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GMS J Med Educ ; 38(4): Doc81, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1523662

ABSTRACT

Background: Due to the pandemic-related restrictions in classroom teaching at the medical faculties of the LMU Munich and the University of Basel, teaching methods with standardized patients (SPs), were shifted to a digital, web-based format at short notice as of April 2020. We report on our experiences with the WebEncounter program, which was used for the first time in German-speaking countries. The program enables one-to-one encounters between SPs and students. Students receive an invitational email with brief instructions and background information on the case. SPs use case-specific criteria that are compliant with the learning objectives for digital evaluation during the encounter. A feedback session takes place immediately following the encounter. The SPs address the didactically relevant sections and can illustrate them with the corresponding video sequences. Finally, the students receive the links to the video recordings of the encounter and the feedback unit by email. Project description: The aim of this pilot study was to analyze the practicability of the program and its acceptance by students and SPs. In addition, we examined whether the operationalization of the learning objectives in the form of assessment items has an impact on the content and thematic development of courses in the area of doctor-patient communication. Methods: To implement the program, patient cases previously tested in communication seminars in Munich and Basel were rewritten and case-specific evaluation criteria were developed. SPs were trained to use the program, to present their patient figure online and to give feedback. The experience of those involved (faculty, SPs and SP trainers, students) in implementing the program was documented at various levels. The frequency and causes of technical problems were described. Student results on the patient cases and on the feedback items were collected quantitatively and, where possible, supplemented by free-text statements. Results: Data from 218/220 students in Basel and 120/127 students in Munich were collected and evaluated. Students were very satisfied with the patient cases, the encounter with the SPs and their feedback: 3.81±0.42. SPs experienced the training as an increase in their competence and the structured feedback as particularly positive. The training effort per SP was between 2.5 and 4 hours. The results show predominantly normally-distributed, case-specific sum scores of the evaluation criteria. The analysis of the individual assessment items refers to learning objectives that students find difficult to achieve (e.g. explicitly structuring the conversation). Problems in the technical implementation (<10 percent of the encounters) were due mainly to the use of insufficient hardware or internet connection problems. The need to define case-specific evaluation criteria triggered a discussion in the group of study directors about learning objectives and their operationalization. Summary: Web-based encounters can be built into the ongoing communication curriculum with reasonable effort. Training the SPs and heeding the technical requirements are of central importance. Practicing the virtual consultation was evaluated very positively by the students - in particular, the immediate feedback in the protected dialogue was appreciated by all involved.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communication , Physician-Patient Relations , Remote Consultation , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Feedback , Germany , Humans , Internet , Pilot Projects , Remote Consultation/standards , Switzerland
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GMS J Med Educ ; 38(6): Doc110, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1435941

ABSTRACT

Objective: To avert staff shortages during the first wave of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic in spring 2020, the medical faculties of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich (LMU) appealed to their students to volunteer for relief work. In this study, we examine the influence of psychological factors on the students' decisions to respond to this call or not. Methodology: We report on a cross-sectional study based on an online survey among medical students at the TUM and LMU. The survey consisted of a questionnaire containing items on motivation and other factors related to the decision for or against volunteering. Questions were also asked about anxieties regarding COVID-19 and the occurrence of depressive symptoms, as well as about resilience. Results: Responses from 244 participants were analysed. Students' decisions to volunteer revealed both altruistic and introjected motivations. For those students who did not volunteer, time overlaps and workload related to other activities played an important role. Between the two groups, no significant difference was detected in terms of their resilience and COVID-19-related anxieties. However, the non-volunteering students reported a significantly higher prevalence of depressive symptoms. Conclusion: Sense of duty and the desire to help were, according to the students, the most important reasons for volunteering. Depressive symptoms and lack of time made volunteering less likely. Resilience and COVID-19-related anxieties do not seem to have had any influence on the decision to volunteer or not.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Cross-Sectional Studies , Germany , Humans , Students, Medical/psychology , Volunteers/psychology
4.
GMS J Med Educ ; 38(1): Doc3, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1110225

ABSTRACT

Introduction: In 2014, a newly designed, case-based seminar was successfully implemented in the subjects of health systems, health economics and public health care (GGG). The seminar "The Lonely Patient" is based on a real patient case and deals with the German health care system from the perspective of a patient. In order to create more space for discussion and exchange among students, the seminar was redesigned on the basis of the Inverted Classroom Method (ICM). Project description: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, new, purely digital teaching formats had to be developed quickly in the sense of Emergency Remote Teaching. Therefore, the Inverted Classroom concept of the seminar was transformed into an online ICM. In order to promote active learning based on the ICAP model (Interactive, Constructive, Active, Passive), the online face-to-face part was designed as a synchronous interactive learner-centered course using the gamified audience response system Kahoot! Results: Evaluation results to date and feedback rounds with students indicate that the online ICM-version of the seminar leads to at least as good evaluation results as the previous face-to-face course. In particular, the students positively emphasize the use of Kahoot! as an activating digital medium. Discussion: Through the use of the ICM and the gamified audience response system Kahoot!, students could be activated in meaningful ways. The resulting discussions about the patient case and teaching content of the quiz questions in the synchronous online course could be implemented just as well as in the classroom-based course of previous semesters. Conclusion: The application of the online ICM, along with the consideration of the ICAP Model, has led to the successful implementation of a digital course within the context of the increased difficulty surrounding the emergency remote teaching. Additionally, students' learning success has remained at a similar level as during traditional classroom-based courses of previous semesters.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Peer Group , Problem-Based Learning/organization & administration , Teaching/organization & administration , Humans , Motivation , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
5.
GMS J Med Educ ; 37(7): Doc99, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-971676

ABSTRACT

Objective: COVID-19 challenges curriculum managers worldwide to create digital substitutes for classroom teaching. Case-based teaching formats under expert supervision can be used as a substitute for practical bedside teaching, where the focus is on teaching clinical reasoning skills. Methods: For medical students of LMU and TU Munich, the interactive, case-based, and supervised teaching format of Clinical Case Discussion (CCD) was digitised and implemented as dCCD in their respective curricula. Case discussions were realised as videoconferences, led by a student moderator, and took place under the supervision of a board-certified clinician. To prevent passive participation, additional cognitive activations were implemented. Acceptance, usability, and subjective learning outcomes were assessed in dCCDs by means of a special evaluation concept. Results: With regard to acceptance, students were of the opinion that they had learned effectively by participating in dCCDs (M=4.31; SD=1.37). The majority of students also stated that they would recommend the course to others (M=4.23; SD=1.62). The technical implementation of the teaching format was judged positively overall, but findings for usability were heterogeneous. Students rated their clinical reasoning skills at the end of the dCCDs (M=4.43; SD=0.66) as being significantly higher than at the beginning (M=4.33; SD=0.69), with low effect size, t(181)=-2.352, p=.020, d=0.15. Conclusion: Our evaluation data shows that the dCCD format is well-accepted by students as a substitute for face-to-face teaching. In the next step, we plan to examine the extent to which participation in dCCDs leads to an increase in objectively measured clinical reasoning skills, analogous to a face-to-face CCD with on-site attendance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Decision-Making/methods , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Videoconferencing/organization & administration , Clinical Competence , Education, Distance/standards , Education, Medical/standards , Educational Measurement , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Medical/psychology , Videoconferencing/standards
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