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1.
Revista Ciencias de la Salud ; 20(3):1-14, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2056416

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The pandemic has brought about social changes, which may have affected mental health. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of and associations between anxiety, depression, and stress among Peruvian university students during the covid-19 pandemic. Materials and Methods: This was an analytical, multi-centered, cross-sectional study conducted with 2,572 university students from 16 Peruvian cities. Depression, anxiety, and stress diagnoses were obtained with the dass-21 scale (stress alpha: 0.85;anxiety alpha: 0.84;and depression alpha: 0.87). The values were crossed with significant social and educational variables. Results: Anxiety was the most common condition (extremely severe in 4%, severe in 3%, and moderate in 10%). Whereas stress and depression were not associated with the course of studies (p > 0.330 and p > 0.440, respectively), anxiety was lower among students pursuing health-related degrees (p = 0.011). Women showed higher levels of stress (p = 0.040) and anxiety (p = 0.017). Older participants had relatively lower stress (p = 0.002), depression (p = 0.006), and anxiety (p = 0.044) levels. Third-year students had higher depression levels than first-year students (p = 0.011). Conclusions: Significant prevalence levels and associations were identified for the three conditions, which should be monitored to determine their current status, given the possible future occurrence of panic attacks or post-traumatic stress, among other complications. © 2022, Universidad del Rosario. All rights reserved.

2.
Boletin de Malariologia y Salud Ambiental ; 61(Edicion Especial II 2021):139-147, 2021.
Article in Spanish | GIM | ID: covidwho-2040741

ABSTRACT

Having been previously infected does not guarantee that one is safe in this pandemic, therefore, it is important to estimate the change in perceptions. The aim was to determine the fatalistic perception of patients recovered from COVID-19 in Peru and to identify the sociodemographic differences that influence the fatalistic perception of recovered and uninfected patients. Observational, retrospective cohort. The exposure variable was whether the patient had already been infected by COVID-19, the dependent variable was the fatalistic perception in the event of becoming ill with COVID-19 (in the case of those who had already been ill, the question was asked in the event of reinfection);this was measured with a validated test and being fatalistic was defined as those who were in the upper third of the scores;analytical statistics were obtained. Of the 8957 respondents, 37% reported that they had already been infected by COVID-19. In bivariate analysis, there was no difference in fatalism according to having been previously infected (p=0.426). In multivariate analysis, there was a lower risk of fatalism among men (aRR: 0.85;95%CI: 0.80-0.90;p-value<0.001), but an increased risk among those who believed they could be reinfected (aRR: 1.39;95%CI: 1.23-1.56;p-value<0.001), adjusted for three variables. Un conclusion, there is no association between fatalistic perception of the pandemic and having been infected with COVID-19 in Peru. However, being a woman and believing in a possible reinfection were risk factors for presenting fatalistic ideas.

3.
Boletin de Malariologia y Salud Ambiental ; 61(Edicion Especial II 2021):61-69, 2021.
Article in Spanish | GIM | ID: covidwho-2040736

ABSTRACT

Knowledge is key to face any disease, but there are few baseline studies from the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. The objective was to determine the association between being a vulnerable population and the low knowledge of the population in 17 Peruvian cities at the beginning of the pandemic. Knowledge was measured using a nine-question scale, which asks about the mechanism, symptoms and consequences;this was crosschecked against socio-demographic variables using analytical statistics. Of the 3913 respondents, the lowest knowledge was about how to react to cold symptoms and what treatment a person with an initial non-severe coronavirus infection should follow (37% and 53% correct answers;respectively). In the multivariate analysis, those who had lower percentages of a poor level of knowledge of the disease were those with higher education (aPR: 0.74;95%CI: 0.62-0.88;p-value=0.001), among those with some postgraduate studies (aPR: 0.59;95%CI: 0.43-0.68;p-value < 0.001), among those who were part of the health personnel (aPR: 0.15;95%CI: 0.05-0.46;p-value=0.001) and among women (aPR: 0.84;95%CI: 0.73-0.96;p-value=0.009), on the other hand, the older the age, the worse the level of knowledge of the disease (aPR: 1.012;95%CI: 1.005-1.018;p-value=0.001), adjusted by 4 variables. There was a low level of knowledge in some aspects and this is associated with some specific characteristics according to being considered a vulnerable population.

