Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 13 de 13
Filter
1.
J Med Virol ; 95(3): e28660, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2271465

ABSTRACT

Recently, a benefit from administration of a 3-day course of early remdesivir (ER) in the outpatients' setting was reported. However, real-life data on its use is scarce. Therefore, we explored the ER clinical outcome in our outpatients' s cohort, compared to untreated controls. We included all patients who were prescribed ER from February to May 2022 and followed them up for 3 months and compared patients who received treatment with untreated controls. In the two groups the following outcomes were investigated: hospitalization and mortality rate, time of negativization and symptom's resolution, and postacute coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) syndrome prevalence. Overall, 681 patients were analyzed, mostly females (53.6%), and with a median age of 66 years (interquartile range: 54-77), 316 (46.4%) patients received ER, and 365 (53.6%) did not receive antiviral treatment (control group). Overall, 8.5% patients eventually required oxygen support, 8.7% were hospitalized for COVID-19, and 1.5% died. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) immunization and ER (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 0.049 [0.015; 0.16], p < 0.001) independently reduced hospitalization risk. ER was significantly associated with a shorter duration of SARS-CoV-2 positivity at nasopharyngeal swabs (aß -8.15 [-9.21; -7.09], p < 0.001) and of symptoms (aß -5.11 [-5.82; -4.39], p < 0.001), and with lower rate of COVID-19 sequelae compared to control group (aOR: 0.18 [0.10; 0.31], p < 0.001). Even in the SARS-CoV-2 vaccination and Omicron era, in patients at high risk of developing severe disease, ER demonstrated to have a good safety profile and to significantly reduce the risk of disease progression and COVID-19 sequelae compared to untreated controls.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , Female , Humans , Aged , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Cohort Studies , COVID-19 Vaccines , Treatment Outcome , COVID-19 Drug Treatment , Hospitalization
2.
Viruses ; 15(2)2023 01 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2216975

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Molnupiravir (MOL) and nirmatrelvir/ritonavir (NIR) were recently approved for the early treatment of COVID-19, but real-life data on tolerability, safety, and adverse events (AEs) are still scarce. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study including all patients who were prescribed MOL and NIR at the Infectious Diseases Unit of Padua University Hospital, between January and May 2022. Demographic, clinical, and safety variables were recorded. RESULTS: We included 909 patients, 48.3% males and 95.2% vaccinated against SARS-CoV-2. The median age was 73 (IQR: 62-82) years. MOL and NIR were prescribed in 407 (44.8%) and 502 (55.2%) patients, respectively. Overall, 124/909 (13.6%) patients experienced any AEs following antivirals intake: 98/124 (79%) patients reporting adverse events presented grade 1 AEs, 23/124 (18.5%) grade 2 AEs and 3 (2.5%) grade 3 AEs. Treatment discontinuation was recorded in 4.8% of patients. AEs were significantly higher in women, in patients treated with NIR compared to MOL and in people who were not vaccinated. CONCLUSIONS: In our real-life setting, AEs were higher than those reported by clinical trials, and were particularly associated with NIR use and with not being vaccinated. Further analyses are needed to better assess safety of oral antivirals and to define which patient's profile may benefit most from MOL and NIR.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ritonavir , Male , Humans , Female , Aged , Retrospective Studies , Ritonavir/adverse effects , COVID-19 Drug Treatment , SARS-CoV-2 , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects
3.
BMJ Open ; 12(4): e052665, 2022 04 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779369

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We aimed at identifying baseline predictive factors for emergency department (ED) readmission, with hospitalisation/death, in patients with COVID-19 previously discharged from the ED. We also developed a disease progression velocity index. DESIGN AND SETTING: Retrospective cohort study of prospectively collected data. The charts of consecutive patients with COVID-19 discharged from the Reggio Emilia (Italy) ED (2 March 2 to 31 March 2020) were retrospectively examined. Clinical, laboratory and CT findings at first ED admission were tested as predictive factors using multivariable logistic models. We divided CT extension by days from symptom onset to build a synthetic velocity index. PARTICIPANTS: 450 patients discharged from the ED with diagnosis of COVID-19. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: ED readmission within 14 days, followed by hospitalisation/death. RESULTS: Of the discharged patients, 84 (18.7%) were readmitted to the ED, 61 (13.6%) were hospitalised and 10 (2.2%) died. Age (OR=1.05; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.08), Charlson Comorbidity Index 3 versus 0 (OR=11.61; 95% CI 1.76 to 76.58), days from symptom onset (OR for 1-day increase=0.81; 95% CI 0.73 to 0.90) and CT extension (OR for 1% increase=1.03; 95% CI 1.01 to 1.06) were associated in a multivariable model for readmission with hospitalisation/death. A 2-day lag velocity index was a strong predictor (OR for unit increase=1.21, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.36); the model including this index resulted in less information loss. CONCLUSIONS: A velocity index combining CT extension and days from symptom onset predicts disease progression in patients with COVID-19. For example, a 20% CT extension 3 days after symptom onset has the same risk as does 50% after 10 days.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Patient Readmission , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Disease Progression , Emergency Service, Hospital , Humans , Patient Discharge , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
4.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health ; 19(7):3826, 2022.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-1762165

