Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 9 de 9
Filter
1.
J Infect Dis ; 225(5): 820-824, 2022 03 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1722476

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Previous reports highlighted the efficacy of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against coronavirus disease 2019. METHODS: We conducted a prospective study on the clinical outcome and antiviral effects of mAbs added to standard of care therapy in SARS-CoV-2-infected patients with primary antibody defects. RESULTS: Median time of SARS-CoV-2 quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) positivity was shorter in 8 patients treated with mAbs (22 days) than in 10 patients treated with standard of care therapy only (37 days, P=.026). Median time of SARS-CoV-2 qPCR positivity from mAb administration was 10 days. CONCLUSIONS: The SARS-CoV-2 mAbs treatment was effective and well tolerated in patients with primary antibody defects.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Common Variable Immunodeficiency , Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological , Humans , Prospective Studies , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Standard of Care
2.
J Infect Dis ; 225(5): 820-824, 2022 03 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506650

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Previous reports highlighted the efficacy of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against coronavirus disease 2019. METHODS: We conducted a prospective study on the clinical outcome and antiviral effects of mAbs added to standard of care therapy in SARS-CoV-2-infected patients with primary antibody defects. RESULTS: Median time of SARS-CoV-2 quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) positivity was shorter in 8 patients treated with mAbs (22 days) than in 10 patients treated with standard of care therapy only (37 days, P=.026). Median time of SARS-CoV-2 qPCR positivity from mAb administration was 10 days. CONCLUSIONS: The SARS-CoV-2 mAbs treatment was effective and well tolerated in patients with primary antibody defects.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Common Variable Immunodeficiency , Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological , Humans , Prospective Studies , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Standard of Care
3.
Cells ; 10(11)2021 10 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488494

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with primary antibody deficiencies are at risk in the current COVID-19 pandemic due to their impaired response to infection and vaccination. Specifically, patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) generated poor spike-specific antibody and T cell responses after immunization. METHODS: Thirty-four CVID convalescent patients after SARS-CoV-2 infection, 38 CVID patients immunized with two doses of the BNT162b2 vaccine, and 20 SARS-CoV-2 CVID convalescents later and immunized with BNT162b2 were analyzed for the anti-spike IgG production and the generation of spike-specific memory B cells and T cells. RESULTS: Spike-specific IgG was induced more frequently after infection than after vaccination (82% vs. 34%). The antibody response was boosted in convalescents by vaccination. Although immunized patients generated atypical memory B cells possibly by extra-follicular or incomplete germinal center reactions, convalescents responded to infection by generating spike-specific memory B cells that were improved by the subsequent immunization. Poor spike-specific T cell responses were measured independently from the immunological challenge. CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV-2 infection primed a more efficient classical memory B cell response, whereas the BNT162b2 vaccine induced non-canonical B cell responses in CVID. Natural infection responses were boosted by subsequent immunization, suggesting the possibility to further stimulate the immune response by additional vaccine doses in CVID.


Subject(s)
/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/prevention & control , Convalescence , Female , Humans , Immunization , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases/complications , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
5.
Front Pediatr ; 9: 638871, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1457675

ABSTRACT

With birth, the newborn is transferred from a quasi-sterile environment to the outside world. At this time, the neonatal immune system is inexperienced and continuously subject to a process of development as it encounters different antigenic stimuli after birth. It is initially characterized by a bias toward T helper 2 phenotype, reduced T helper 1, and cytotoxic responses to microbial stimuli, low levels of memory, and effector T and B cells and a high production of suppressive T regulatory cells. The aim of this setting, during fetal life, is to maintain an anti-inflammatory state and immune-tolerance. Maternal antibodies are transferred during pregnancy through the placenta and, in the first weeks of life of the newborn, they represent a powerful tool for protection. Thus, optimization of vaccination in pregnancy represents an important strategy to reduce the burden of neonatal infections and sepsis. Beneficial effects of maternal immunization are universally recognized, although the optimal timing of vaccination in pregnancy remains to be defined. Interestingly, the dynamic exchange that takes place at the fetal-maternal interface allows the transfer not only of antibodies, but also of maternal antigen presenting cells, probably in order to stimulate the developing fetal immune system in a harmless way. There are still controversial effects related to maternal immunization including the so called "immunology blunting," i.e., a dampened antibody production following infant's vaccination in those infants who received placentally transferred maternal immunity. However, clinical relevance of this phenomenon is still not clear. This review will provide an overview of the evolution of the immune system in early life and discuss the benefits of maternal vaccination. Current maternal vaccination policies and their rationale will be summarized on the road to promising approaches to enhance immunity in the neonate.

6.
Cells ; 10(10)2021 09 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438527

ABSTRACT

Specific memory B cells and antibodies are a reliable read-out of vaccine efficacy. We analysed these biomarkers after one and two doses of BNT162b2 vaccine. The second dose significantly increases the level of highly specific memory B cells and antibodies. Two months after the second dose, specific antibody levels decline, but highly specific memory B cells continue to increase, thus predicting a sustained protection from COVID-19. We show that although mucosal IgA is not induced by the vaccination, memory B cells migrate in response to inflammation and secrete IgA at mucosal sites. We show that the first vaccine dose may lead to an insufficient number of highly specific memory B cells and low concentration of serum antibodies, thus leaving vaccinees without the immune robustness needed to ensure viral elimination and herd immunity. We also clarify that the reduction of serum antibodies does not diminish the force and duration of the immune protection induced by vaccination. The vaccine does not induce sterilizing immunity. Infection after vaccination may be caused by the lack of local preventive immunity because of the absence of mucosal IgA.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/cytology , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Immunoglobulin A/immunology , Immunologic Memory , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antigens, Viral/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , Cryopreservation , Female , Health Personnel , Healthy Volunteers , Hospitals, Pediatric , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , Immunoglobulin M/immunology , Lactation , Male , Middle Aged , Mucous Membrane/immunology , Patient Safety , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
7.
Front Immunol ; 12: 690534, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1348488

ABSTRACT

High quality medical assistance and preventive strategies, including pursuing a healthy lifestyle, result in a progressively growing percentage of older people. The population and workforce is aging in all countries of the world. It is widely recognized that older individuals show an increased susceptibility to infections and a reduced response to vaccination suggesting that the aged immune system is less able to react and consequently protect the organism. The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic is dramatically showing us that the organism reacts to novel pathogens in an age-dependent manner. The decline of the immune system observed in aging remains unclear. We aimed to understand the role of B cells. We analyzed peripheral blood from children (4-18 years); young people (23-60 years) and elderly people (65-91 years) by flow cytometry. We also measured antibody secretion by ELISA following a T-independent stimulation. Here we show that the elderly have a significant reduction of CD27dull memory B cells, a population that bridges innate and adaptive immune functions. In older people, memory B cells are mostly high specialized antigen-selected CD27bright. Moreover, after in vitro stimulation with CpG, B cells from older individuals produced significantly fewer IgM and IgA antibodies compared to younger individuals. Aging is a complex process characterized by a functional decline in multiple physiological systems. The immune system of older people is well equipped to react to often encountered antigens but has a low ability to respond to new pathogens.


Subject(s)
Aging/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19 , Immunologic Memory , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , Child , Child, Preschool , Cytokines/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin A/immunology , Immunoglobulin M/immunology , Male , Middle Aged
9.
Front Cell Infect Microbiol ; 11: 655896, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1200086

ABSTRACT

A large repertoire of IgA is produced by B lymphocytes with T-independent and T-dependent mechanisms useful in defense against pathogenic microorganisms and to reduce immune activation. IgA is active against several pathogens, including rotavirus, poliovirus, influenza virus, and SARS-CoV-2. It protects the epithelial barriers from pathogens and modulates excessive immune responses in inflammatory diseases. An early SARS-CoV-2 specific humoral response is dominated by IgA antibodies responses greatly contributing to virus neutralization. The lack of anti-SARS-Cov-2 IgA and secretory IgA (sIgA) might represent a possible cause of COVID-19 severity, vaccine failure, and possible cause of prolonged viral shedding in patients with Primary Antibody Deficiencies, including patients with Selective IgA Deficiency. Differently from other primary antibody deficiency entities, Selective IgA Deficiency occurs in the vast majority of patients as an asymptomatic condition, and it is often an unrecognized, Studies are needed to clarify the open questions raised by possible consequences of a lack of an IgA response to SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/immunology , IgA Deficiency , Immunoglobulin A/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Virus Shedding
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL