiometabolic disorders differentially influenced the risk of presenting with severe COVID-19 or influenza pneumonia.

6.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(6): e1337-e1344, 2021 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1411827

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Humoral response to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) occurs within the first weeks after coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Those antibodies exert a neutralizing activity against SARS-CoV-2, whose evolution over time after COVID-19 as well as efficiency against novel variants are poorly characterized. METHODS: In this prospective study, sera of 107 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 were collected at 3 and 6 months postinfection. We performed quantitative neutralization experiments on top of high-throughput serological assays evaluating anti-spike (S) and anti-nucleocapsid (NP) immunoglobulin G (IgG). RESULTS: Levels of seroneutralization and IgG rates against the ancestral strain decreased significantly over time. After 6 months, 2.8% of the patients had a negative serological status for both anti-S and anti-NP IgG. However, all sera had a persistent and effective neutralizing effect against SARS-CoV-2. IgG levels correlated with seroneutralization, and this correlation was stronger for anti-S than for anti-NP antibodies. The level of seroneutralization quantified at 6 months correlated with markers of initial severity, notably admission to intensive care units and the need for mechanical invasive ventilation. In addition, sera collected at 6 months were tested against multiple SARS-CoV-2 variants and showed efficient neutralizing effects against the D614G, B.1.1.7, and P.1 variants but significantly weaker activity against the B.1.351 variant. CONCLUSIONS: Decrease in IgG rates and serological assays becoming negative did not imply loss of neutralizing capacity. Our results indicate a sustained humoral response against the ancestral strain and the D614G, B.1.1.7, and P.1 variants for at least 6 months in patients previously hospitalized for COVID-19. A weaker protection was, however, observed for the B.1.351 variant.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , Hospitalization , Humans , Prospective Studies , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
7.
Front Immunol ; 12: 701273, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1332121

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection leads to a highly variable clinical evolution, ranging from asymptomatic to severe disease with acute respiratory distress syndrome, requiring intensive care units (ICU) admission. The optimal management of hospitalized patients has become a worldwide concern and identification of immune biomarkers predictive of the clinical outcome for hospitalized patients remains a major challenge. Immunophenotyping and transcriptomic analysis of hospitalized COVID-19 patients at admission allow identifying the two categories of patients. Inflammation, high neutrophil activation, dysfunctional monocytic response and a strongly impaired adaptive immune response was observed in patients who will experience the more severe form of the disease. This observation was validated in an independent cohort of patients. Using in silico analysis on drug signature database, we identify differential therapeutics that specifically correspond to each group of patients. From this signature, we propose a score-the SARS-Score-composed of easily quantifiable biomarkers, to classify hospitalized patients upon arrival to adapt treatment according to their immune profile.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Adaptive Immunity/genetics , Adult , Aged , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Biomarkers , COVID-19/therapy , Cohort Studies , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Inflammation/genetics , Male , Middle Aged , Precision Medicine , Prospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index , Transcriptome
8.
Diagn Interv Imaging ; 102(12): 717-725, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1306922

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between coronary artery calcium (CAC) visual score and 6-month mortality in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). MATERIAL AND METHODS: A single-center prospective observational cohort was conducted in 169 COVID-19 consecutive hospitalized patients between March 13 and April 1, 2020, and follow-up for 6-months. A four-level visual CAC scoring was assessed by analyzing images obtained after the first routine non-ECG-gated CT performed to detect COVID-19 pneumonia. RESULTS: Among 169 confirmed COVID-19 patients (118 men, 51 women; mean age, 65.6 ± 18.8 [SD] years; age range: 30-95 years) 63 (37%) presented with either moderate (n = 26, 15.3%) or heavy (n = 37, 21.8%) CAC detected by CT and 20 (11.8%) had history of cardiovascular disease requiring specific preventive treatment. At six months, mortality rate (45/169; 26.6%) increased with magnitude of CAC and was 7/64 (10.9%), 11/42 (26.2%), 10/26 (38.5%), 17/37 (45.9%) for no-CAC, mild-CAC, moderate-CAC and heavy-CAC groups, respectively (P = 0.001). Compared to the no CAC group, risk of death increased after adjustment with magnitude of CAC (HR: 2.23, 95% CI: 0.73-6.87, P = 0.16; HR: 2.78, 95% CI: 0.85-9.07, P0.09; HR: 5.38, 95% CI: 1.57-18.40, P = 0.007; in mild CAC, moderate and heavy CAC groups, respectively). In patients without previous coronary artery disease (154/169; 91%), mortality increased from 10.9% to 45.8% (P = 0.001) according to the magnitude of CAC categories. After adjustment, presence of moderate or heavy CAC was associated with higher mortality (HR: 2.26, 95% CI: 1.09-4.69, P = 0.03). CONCLUSION: By using non-ECG-gated CT during the initial pulmonary assessment of COVID-19, heavy CAC is independently associated with 6-month mortality in patients hospitalized for severe COVID-19 pneumonia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronary Artery Disease , Vascular Calcification , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Coronary Angiography , Coronary Artery Disease/diagnostic imaging , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Predictive Value of Tests , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Vascular Calcification/diagnostic imaging
9.
PLoS One ; 16(5): e0252026, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1243847