ABSTRACT

Background: Real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real time RT-PCR) testing is the gold standard for the diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 infections. However, to expand the testing capacity, new SARS-CoV-2 rapid antigen tests (Ag-RDTs) have been implemented. Ag-RDTs are more rapid, but less reliable in terms of sensitivity, and real-life data on their performance in comparison with the real time RT-PCR test are lacking. Methods: We aimed at assessing the diagnostic performance of the third-generation antigenic swab LumiraDx™compared with real time RT-PCR in a retrospective cohort study at the Infectious Diseases Unit of Padua. All of the patients who were consecutively tested for SARS-CoV-2 in our centre (by both real time RT-PCR and Ag-RTD LumiraDxTM) from 19 January to 30 May 2021, were included. Cycle-threshold (Ct) values of positive real time RT-PCR were recorded as well as the number of days from symptoms' onset to testing. Results: Among the 282 patients included, 80.9% (N = 228) tested positive to real time RT-PCR, and among these, 174 tested positive also to LumiraDx™. Compared with real time RT-PCR, which is considered as the gold standard for the assessment of the presence/absence of SARS-CoV-2 infection, LumiraDx™showed an overall sensitivity of 76.3% and specificity of 94.4%. Sensitivity increased to 91% when testing was performed <10 days from symptoms' onset, and to 95% when considering Ct < 25. Multivariable binomial logistic regression showed that false negative LumiraDx™results were significantly associated with high Ct values, and with further testing from symptoms' onset. Conclusions: The results of our study suggested that the LumiraDx™SARS-CoV-2 antigen assay may be appropriate for the detection of SARS-CoV-2 infection, especially in its early phase when the test largely meets the performance requirements of the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC).

5.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 823600, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1707730

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Few is known about the long-term pulmonary sequelae after COVID-19 infection. Hence, the aim of this study is to characterize patients with persisting pulmonary sequelae at follow-up after hospitalization. We also aimed to explore clinical and radiological predictors of pulmonary fibrosis following COVID-19. METHODS: Two hundred and 20 consecutive patients were evaluated at 3-6 months after discharge with high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and categorized as recovered (REC) or not recovered (NOT-REC). Both HRCTs at hospitalization (HRCT0), when available, and HRCT1 during follow-up were analyzed semiquantitatively as follows: ground-glass opacities (alveolar score, AS), consolidations (CONS), and reticulations (interstitial score, IS). RESULTS: A total of 175/220 (80%) patients showed disease resolution at their initial radiological evaluation following discharge. NOT-REC patients (45/220; 20%) were mostly older men [66 (35-85) years vs. 56 (19-87); p = 0.03] with a longer in-hospital stay [16 (0-75) vs. 8 (1-52) days; p < 0.0001], and lower P/F at admission [233 (40-424) vs. 318 (33-543); p = 0.04]. Moreover, NOT-REC patients presented, at hospital admission, higher ALV [14 (0.0-62.0) vs. 4.4 (0.0-44.0); p = 0.0005], CONS [1.9 (0.0-26.0) vs. 0.4 (0.0-18.0); p = 0.0064], and IS [11.5 (0.0- 29.0) vs. 0.0 (0.0-22.0); p < 0.0001] compared to REC patients. On multivariate analysis, the presence of CONS and IS at HRCT0 was independent predictors of radiological sequelae at follow-up [OR 14.87 (95% CI: 1.25-175.8; p = 0.03) and 28.9 (95% CI: 2.17-386.6; p = 0.01, respectively)]. CONCLUSIONS: In our population, only twenty percent of patients showed persistent lung abnormalities at 6 months after hospitalization for COVID-19 pneumonia. These patients are predominantly older men with longer hospital stay. The presence of reticulations and consolidation on HRCT at hospital admission predicts the persistence of radiological abnormalities during follow-up.

6.
Frontiers in medicine ; 8, 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1678732

ABSTRACT

Background Few is known about the long-term pulmonary sequelae after COVID-19 infection. Hence, the aim of this study is to characterize patients with persisting pulmonary sequelae at follow-up after hospitalization. We also aimed to explore clinical and radiological predictors of pulmonary fibrosis following COVID-19. Methods Two hundred and 20 consecutive patients were evaluated at 3–6 months after discharge with high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and categorized as recovered (REC) or not recovered (NOT-REC). Both HRCTs at hospitalization (HRCT0), when available, and HRCT1 during follow-up were analyzed semiquantitatively as follows: ground-glass opacities (alveolar score, AS), consolidations (CONS), and reticulations (interstitial score, IS). Results A total of 175/220 (80%) patients showed disease resolution at their initial radiological evaluation following discharge. NOT-REC patients (45/220;20%) were mostly older men [66 (35–85) years vs. 56 (19–87);p = 0.03] with a longer in-hospital stay [16 (0–75) vs. 8 (1–52) days;p < 0.0001], and lower P/F at admission [233 (40–424) vs. 318 (33–543);p = 0.04]. Moreover, NOT-REC patients presented, at hospital admission, higher ALV [14 (0.0–62.0) vs. 4.4 (0.0–44.0);p = 0.0005], CONS [1.9 (0.0–26.0) vs. 0.4 (0.0–18.0);p = 0.0064], and IS [11.5 (0.0– 29.0) vs. 0.0 (0.0–22.0);p < 0.0001] compared to REC patients. On multivariate analysis, the presence of CONS and IS at HRCT0 was independent predictors of radiological sequelae at follow-up [OR 14.87 (95% CI: 1.25–175.8;p = 0.03) and 28.9 (95% CI: 2.17–386.6;p = 0.01, respectively)]. Conclusions In our population, only twenty percent of patients showed persistent lung abnormalities at 6 months after hospitalization for COVID-19 pneumonia. These patients are predominantly older men with longer hospital stay. The presence of reticulations and consolidation on HRCT at hospital admission predicts the persistence of radiological abnormalities during follow-up.

7.
Diabetes ; 71(4): 788-794, 2022 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1643401

ABSTRACT

Admission hyperglycemia has emerged worldwide as a predictor of poor coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outcome. Hyperglycemia leads to a defect in circulating hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), which, in turn, predicts diabetic complications. Here, we explored whether reduced HSPCs mediated at least part of the prognostic effect of hyperglycemia on COVID-19 outcome. We found that patients with COVID-19 (n = 100) hospitalized in a nonintensive setting displayed dramatically (50-60%) reduced levels of HSPCs measured by flow cytometry as CD34+, CD34+CD45dim, or CD34+CD133+ cells, compared with control subjects (n = 595). This finding was highly significant (all P < 10-10) after multivariable adjustment, or manual 1:1 patient match, or propensity score matching. Admission hyperglycemia (≥7.0 mmol/L) was present in 45% of patients, was associated with a significant further ∼30% HSPCs reduction, and predicted a 2.6-fold increased risk of the primary outcome of adverse COVID-19 course (admittance to the intensive care unit or death). Low HSPCs were also associated with advanced age, higher peak C-reactive protein, and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio. Independently from confounders, 1 SD lower CD34+ HSPCs was associated with a more than threefold higher risk of adverse outcome. Upon formal analysis, reduction of HSPCs was a significant mediator of the admission hyperglycemia on COVID-19 outcome, being responsible for 28% of its prognostic effect.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hyperglycemia , Antigens, CD34/metabolism , Flow Cytometry , Hematopoietic Stem Cells/metabolism , Humans , Hyperglycemia/metabolism
8.
Eur Radiol ; 31(12): 9164-9175, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1224990