4.
Boletin de Malariologia y Salud Ambiental ; 61:61-69, 2021.
Article in Spanish | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1395885

ABSTRACT

Knowledge is key to face any disease, but there are few baseline studies from the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. The objective was to determine the association between being a vulnerable population and the low knowledge of the population in 17 Peruvian cities at the beginning of the pandemic. Knowledge was measured using a nine-question scale, which asks about the mechanism, symptoms and consequences;this was crosschecked against socio-demographic variables using analytical statistics. Of the 3913 respondents, the lowest knowledge was about how to react to cold symptoms and what treatment a person with an initial non-severe coronavirus infection should follow (37% and 53% correct answers;respectively). In the multivariate analysis, those who had lower percentages of a poor level of knowledge of the disease were those with higher education (aPR: 0.74;95%CI: 0.62-0.88;p-value=0.001), among those with some postgraduate studies (aPR: 0.59;95%CI: 0.43-0.68;p-value<0.001), among those who were part of the health personnel (aPR: 0.15;95%CI: 0.05-0.46;p-value=0.001) and among women (aPR: 0.84;95%CI: 0.73-0.96;p-value=0.009), on the other hand, the older the age, the worse the level of knowledge of the disease (aPR: 1.012;95%CI: 1.005-1.018;p-value=0.001), adjusted by 4 variables. There was a low level of knowledge in some aspects and this is associated with some specific characteristics according to being considered a vulnerable population. © 2021 Instituto de Altos Estudios de Salud Publica. All rights reserved.

5.
Electronic Journal of General Medicine ; 18(5), 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1305018

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Since the announcement of the start of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines development, many myths and vaccine opponents have come to the fore. Therefore, in this scenario, it is imperative to have an instrument to assess the population perception of this subject matter. Objective: To validate a scale to measure the perception of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines acceptance. Methods: This is an instrumental and multicentre study, through which a list of possible reasons for whether or not people would be vaccinated was generated. After submitting them to 15 experts, a pilot survey was conducted virtually in a population of almost 3000 participants in the 24 regions of Peru. Descriptive statistics and the exploratory factor analysis (EFA) were conducted using the FACTOR program. Results: The Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin (KMO) coefficient (KMO = 0.917) and the Bartlett’s test of sphericity (3343.3;gl = 136;p <0.001) were conducted. According to EFA results, two factors were found to explain 58.17% of the total variance. The fit indices show that the proposed model is adequate (χ2 = 826.321;df = 43;p = 0.001;RMR = 0.054;GFI = 0.952;AGFI = 0.927;CFI = 0.946;TLI = 0.931;and RMSEA = 0.078). Finally, Cronbach’s α was found to be very satisfactory for the generated scale (α = 0.831;95% CI = 0.82 – 0.84). Conclusion: A simple and efficient scale was validated to assess positive and negative perceptions of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines (the VAC-COVID-19 scale), with a Cronbach’s coefficient of 0.831. © 2021 by Author/s and Licensed by Modestum.

6.
Electronic Journal of General Medicine ; 18(2):1-6, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1215869

ABSTRACT

Objective: To determine the perception of possible infection caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) and associated complications according to the labor sector in Peru. Methods: We performed an observational, cross sectional, and secondary data analysis. The study had three dependent variables that were obtained from a locally validated questionnaire, in which it is asked whether the professionals had the perception that they could be infected with SARS-CoV-2 at work, or could transmit the virus to their family/friends, and regarding the possibility of complications related to the infection. Results: Of the 2843 workers participating in the study, those in the health sector perceived that they were more likely to be infected at work. In the multivariate analysis, adjusted for four variables, health sector workers also perceived that they could be infected more frequently at work (adjusted prevalence ratio (aPR): 1.74;95% confidence interval (CI): 1.40-2.15;p <0.001). These professionals, moreover, perceived that they could transmit the virus to their family/friends (aPR: 0.76;95% CI: 0.63-0.92;p = 0.005) or that there would be complications resulting from the infection (aPR: 0.59;95% CI: 0.48-0.73;p <0.001). On the other hand, engineering sector workers were the ones who had a greater perception that they could infect their family/friends (aPR: 1.95;95% CI: 1.20-3.20;p = 0.007), while workers from other sectors perceived that they could have more chances of complications from the infection (aPR: 1.17;95% CI: 1.05-1.30;p = 0.006). Conclusion: The health sector may be the most vulnerable in this context, which is why occupational health teams should develop and implement specific surveillance plans to prevent and reduce the number of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases among healthcare workers.

7.
coronavirus disease 2019 editorial human telemedicine ; 2021(Revista de la Facultad de Medicina Humana)
Article in English | WHO COVID | ID: covidwho-1187240
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