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1.
Cancers (Basel) ; 14(15)2022 Jul 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1969099

ABSTRACT

The majority of publications regarding SARS-CoV-2 infections in adult patients with acute leukemia (AL) refer to hematological patients in general and are not focused on acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We herein report a review of the current literature on adult AL patients infected with SARS-CoV-2. Overall, SARS-CoV-2-associated mortality ranges from 20-52% in patients with adult AL. AML patients have a particularly high COVID-19-related mortality. Of note, most of the available data relate to the pre-vaccination era and to variants before Omicron. The impact of COVID-19 infections on AL treatment is rarely reported. Based on the few studies available, treatment delay does not appear to be associated with an increased risk of relapse, whereas therapy discontinuation was associated with worse outcomes in AML patients. Therefore, the current recommendations suggest delaying systemic AL treatment in SARS-CoV-2-positive patients until SARS-CoV-2 negativity, if immediate AL treatment is not required. It is recommended to offer vaccination to all AL patients; the reported antibody responses are around 80-96%. Seronegative patients should additionally receive prophylactic administration of anti-SARS-CoV-2 monoclonal antibodies. Patients with AL infected with SARS-CoV-2 should be treated early with antiviral therapy to prevent disease progression and enable the rapid elimination of the virus.

2.
Leuk Lymphoma ; 63(3): 664-671, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475656

ABSTRACT

The severity and mortality of COVID-19 and seasonal influenza were recently compared in the general population but not in patients with hematological malignancies. We analyzed the clinical courses of 79 patients with hematological malignancies and diagnosis of either SARS-CoV-2 (n = 29) or influenza A or B infections (n = 50) who were admitted or were already under treatment in the Department of Oncology, Hematology and Stem cell Transplantation at the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany, between 1 January 2012 and 31 January 2021. For COVID-19, we observed significantly higher rates of acute respiratory distress syndrome with 48% (14/29) compared to 14% (7/50) in the influenza group (p = 0.001) as well as a significantly higher virus-associated 90-day mortality (41% vs. 12%, p = 0.005). Based on our results, we conclude that infections with SARS-CoV-2 are more severe than influenza A or B in patients with hematological malignancies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hematologic Neoplasms , Influenza, Human , COVID-19/complications , Hematologic Neoplasms/complications , Hematologic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Hematologic Neoplasms/therapy , Humans , Influenza, Human/complications , Influenza, Human/diagnosis , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Seasons
3.
iScience ; 24(7): 102752, 2021 Jul 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275407

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a respiratory tract infection that can affect multiple organ systems. Predicting the severity and clinical outcome of individual patients is a major unmet clinical need that remains challenging due to intra- and inter-patient variability. Here, we longitudinally profiled and integrated more than 150 clinical, laboratory, and immunological parameters of 173 patients with mild to fatal COVID-19. Using systems biology, we detected progressive dysregulation of multiple parameters indicative of organ damage that correlated with disease severity, particularly affecting kidneys, hepatobiliary system, and immune landscape. By performing unsupervised clustering and trajectory analysis, we identified T and B cell depletion as early indicators of a complicated disease course. In addition, markers of hepatobiliary damage emerged as robust predictor of lethal outcome in critically ill patients. This allowed us to propose a novel clinical COVID-19 SeveriTy (COST) score that distinguishes complicated disease trajectories and predicts lethal outcome in critically ill patients.

4.
J Clin Med ; 10(11)2021 May 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1244046

ABSTRACT

In this study, we directly compared coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients hospitalized during the first (27 February-28 July 2020) and second (29 July-31 December 2020) wave of the pandemic at a large tertiary center in northern Germany. Patients who presented during the first (n = 174) and second (n = 331) wave did not differ in age (median [IQR], 59 years [46, 71] vs. 58 years [42, 73]; p = 0.82) or age-adjusted Charlson Comorbidity Index (median [IQR], 2 [1, 4] vs. 2 [0, 4]; p = 0.50). During the second wave, a higher proportion of patients were treated as outpatients (11% [n = 20] vs. 20% [n = 67]), fewer patients were admitted to the intensive care unit (43% [n = 75] vs. 29% [n = 96]), and duration of hospitalization was significantly shorter (median days [IQR], 14 [8, 34] vs. 11 [5, 19]; p < 0.001). However, in-hospital mortality was high throughout the pandemic and did not differ between the two periods (16% [n = 27] vs. 16% [n = 54]; p = 0.89). While novel treatment strategies and increased knowledge about the clinical management of COVID-19 may have resulted in a less severe disease course in some patients, in-hospital mortality remained unaltered at a high level. These findings highlight the unabated need for efforts to hamper severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2) transmission, to increase vaccination coverage, and to develop novel treatment strategies to prevent mortality and decrease morbidity.

5.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 5803, 2021 03 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1132102

ABSTRACT

While several studies have described the clinical course of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), direct comparisons with patients with seasonal influenza are scarce. We compared 166 patients with COVID-19 diagnosed between February 27 and June 14, 2020, and 255 patients with seasonal influenza diagnosed during the 2017-18 season at the same hospital to describe common features and differences in clinical characteristics and course of disease. Patients with COVID-19 were younger (median age [IQR], 59 [45-71] vs 66 [52-77]; P < 0001) and had fewer comorbidities at baseline with a lower mean overall age-adjusted Charlson Comorbidity Index (mean [SD], 3.0 [2.6] vs 4.0 [2.7]; P < 0.001) than patients with seasonal influenza. COVID-19 patients had a longer duration of hospitalization (mean [SD], 25.9 days [26.6 days] vs 17.2 days [21.0 days]; P = 0.002), a more frequent need for oxygen therapy (101 [60.8%] vs 103 [40.4%]; P < 0.001) and invasive ventilation (52 [31.3%] vs 32 [12.5%]; P < 0.001) and were more frequently admitted to the intensive care unit (70 [42.2%] vs 51 [20.0%]; P < 0.001) than seasonal influenza patients. Among immunocompromised patients, those in the COVID-19 group had a higher hospital mortality compared to those in the seasonal influenza group (13 [33.3%] vs 8 [11.6%], P = 0.01). In conclusion, we show that COVID-19 patients were younger and had fewer baseline comorbidities than seasonal influenza patients but were at increased risk for severe illness. The high mortality observed in immunocompromised COVID-19 patients emphasizes the importance of protecting these patient groups from SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Aged , Comorbidity , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Oncol Res Treat ; 43(6): 307-313, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-211348

ABSTRACT

With the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemia, routine clinical work was immediately, deeply, and sustainably impacted in Germany and worldwide. The infrastructure of almost all hospitals is currently redirected to provide a maximum of intensive care resources, including the necessary staff. In parallel, routine as well as emergency clinical care for all patients in need has to be secured. This challenge becomes particularly evident in cancer care. In order to maintain adequate oncological care at all levels of provision and to conduct especially curative and intensive treatments with a maximum of safety, continuous adaption of the oncology care system has to be ensured. Intensive communication with colleagues and patients is needed as is consequent expert networking and continuous reflection of the own developed strategies. In parallel, it is of high importance to actively avoid cessation of innovation in order not to endanger the continuous improvement in prognosis of cancer patients. This includes sustained conduction of clinical trials as well as ongoing translational research. Here, we describe measures taken at the University Cancer Center Hamburg (UCCH) - a recognized comprehensive oncology center of excellence - during the COVID-19 crisis. We aim to provide support and potential perspectives to generate a discussion basis on how to maintain high-end cancer care during such a crisis and how to conduct patients safely into the future.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Cancer Care Facilities/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Hospitals, University/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Ambulatory Care , COVID-19 , Cancer Care Facilities/economics , Coronavirus Infections/economics , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Germany , Hospitals, University/economics , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Inpatients , Pandemics/economics , Patient Safety , Pneumonia, Viral/economics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
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