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to develop a multiparametric prognostic model for death in COVID-19 patients and to assess the incremental value of CT disease extension over clinical parameters. METHODS: Consecutive patients who presented to all five of the emergency rooms of the Reggio Emilia province between February 27 and March 23, 2020, for suspected COVID-19, underwent chest CT, and had a positive swab within 10 days were included in this retrospective study. Age, sex, comorbidities, days from symptom onset, and laboratory data were retrieved from institutional information systems. CT disease extension was visually graded as < 20%, 20-39%, 40-59%, or ≥ 60%. The association between clinical and CT variables with death was estimated with univariable and multivariable Cox proportional hazards models; model performance was assessed using k-fold cross-validation for the area under the ROC curve (cvAUC). RESULTS: Of the 866 included patients (median age 59.8, women 39.2%), 93 (10.74%) died. Clinical variables significantly associated with death in multivariable model were age, male sex, HDL cholesterol, dementia, heart failure, vascular diseases, time from symptom onset, neutrophils, LDH, and oxygen saturation level. CT disease extension was also independently associated with death (HR = 7.56, 95% CI = 3.49; 16.38 for ≥ 60% extension). cvAUCs were 0.927 (bootstrap bias-corrected 95% CI = 0.899-0.947) for the clinical model and 0.936 (bootstrap bias-corrected 95% CI = 0.912-0.953) when adding CT extension. CONCLUSIONS: A prognostic model based on clinical variables is highly accurate in predicting death in COVID-19 patients. Adding CT disease extension to the model scarcely improves its accuracy. KEY POINTS: • Early identification of COVID-19 patients at higher risk of disease progression and death is crucial; the role of CT scan in defining prognosis is unclear. • A clinical model based on age, sex, comorbidities, days from symptom onset, and laboratory results was highly accurate in predicting death in COVID-19 patients presenting to the emergency room. • Disease extension assessed with CT was independently associated with death when added to the model but did not produce a valuable increase in accuracy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Service, Hospital , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
9.
PLoS One ; 16(2): e0247275, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1097208

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of this secondary analysis of the TESEO cohort is to identify, early in the course of treatment with tocilizumab, factors associated with the risk of progressing to mechanical ventilation and death and develop a risk score to estimate the risk of this outcome according to patients' profile. METHODS: Patients with COVID-19 severe pneumonia receiving standard of care + tocilizumab who were alive and free from mechanical ventilation at day 6 after treatment initiation were included in this retrospective, multicenter cohort study. Multivariable logistic regression models were built to identify predictors of mechanical ventilation or death by day-28 from treatment initiation and ß-coefficients were used to develop a risk score. Secondary outcome was mortality. Patients with the same inclusion criteria as the derivation cohort from 3 independent hospitals were used as validation cohort. RESULTS: 266 patients treated with tocilizumab were included. By day 28 of hospital follow-up post treatment initiation, 40 (15%) underwent mechanical ventilation or died [26 (10%)]. At multivariable analysis, sex, day-4 PaO2/FiO2 ratio, platelets and CRP were independently associated with the risk of developing the study outcomes and were used to generate the proposed risk score. The accuracy of the score in AUC was 0.80 and 0.70 in internal validation and test for the composite endpoint and 0.92 and 0.69 for death, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our score could assist clinicians in identifying, early after tocilizumab administration, patients who are likely to progress to mechanical ventilation or death, so that they could be selected for eventual rescue therapies.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , COVID-19 Drug Treatment , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Aged , Cohort Studies , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Treatment Outcome
10.
Curr Oncol ; 28(1): 847-852, 2021 02 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1069796

ABSTRACT

The pandemic of SARS-CoV-2 is a serious global challenge affecting millions of people worldwide. Cancer patients are at risk for infection exposure and serious complications. A prompt diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection is crucial for the timely adoption of isolation measures and the appropriate management of cancer treatments. In lung cancer patients the symptoms of infection 19 may resemble those exhibited by the underlying oncologic condition, possibly leading to diagnostic overlap and delays. Moreover, cancer patients might display a prolonged positivity of nasopharyngeal RT-PCR assays for SARS-CoV-2, causing long interruptions or delay of cancer treatments. However, the association between the positivity of RT-PCR assays and the patient's infectivity remains uncertain. We describe the case of a patient with non-small cell lung cancer, and a severe ab extrinseco compression of the trachea, whose palliative radiotherapy was delayed because of the prolonged positivity of nasopharyngeal swabs for SARS-CoV-2. The patient did not show clinical symptoms suggestive of active infection, but the persistent positivity of RT-PCR assays imposed the continuation of isolation measures and the delay of radiotherapy for over two months. Finally, the negative result of SARS-CoV-2 viral culture allowed us to verify the absence of viral activity and to rule out the infectivity of the patient, who could finally continue her cancer treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/virology , Lung Neoplasms/virology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Aged , Carrier State/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Nasopharynx/virology , RNA, Viral/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Time-to-Treatment
11.
Eur J Public Health ; 31(2): 278-279, 2021 04 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1052198

