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1.
Revue Medicale Suisse ; 16(713):2119-2122, 2020.
Article in French | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1897431
2.
Genetics in Medicine ; 24(3):S186, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1768095

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Studies of telehealth genetic counseling (THGC) services, including videoconferencing and telephone counseling, have highlighted the need for further research on the patient experience. The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in a rapid shift from in-person genetic counseling to THGC. Most studies to date focused on THGC for cancer genetics, with only a handful of studies investigating patient satisfaction for other subspecialties. This study assessed patients’ perspectives of the advantages and disadvantages of THGC and their satisfaction with this service delivery model for multiple subspecialties. Methods: A patient satisfaction survey was designed to assess the experience of study participants at the time of referral, scheduling, during, and after the THGC appointment, as well as participants’ overall satisfaction with the THGC process. Survey invitations were emailed to 485 patients between December 2020 and September 2021 following their last anticipated THGC appointment. Descriptive statistics were used for the analysis. One-way ANOVA was used to measure differences in reported satisfaction across subspecialties. Results: A total of 103 patients responded (21.2%;103/485). Almost half of participants reported that they were referred for hereditary cancer counseling (48.5%;49/101) followed by reproductive genetics (13.9%;14/101), neurogenetics (12.9%;13/101), cardiogenetics (7.9%;8/101), clinical genomics/exome sequencing (3%;3/101), and ophthalmology (2%;2/101). Most respondents (90.7%;88/97) elected a telephone appointment versus videoconferencing, with the most common reason being “because it was easier” (70.8%;63/89). Patient-perceived advantages of a THGC appointment were not needing to travel (94.5%;86/91) and the ability to get an appointment that worked with their schedule (82.4%;75/91). Safety concerns related to COVID-19 were cited as a benefit of THGC for 38.5% (35/91). Patient-perceived drawbacks included someone overhearing the conversation who was not invited (14.4%;14/97) and distraction by other adults or children (7.2%;7/97). Only 7.9% (7/89) of respondents agreed or strongly agreed with the statement “If I needed genetic counseling again, I would choose an in-person appointment.” Nearly all respondents agreed or strongly agreed with the following statements: “I received the same care by telephone or video as I would expect at an in-person appointment” (95.5%;85/89), “I would recommend a phone or video appointment for genetic counseling to family and friends” (89.9%;80/89), and “Overall, I am satisfied with the quality of the appointment” (98.9%;88/89). There was no statistical difference in reported satisfaction across subspecialties (p = 0.823). Conclusion: Respondents for all subspecialties overwhelmingly reported that they were satisfied with the THGC experience. Some studies have suggested that providers prefer videoconferencing appointments. However, the vast majority of patients who responded to this survey elected telephone appointments, providing insight into patient preferences for THGC services. Although this survey was distributed during the pandemic, the most frequently selected benefits were related to logistical and scheduling issues as opposed to safety concerns related to COVID-19. These data support the use of THGC across multiple specialties as a patient-desired model of care, and helps to fill a gap in the literature by examining the experiences of patients seen for multiple subspecialties, beyond cancer genetics.

4.
Phi Delta Kappan ; 103(5):62-63, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1706769

ABSTRACT

Education became a major issue in the 2021 Virginia gubernatorial election, when Democratic candidate Terry McAuliffe and Republican Glenn Youngkin clashed over how much say parents should have in their children’s education. Youngkin’s victory, fueled in part by parent outrage over school curricula, could lead other candidates to stoke fear and outrage over schools to score political points. Maria Ferguson discusses the power of schools to divide society and considers what lessons schools should take from the COVID-19 crisis. © 2022 by Phi Delta Kappa International.

5.
Phi Delta Kappan ; 103(5):62-63, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1685832
6.
Phi Delta Kappan ; 103(3):62-63, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1511606

ABSTRACT

Maria Ferguson talks with Lindsay E. Jones, president and CEO of the National Center for Learning Disabilities, about the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on students with disabilities. So far, there has been little research into the effects of the pandemic, but previous research shows that being away from school has more of an effect on students with learning disabilities. They also discuss how states are planning to use the funds made available under the American Recovery Plan and the challenge of balancing the need for flexibility to distribute funds quickly with the need to ensure that students’ needs are being met. © 2021 by Phi Delta Kappa International.

7.
Frontiers in Communication ; 6:17, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1409094

ABSTRACT

Visual narratives are promising tools for science and health communication, especially for broad audiences in times of public health crisis, such as during the COVID-19 pandemic. In this study, we used the Lifeology illustrated "flashcard" course platform to construct visual narratives about COVID-19, and then assessed their impact on behavioral intentions. We conducted a survey experiment among 1,775 health app users. Participants viewed illustrated (sequential art) courses about: 1) sleep, 2) what COVID-19 is and how to protect oneself, 3) mechanisms of how the virus works in the body and risk factors for severe disease. Each participant viewed one of these courses and then answered questions about their understanding of the course, how much they learned, and their perceptions and behavioral intentions toward COVID-19. Participants generally evaluated "flashcard" courses as easy to understand. Viewing a COVID-19 "flashcard" course was also associated with improved self-efficacy and behavioral intentions toward COVID-19 disease prevention as compared to viewing a "flashcard" course about sleep science. Our findings support the use of visual narratives to improve health literacy and provide individuals with the capacity to act on health information that they may know of but find difficult to process or apply to their daily lives.

8.
J Laryngol Otol ; 135(8): 675-679, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1232054

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Acute epistaxis can be a life-threatening airway emergency, requiring in-patient admission. The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic placed significant strain on hospital resources, and management has shifted towards an out-patient-centred approach. METHODS: A five-month single-centre retrospective study was undertaken of all epistaxis patients managed by the ENT department. A pre-coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic group was managed with pre-existing guidelines, compared to new guidelines for the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic group. A telephone survey was performed on out-patients with non-dissolvable packs to assess patient comfort and satisfaction. RESULTS: A total of 142 patients were seen. The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic group had significantly more patients aged over 65 years (p = 0.004), an increased use of absorbable dressings and local haemostatic agents (Nasopore and Surgiflo), and fewer admissions (all p < 0.0005). Rates of re-presentation and morbidity, and length of hospital stay were similar. The telephone survey revealed out-patient management to be efficacious and feasible. CONCLUSION: The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has shifted epistaxis management towards local haemostatic agents and out-patient management; this approach is as safe and effective as previously well-established regimens.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Epistaxis/therapy , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Female , Forecasting , Hemostatic Techniques , Hospital Departments , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Otolaryngology , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Retrospective Studies , United Kingdom/epidemiology
9.
J Intern Med ; 289(4): 559-573, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1096894

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Convalescent plasma therapy for COVID-19 relies on transfer of anti-viral antibody from donors to recipients via plasma transfusion. The relationship between clinical characteristics and antibody response to COVID-19 is not well defined. We investigated predictors of convalescent antibody production and quantified recipient antibody response in a convalescent plasma therapy clinical trial. METHODS: Multivariable analysis of clinical and serological parameters in 103 confirmed COVID-19 convalescent plasma donors 28 days or more following symptom resolution was performed. Mixed-effects regression models with piecewise linear trends were used to characterize serial antibody responses in 10 convalescent plasma recipients with severe COVID-19. RESULTS: Donor antibody titres ranged from 0 to 1 : 3892 (anti-receptor binding domain (RBD)) and 0 to 1 : 3289 (anti-spike). Higher anti-RBD and anti-spike titres were associated with increased age, hospitalization for COVID-19, fever and absence of myalgia (all P < 0.05). Fatigue was significantly associated with anti-RBD (P = 0.03). In pairwise comparison amongst ABO blood types, AB donors had higher anti-RBD and anti-spike than O donors (P < 0.05). No toxicity was associated with plasma transfusion. Non-ECMO recipient anti-RBD antibody titre increased on average 31% per day during the first three days post-transfusion (P = 0.01) and anti-spike antibody titre by 40.3% (P = 0.02). CONCLUSION: Advanced age, fever, absence of myalgia, fatigue, blood type and hospitalization were associated with higher convalescent antibody titre to COVID-19. Despite variability in donor titre, 80% of convalescent plasma recipients showed significant increase in antibody levels post-transfusion. A more complete understanding of the dose-response effect of plasma transfusion amongst COVID-19-infected patients is needed.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibody Formation/immunology , COVID-19 Serological Testing , COVID-19/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Symptom Assessment , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19 Serological Testing/methods , COVID-19 Serological Testing/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Immunization, Passive/methods , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Symptom Assessment/methods , Symptom Assessment/statistics & numerical data , Treatment Outcome , United States
10.
Academe ; 106(2), 2020.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-824935
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