ABSTRACT

To investigate the mechanisms underlying the SARS-CoV-2 infection severity observed in patients with obesity, we performed a prospective study of 51 patients evaluating the impact of multiple immune parameters during 2 weeks after admission, on vital organs' functions according to body mass index (BMI) categories. High-dimensional flow cytometric characterization of immune cell subsets was performed at admission, 30 systemic cytokines/chemokines levels were sequentially measured, thirteen endothelial markers were determined at admission and at the zenith of the cytokines. Computed tomography scans on admission were quantified for lung damage and hepatic steatosis (n = 23). Abnormal BMI (> 25) observed in 72.6% of patients, was associated with a higher rate of intensive care unit hospitalization (p = 0.044). SARS-CoV-2 RNAaemia, peripheral immune cell subsets and cytokines/chemokines were similar among BMI groups. A significant association between inflammatory cytokines and liver, renal, and endothelial dysfunctions was observed only in patients with obesity (BMI > 30). In contrast, early signs of lung damage (ground-glass opacity) correlated with Th1/M1/inflammatory cytokines only in normal weight patients. Later lesions of pulmonary consolidation correlated with BMI but were independent of cytokine levels. Our study reveals distinct physiopathological mechanisms associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection in patients with obesity that may have important clinical implications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Cytokines/metabolism , Liver/physiopathology , Lung/physiopathology , Obesity/pathology , Aged , Biomarkers/metabolism , Body Mass Index , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Chemokines/blood , Chemokines/metabolism , Cytokines/blood , Endothelium, Vascular/metabolism , Endothelium, Vascular/physiopathology , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Liver/diagnostic imaging , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity/complications , Prospective Studies , RNA, Viral/blood , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index
10.
Eur Radiol ; 31(11): 8354-8363, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1206866

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Chest CT has been widely used to screen and to evaluate the severity of COVID-19 disease in the early stages of infection without severe acute respiratory syndrome, but no prospective data are available to study the relationship between extent of lung damage and short-term mortality. The objective was to evaluate association between standardized simple visual lung damage CT score (vldCTs) at admission, which does not require any software, and 30-day mortality. METHODS: In a single-center prospective cohort of COVID-19 patients included during 4 weeks, the presence and extent of ground glass opacities(GGO), consolidation opacities, or both of them were visually assessed in each of the 5 lung lobes (score from 0 to 4 per lobe depending on the percentage and out of 20 per patient = vldCTs) after the first chest CT performed to detect COVID-19 pneumonia. RESULTS: Among 210 confirmed COVID-19 patients, the number of survivors and non-survivors was 162 (77%) and 48 (23%), respectively at 30 days. vldCTs was significantly higher in non-survivors, and the AUC of vldCTs to distinguish survivors and non-survivors was 0.72 (95%CI 0.628-0.807, p < 0.001); the best cut-off vldCTs value was 7. During follow-up, significant differences in discharges and 30-day mortality were observed between patients with vldCTs ≥ 7 versus vldCTs < 7: (98 [85.2%] vs 49 [51.6%]; p < 0.001 and 36 [37.9%] vs 12 [12.4%]; p < 0.001, respectively. The 30-day mortality increased if vldCTs ≥ 7 (HR, 3.16 (1.50-6.43); p = 0.001), independent of age, respiratory rate and oxygen saturation levels, and comorbidities at admission. CONCLUSIONS: By using chest CT in COVID-19 patients, extensive lung damage can be visually assessed with a score related to 30-day mortality independent of conventional risk factors of the disease. KEY POINTS: • In non-selected COVID-19 patients included prospectively during 4 weeks, the extent of ground glass opacities(GGO) and consolidation opacities evaluated by a simple visual score was related to 30-day mortality independent of age, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation levels, comorbidities, and hs-troponin I level at admission. • This severity score should be incorporated into risk stratification algorithms and in structured chest CT reports requiring a standardized reading by radiologists in case of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospitals , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
11.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(6): e1337-e1344, 2021 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1182995

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Humoral response to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) occurs within the first weeks after coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Those antibodies exert a neutralizing activity against SARS-CoV-2, whose evolution over time after COVID-19 as well as efficiency against novel variants are poorly characterized. METHODS: In this prospective study, sera of 107 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 were collected at 3 and 6 months postinfection. We performed quantitative neutralization experiments on top of high-throughput serological assays evaluating anti-spike (S) and anti-nucleocapsid (NP) immunoglobulin G (IgG). RESULTS: Levels of seroneutralization and IgG rates against the ancestral strain decreased significantly over time. After 6 months, 2.8% of the patients had a negative serological status for both anti-S and anti-NP IgG. However, all sera had a persistent and effective neutralizing effect against SARS-CoV-2. IgG levels correlated with seroneutralization, and this correlation was stronger for anti-S than for anti-NP antibodies. The level of seroneutralization quantified at 6 months correlated with markers of initial severity, notably admission to intensive care units and the need for mechanical invasive ventilation. In addition, sera collected at 6 months were tested against multiple SARS-CoV-2 variants and showed efficient neutralizing effects against the D614G, B.1.1.7, and P.1 variants but significantly weaker activity against the B.1.351 variant. CONCLUSIONS: Decrease in IgG rates and serological assays becoming negative did not imply loss of neutralizing capacity. Our results indicate a sustained humoral response against the ancestral strain and the D614G, B.1.1.7, and P.1 variants for at least 6 months in patients previously hospitalized for COVID-19. A weaker protection was, however, observed for the B.1.351 variant.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , Hospitalization , Humans , Prospective Studies , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
12.
ESC Heart Fail ; 8(3): 2232-2239, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1151893

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Myocardial injury is frequently observed in patients hospitalized with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia. Different cardiac abnormalities have been reported during the acute COVID-19 phase, ranging from infra-clinic elevations of myocardial necrosis biomarkers to acute cardiac dysfunction and myocarditis. There is limited information on late cardiac sequelae in patients who have recovered from acute COVID-19 illness. We aimed to document the presence and quantify the extent of myocardial functional alterations in patients hospitalized 6 months earlier for COVID-19 infection. METHODS AND RESULTS: We conducted a prospective echocardiographic evaluation of 48 patients (mean age 58 ± 13 years, 69% male) hospitalized 6 ± 1 month earlier for a laboratory-confirmed and symptomatic COVID-19. Thirty-two (66.6%) had pre-existing cardiovascular risks factors (systemic hypertension, diabetes, or dyslipidaemia), and three patients (6.2%) had a known prior myocardial infarction. Sixteen patients (33.3%) experienced myocardial injury during the index COVID-19 hospitalization as identified by a rise in cardiac troponin levels. Six months later, 60.4% of patients still reported clinical symptoms including exercise dyspnoea for 56%. Echocardiographic measurements under resting conditions were not different between patients with versus without myocardial injury during the acute COVID-19 phase. In contrast, low-level exercise (25W for 3 min) induced a significant increase in the average E/e' ratio (10.1 ± 4.3 vs. 7.3 ± 11.5, P = 0.01) and the systolic pulmonary artery pressure (33.4 ± 7.8 vs. 25.6 ± 5.3 mmHg, P = 0.02) in patients with myocardial injury during the acute COVID-19 phase. Sensitivity analyses showed that these alterations of left ventricular diastolic markers were observed regardless of whether of cardiovascular risk factors or established cardiac diseases indicating SARS-CoV-2 infection as a primary cause. CONCLUSIONS: Six months after the acute COVID-19 phase, significant cardiac diastolic abnormalities are observed in patients who experienced myocardial injury but not in patients without cardiac involvement.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Heart , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol ; 2021 Feb 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1116453

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Kidney involvement is frequent among patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), and occurrence of AKI is associated with higher mortality in this population. The objective of this study was to describe occurrence and significance of proteinuria in this setting. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS & MEASUREMENTS : We conducted a single-center retrospective study to describe the characteristic features of proteinuria measured within 48 hours following admission among patients with COVID-19 admitted in a tertiary care hospital in France, and to evaluate its association with initiation of dialysis, intensive care unit admission, and death. RESULTS: Among 200 patients with available data, urine protein-creatinine ratio at admission was ≥1 g/g for 84 (42%), although kidney function was normal in most patients, with a median serum creatinine of 0.94 mg/dl (interquartile range, 0.75-1.21). Median urine albumin-creatinine ratio was 110 mg/g (interquartile range, 50-410), with a urine albumin-protein ratio <50% in 92% of patients. Urine retinol binding protein concentrations, available for 85 patients, were ≥0.03 mg/mmol in 62% of patients. Urine protein-creatinine ratio ≥1 g/g was associated with initiation of dialysis (odds ratio, 4.87; 95% confidence interval, 2.03 to 13.0; P<0.001), admission to the intensive care unit (odds ratio, 3.55; 95% confidence interval, 1.93 to 6.71; P<0.001), and death (odds ratio, 3.56; 95% confidence interval, 1.90 to 6.54; P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Proteinuria is very frequent among patients admitted for COVID-19 and may precede AKI. Low levels of albuminuria suggest a predominant tubular origin, confirmed by the elevated levels of urine retinol binding protein. Urine protein-creatinine ratio ≥1 g/g at admission is strongly associated with poor kidney and patient outcome.

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