ABSTRACT

All vitamin D tests carried out for outpatients aged 18 years or older during the last 3 years at an Italian University Hospital was reviewed. The serum vitamin D concentrations measured since the Italian coronavirus diseases 2019 (COVID-19) lockdown to present did not significantly differ from the previous 2 years (78 vs. 77 nmol/l; P = 0.277), whilst the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency was found to be even marginally lower in 2020 (16.0% vs. 17.9%; P = 0.003). These results suggest that vitamin D deficiency in our province has not increased during the Italian COVID-19 outbreak or in correspondence with the nationwide lockdown.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quarantine , Vitamin D Deficiency , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Vitamin D/blood , Vitamin D Deficiency/epidemiology
12.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 934, 2020 Dec 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-965904

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Identifying risk factors for severe novel-coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is useful to ascertain which patients may benefit from advanced supportive care. The study offers a description of COVID-19 patients, admitted to a general ward for a non-critical clinical picture, with the aim to analyse the differences between those transferred to the intensive (ICU) and/or sub-intensive care (SICU) units and those who were not. METHODS: This observational retrospective study includes all COVID-19 patients admitted to the Infectious Diseases Unit. Clinical, laboratory, radiological and treatment data were collected. The primary outcome was a composite of need of transfer to the ICU and/or SICU during the hospitalization. Patients who did not require to be transferred are defined as Group 1; patients who were transferred to the ICU and/or SICU are defined as Group 2. Demographic, clinical characteristics and laboratory findings at the 1st, 3rd and last measurements were compared between the two groups. RESULTS: 303 were included. The median age was 62 years. 69 patients (22.8%) met the primary outcome and were defined as Group 2. The overall fatality rate was 6.8%. Group 2 patients were predominantly male (76.8% vs. 55.1%, p < 0.01), had a higher fatality rate (14.5% vs. 3.8%, p < 0,01), had more hypertension (72.4% vs. 44%, p < 0,01) and diabetes (31.9% vs. 21%, p = 0.04) and were more likely to present dry cough (49.3% vs. 25.2%, p < 0.01). Overall, chest X-ray at admission showed findings suggestive of pneumonia in 63.2%, and Group 2 were more likely to develop pathological findings during the hospitalization (72.7% vs. 17.2%, p = 0.01). At admission, Group 2 presented significantly higher neutrophil count, aspartate-transaminase and C-Reactive-Protein. At the 3rd measurement, Group 2 presented persistently higher neutrophil count, hepatic inflammation markers and C-Reactive-Protein. Group 1 presented a shorter duration from admission to negativization of follow-up swabs (20 vs. 35 days, p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: The presence of comorbidities and the persistent observation of abnormal laboratory findings should be regarded as predisposing factors for clinical worsening.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Care/methods , Patient Transfer , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Aged , Aspartate Aminotransferases/blood , Biomarkers/blood , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Comorbidity , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Italy/epidemiology , Leukocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils/immunology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Time Factors
13.
J Clin Med ; 9(9)2020 Sep 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-892450

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has rapidly become a global pandemic with lung disease representing the main cause of morbidity and mortality. Conventional chest-X ray (CXR) and ultrasound (US) are valuable instruments to assess the extent of lung involvement. We investigated the relationship between CXR scores on admission and the level of medical care required in patients with COVID-19. Further, we assessed the CXR-US correlation to explore the role of ultrasound in monitoring the course of COVID-19 pneumonia. Clinical features and CXR scores were obtained at admission and correlated with the level of intensity of care required [high- (HIMC) versus low-intensity medical care (LIMC)]. In a subgroup of patients, US findings were correlated with clinical and radiographic parameters. On hospital admission, CXR global score was higher in HIMCs compared to LIMC. Smoking history, pO2 on admission, cardiovascular and oncologic diseases were independent predictors of HIMC. The US score was positively correlated with FiO2 while the correlation with CXR global score only trended towards significance. Our study identifies clinical and radiographic features that strongly correlate with higher levels of medical care. The role of lung ultrasound in this setting remains undetermined and needs to be explored in larger prospective studies.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL