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1.
J Glob Health ; 13: 06022, 2023 May 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20234959

ABSTRACT

Background: The workload burden of the COVID-19 pandemic on health systems requires not only financial support but also long-term and contextualized policies. We assessed the work motivation and its determinants among health workers at Vietnamese hospitals and facilities during the prolonged COVID-19 outbreaks in 2021. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 2814 health care professionals across all three regions of Vietnam from October to November 2021. An online questionnaire, including the Work Motivation Scale, distributed by the snowball method to a subgroup of 939 respondents, investigated changes in working characteristics due to COVID-19, work motivation, and occupational intention. Results: Only 37.2% of respondents committed to their current job and about 40% reported a decrease in their job satisfaction. The Work Motivation Scale scored the lowest in "financial motivation" and the highest in "perception of work value". Participants who were in the north region, of younger age, unmarried, and who had a low level of adaptability to external work pressure, shorter experience, and less job satisfaction tended to be less motivated and committed to their current job. Conclusions: Intrinsic motivation has increased in importance during the pandemic. Therefore, policymakers should develop interventions that raise intrinsic, psychological motivation instead of only focusing on salary raises. Issues about intrinsic motivations of health care workers such as low adaptability to stress and professionalism in routine work should be prioritized during the pandemic preparedness and control.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Motivation , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Vietnam/epidemiology , Pandemics , Southeast Asian People , Health Personnel/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
BMC Med Educ ; 23(1): 387, 2023 May 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20234958

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUNDS: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in not only significant mortalities in Vietnam but has had an impact on its economy. Previous studies have highlighted how the pandemic has had a marginal impact on Vietnamese healthcare workers working at the frontlines. To date, there have been several other studies examining the impact of COVID-19 on intentions to transition between jobs among healthcare professionals, but this has yet to be explored amongst Vietnamese healthcare workers. METHODS: To achieve the study's objectives an online cross-sectional study was conducted between September to November 2021. Snowball sampling methodology was adopted for the recruitment of participants. The questionnaire that was used for this study comprised of the following sections: (a) socio-demographic information; (b) impact of COVID-19 on work; (c) risk of exposure to COVID-19; (d) career choices/intentions to change job, and (e) motivation at work. RESULTS: There were 5727 completed the entire survey. 17.2% of the respondents have had increased job satisfaction, 26.4% reported increased motivation to work, and 40.9% reported decreased motivation to work. Whilst there were changes in the daily work intensity and the level of work-related stress, more than 60% of respondents we sampled did not intend to switch careers. Demographic variables like gender, whether one was a student or an existing healthcare worker, and income related to work motivation. The community's stigma was a negative factor that declined intrinsic motivation as well as decreased work retention. CONCLUSIONS: Our study is instrumental in identifying the impact of COVID-19 on career choices amongst Vietnamese healthcare workers. The factors identified have clear implications for policymaking.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Attitude of Health Personnel , Career Choice , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Health Personnel
3.
JAMA Netw Open ; 6(5): e2314838, 2023 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20244794

ABSTRACT

Importance: Despite the COVID-19 pandemic's effect on daily life, limited research exists on the prevalence and risk factors of suicidality and sadness among South Korean adolescents. Objectives: To examine whether the observed sadness and suicidality in the early to middle periods of the COVID-19 pandemic differed from the expected level and to investigate changes in risk factors for sadness and suicidality. Design, Setting, and Participants: This nationwide serial cross-sectional survey study used data on 1 109 776 Korean adolescents aged 13 to 18 years from the Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey from 2005 to 2021. Exposure: The COVID-19 pandemic. Main Outcomes and Measures: The pattern of changes in the percentage or proportion of sadness or suicidality, as well as the risk factors for sadness or suicidality. The transitional effect of the COVID-19 pandemic was assessed using weighted odds ratios (wORs) or weighted beta coefficients with 95% CIs. Results: Between 2005 and 2021, 1 109 776 adolescents (mean [SD] age, 15.0 [1.7] years; 51.5% male adolescents; and 51.7% in grades 7-9 and 48.3% in grades 10-12) were included in the Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey. The slope of the long-term trends in sadness and suicidality decreased in the prepandemic period (sadness: from 37.8% [95% CI, 37.4%-38.2%] in 2005-2007 to 26.1% [95% CI, 25.9%-26.4%] in 2016-2019; suicidality: from 23.0% [95% CI, 22.7%-23.3%] in 2005-2007 to 12.3% [95% CI, 12.1%-12.5%] in 2016-2019), whereas the slope increased during the COVID-19 pandemic (sadness: from 25.0% [95% CI, 24.5%-25.6%] in 2020 to 26.6% [95% CI, 26.1%-27.1%] in 2021; trend difference in ß, 0.249 [95% CI, 0.236-0.262]; suicidality: from 10.7% [95% CI, 10.3%-11.1%] in 2020 to 12.5% [95% CI, 12.1%-12.9%] in 2021; trend difference in ß, 0.328 [95% CI, 0.312-0.344]). The trends presented a similar tendency in the subgroups according to sex, school grade, residential area, smoking status, and current alcohol use. Compared with the prepandemic period, the risk factors associated with sadness during the pandemic were younger age (wOR, 0.907; 95% CI, 0.881-0.933), female sex (wOR, 1.031; 95% CI, 1.001-1.062), urban residence (wOR, 1.120; 95% CI, 1.087-1.153), current smoking status (wOR, 1.134; 95% CI, 1.059-1.216), and current alcohol use (wOR, 1.051; 95% CI, 1.002-1.102). Female sex (wOR, 1.064; 95% CI, 1.021-1.109), urban residence (wOR, 1.117; 95% CI, 1.074-1.162), and low economic status (wOR, 1.286; 95% CI, 1.180-1.403) were the risk factors significantly associated with suicidality after the COVID-19 pandemic began. Conclusions and Relevance: In this nationwide serial cross-sectional survey study of South Korean adolescents, the slope of the prevalence of sadness and suicidality increased during the COVID-19 pandemic after a decrease prior to the pandemic. The findings suggest that public health measures are needed to recognize vulnerable groups with risk factors and to prevent an increase in sadness and suicidality among adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Suicide , Humans , Adolescent , Female , Male , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Sadness , Risk Factors , Republic of Korea/epidemiology
4.
J Glob Health ; 13: 04033, 2023 May 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20243915

ABSTRACT

Background: The latent monkeypox outbreak has become the most emergent public health challenge globally. This study was conducted to assess the acceptability, and willingness to take and pay for a hypothetical Monkeypox vaccine among the Vietnamese general public as well as investigate preference for individual vaccine attributes. Methods: An online cross-sectional study was conducted using snowball sampling among 842 respondents in Vietnam in 2022. A Discrete choice experiment (DCE) on preference for six major attributes of vaccine: effectiveness, immunity duration, side effects, mortality rate, restriction, and the cost was applied. Results: Fear of the impact of monkeypox on public health and the economy, vaccine service satisfaction and responsibility to the community were the most weighted factors in the decision to take a hypothetical monkeypox vaccine. Two-thirds of participants were willing to take the vaccine, while insufficient information on monkeypox and the vaccine were the main reasons for vaccine hesitancy. For vaccine attributes, the mortality rate after seven days of vaccination was the most weighted while cost was the least influential attribute. Factors associated with willingness to take and to pay for the monkeypox vaccine included knowledge of transmission, geographical location, service satisfaction, and risk of infection, while financial burden and fear of vaccine were major drivers of hesitancy. Conclusion: Our findings underline an urgent need for effective information dissemination through social media and counseling. The implementation of nationwide monkeypox vaccination requires prioritization and support for high-risk groups as well as consideration for the country's financial resources.


Subject(s)
Monkeypox , Smallpox Vaccine , Vaccines , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Global Health
5.
Psychol Med ; : 1-10, 2021 Aug 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2295115

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: It remains unknown whether coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients with bipolar disorders (BDs) are at an increased risk of mortality. We aimed to establish whether health outcomes and care differed between patients infected with COVID-19 with BD and patients without a diagnosis of severe mental illness. METHODS: We conducted a population-based cohort study of all patients with identified COVID-19 and respiratory symptoms who were hospitalized in France between February and June 2020. The outcomes were in-hospital mortality and intensive care unit (ICU) admission. We used propensity score matching to control for confounding factors. RESULTS: In total, 50 407 patients were included, of whom 480 were patients with BD. Patients with BD were 2 years older, more frequently women and had more comorbidities than controls without a diagnosis of severe mental illness. Patients with BD had an increased in-hospital mortality rate (26.6% v. 21.9%; p = 0.034) and similar ICU admission rate (27.9% v. 28.4%, p = 0.799), as confirmed by propensity analysis [odds ratio, 95% confidence interval (OR, 95% CI) for mortality: 1.30 (1.16-1.45), p < 0.0001]. Significant interactions between BD and age and between BD and social deprivation were found, highlighting that the most important inequalities in mortality were observed in the youngest [OR, 95% CI 2.28 (1.18-4.41), p = 0.0015] and most deprived patients with BD [OR, 95% CI 1.60 (1.33-1.92), p < 0.001]. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 patients with BD were at an increased risk of mortality, which was exacerbated in the youngest and most deprived patients with BD. Patients with BD should thus be targeted as a high-risk population for severe forms of COVID-19, requiring enhanced preventive and disease management strategies.

6.
Frontiers in public health ; 11, 2023.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2294339

ABSTRACT

Objectives The onset of COVID-19 has resulted in both morbidity and mortality. It also has a consequential impact on the Vietnamese economy. Prior studies have examined the impact of COVID-19 on healthcare professionals' career decisions. However, no study remains to have examined the work conditions and career choices in a general Vietnamese population. Our study aims to identify factors associated with the change in work conditions and career choices in general Vietnamese population. Methods An online cross-sectional study between September 2021 through to November 2021 (during the Omicron COVID-19 pandemic). Snowball sampling method was utilized in recruiting the participants. The questionnaire used in this study included the following questions: (a) Socio-demographic information;(b) impact of COVID-19 on personal habits/daily expenses;(c) Current nature of work and impact of COVID-19 on work;(d) Impact of COVID-19 on career decisions. Data analysis was performed using STATA version 16. Descriptive analysis followed by Ordered logit regression was performed, to identify potential covariates. Results Six hundred and fifty participants were recruited, of which only 645 completed the survey. The completion rate was 99.2%. This study demonstrated the impact that COVID-19 has on finances, as only 32% of those sampled reported that they were able to pay in full. 46.6% of the respondents have had a decrease in their overall household income. With regards to their employment and work characteristics, 41.0% reported a decrease in their work satisfaction and 39.0% reported having reduced motivation for work. Females were less likely to consider transiting from their current job to another field than male participants. Respondents who were married, had a higher level of commitment to their current job, and lower inclination to transition to another field. Respondents experiencing financial difficulties were more likely to consider a transition to another field/work. Conclusion This is perhaps one of the first studies to have examined the impact of COVID-19 on work intentions regarding career choices and transitions in the general Vietnamese population. Future financial policies must take into consideration these factors.

7.
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci ; 2022 Aug 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2259376

ABSTRACT

Severe mental disorders have been associated with increased COVID-19 mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of the vaccination campaign against COVID-19 after 1 year using exhaustive population-based data. In this nationwide population-based study, we used data from the French national medico-administrative database (SNDS) and the COVID Vaccine teleservice from January 4, 2021 (date of activation of the teleservice) to January 30th, 2022. As of January 30th, 2022, the rate of first injection in France was 80.2% (54 million people) and the rate of booster vaccination was 78.3% (52.7 million people). Except for opioid use disorder, all individuals with chronic illnesses or risk factors for poor COVID-19 outcome (e.g., smoking and obesity) had higher rates of vaccination than the general population (from 83.4 to 94.5% vs. 78.3%). However, the four diseases ranking last for both initial and booster vaccinations were mental disorders: alcohol use disorders (86 and 84.3%), neurodevelopmental psychiatric disorders (85.3 and 83.7%), schizophrenia-spectrum disorder (85 and 83.4%) and opioid use disorders (72.9 and 69.4%). Except for opioid disorders, all patients with mental disorders had higher rates of vaccination compared to the general population. However, these rates were lower than other chronic diseases at risk of severe COVID-19 outcomes. Vaccination campaigns must redouble their efforts to improve vaccination penetration in patients with mental disorders.

8.
World J Pediatr ; 2023 Mar 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2275688

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although previous studies have provided data on early pandemic periods of alcohol and substance use in adolescents, more adequate studies are needed to predict the trends of alcohol and substance use during recent periods, including the mid-pandemic period. This study investigated the changes in alcohol and substance use, except tobacco use, throughout the pre-, early-, and mid-pandemic periods in adolescents using a nationwide serial cross-sectional survey from South Korea. METHODS: Data on 1,109,776 Korean adolescents aged 13-18 years from 2005 to 2021 were obtained in a survey operated by the Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency. We evaluated adolescents' alcohol and substance consumption prevalence and compared the slope of alcohol and substance prevalence before and during the COVID-19 pandemic to see the trend changes. We define the pre-COVID-19 period as consisting of four groups of consecutive years (2005-2008, 2009-2012, 2013-2015, and 2016-2019). The COVID-19 pandemic period is composed of 2020 (early-pandemic era) and 2021 (mid-pandemic era). RESULTS: More than a million adolescents successfully met the inclusion criteria. The weighted prevalence of current alcohol use was 26.8% [95% confidence interval (CI) 26.4-27.1] from 2005 to 2008 and 10.5% (95% CI 10.1-11.0) in 2020 and 2021. The weighted prevalence of substance use was 1.1% (95% CI 1.1-1.2) from 2005 to 2008 and 0.7% (95% CI 0.6-0.7) between 2020 and 2021. From 2005 to 2021, the overall trend of use of both alcohol and drugs was found to decrease, but the decline has slowed since COVID-19 epidemic (current alcohol use: ßdiff 0.167; 95% CI 0.150-0.184; substance use: ßdiff 0.152; 95% CI 0.110-0.194). The changes in the slope of current alcohol and substance use showed a consistent slowdown with regard to sex, grade, residence area, and smoking status from 2005 to 2021. CONCLUSION: The overall prevalence of alcohol consumption and substance use among over one million Korean adolescents from the early and mid-stage (2020-2021) of the COVID-19 pandemic showed a slower decline than expected given the increase during the prepandemic period (2005-2019).

9.
Sci Rep ; 13(1): 4460, 2023 03 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2284433

ABSTRACT

Post-COVID-19 symptoms have become a significant global health concern. This study focused on assessing the prevalence, severity, and care preference of post-COVID-19 symptoms, as well as identifying determinants to inform evidence-based policy on post-COVID-19 in Vietnam. A national cross-sectional study was conducted in May 2022 among 12,361 recovered COVID-19 patients, providing the largest dataset on health status after COVID-19 in Vietnam. The study utilized ordered logistic, Poisson regression, Multilevel linear random-effects models, and Multilevel random effects ordered logistic model to identify factors associated with various aspects of post-COVID-19 conditions. Results showed that the average number of post-COVID-19 symptoms was approximately 3, with fatigue and headache being the most common symptoms. The number of post-COVID-19 symptoms varied by province, decreased with age, and was significantly correlated with the duration of infection. Age, infection period, underlying conditions, telehealth utilization, and geographical location were identified as significant determinants of post-COVID-19 symptoms. The study concluded that improving resource allocation and health-seeking behavior in underserved areas could help address differences in health outcomes and improve post-COVID-19 control in Vietnam.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Vietnam/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Southeast Asian People , Headache
10.
J Clin Med ; 12(5)2023 Feb 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2255369

ABSTRACT

Burnout is frequent among healthcare workers, and sleep problems are suspected risk factors. The sleep health framework provides a new approach to the promotion of sleep as a health benefit. The aim of this study was to assess good sleep health in a large sample of healthcare workers and to investigate its relationship with the absence of burnout among healthcare workers while considering anxiety and depressive symptoms. A cross-sectional Internet-based survey of French healthcare workers was conducted in summer 2020, at the end of the first COVID-19 lockdown in France (March to May 2020). Sleep health was assessed using the RU-SATED v2.0 scale (RegUlarity, Satisfaction, Alertness, Timing, Efficiency, Duration). Emotional exhaustion was used as a proxy for overall burnout. Of 1069 participating French healthcare workers, 474 (44.3%) reported good sleep health (RU-SATED > 8) and 143 (13.4%) reported emotional exhaustion. Males and nurses had a lower likelihood of emotional exhaustion than females and physicians, respectively. Good sleep health was associated with a 2.5-fold lower likelihood of emotional exhaustion and associations persisted among healthcare workers without significant anxiety and depressive symptoms. Longitudinal studies are needed to explore the preventive role of sleep health promotion in terms of the reduction in burnout risk.

11.
Curr Opin Psychiatry ; 36(3): 179-183, 2023 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2240748

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Multiple countries have reported increased COVID-19 mortality in patients with schizophrenia. The purpose of this review was to synthetize the consequences of the pandemic on patients with schizophrenia including vaccination data. RECENT FINDINGS: We have synthetized data on the increased risk of infection and increased mortality, the impact of the pandemic and lockdowns on psychiatric care, vaccination policies, unwillingness to vaccine in patients and the rates of vaccination. SUMMARY: Schizophrenia has been confirmed at increased risk of both COVID-19 infection and developing a severe/lethal form of the infection. Patients with schizophrenia should, therefore, be prioritized for vaccination whenever possible and should be prioritized for psychiatric and somatic care access. Psychotic symptomatology may be a barrier to vaccination in some patients, and heterogenous vaccination rates were identified in national databases. The COVID-19 pandemic has been also a unique opportunity to develop telehealth. A mixed face-to-face and distance model should be encouraged, whenever possible, to improve the experience of patients, relatives and healthcare professionals. No major change of long-acting antipsychotics has been reported in most countries, and there was no consistent evidence for clozapine prescription to increase the risk of COVID-19 infection or severe outcomes.


Subject(s)
Antipsychotic Agents , COVID-19 , Schizophrenia , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Schizophrenia/drug therapy , Antipsychotic Agents/therapeutic use
12.
World J Pediatr ; 19(4): 366-377, 2023 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2175145

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although smoking is classified as a risk factor for severe COVID-19 outcomes, there is a scarcity of studies on prevalence of smoking during the COVID-19 pandemic. Thus, this study aims to analyze the trends of prevalence of smoking in adolescents over the COVID-19 pandemic period. METHODS: The present study used data from middle to high school adolescents between 2005 and 2021 who participated in the Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey (KYRBS). We evaluated the smoking prevalence (ever or daily) by year groups and estimated the slope in smoking prevalence before and during the pandemic. RESULTS: A total of 1,137,823 adolescents participated in the study [mean age, 15.04 years [95% confidence interval (CI) 15.03-15.06]; and male, 52.4% (95% CI 51.7-53.1)]. The prevalence of ever smokers was 27.7% (95% CI 27.3-28.1) between 2005 and 2008 but decreased to 9.8% (95% CI 9.3-10.3) in 2021. A consistent trend was found in daily smokers, as the estimates decreased from 5.4% (95% CI 5.2-5.6) between 2005 and 2008 to 2.3% (95% CI 2.1-2.5) in 2021. However, the downward slope in the overall prevalence of ever smokers and daily smokers became less pronounced in the COVID-19 pandemic period than in the pre-pandemic period. In the subgroup with substance use, the decreasing slope in daily smokers was significantly more pronounced during the pandemic than during the pre-pandemic period. CONCLUSIONS: The proportion of ever smokers and daily smokers showed a less pronounced decreasing trend during the pandemic. The findings of our study provide an overall understanding of the pandemic's impact on smoking prevalence in adolescents. Supplementary file2 (MP4 64897 KB).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adolescent , Humans , Male , Prevalence , COVID-19/epidemiology , Smoking/epidemiology , Risk Factors
13.
Mol Psychiatry ; 2022 Oct 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2062186

ABSTRACT

It remains unknown to what degree resource prioritization toward SARS-CoV-2 (2019-nCoV) coronavirus (COVID-19) cases had disrupted usual acute care for non-COVID-19 patients, especially in the most vulnerable populations such as patients with schizophrenia. The objective was to establish whether the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on non-COVID-19 hospital mortality and access to hospital care differed between patients with schizophrenia versus without severe mental disorder. We conducted a nationwide population-based cohort study of all non-COVID-19 acute hospitalizations in the pre-COVID-19 (March 1, 2019 through December 31, 2019) and COVID-19 (March 1, 2020 through December 31, 2020) periods in France. We divided the population into patients with schizophrenia and age/sex-matched patients without severe mental disorder (1:10). Using a difference-in-differences approach, we performed multivariate patient-level logistic regression models (adjusted odds ratio, aOR) with adjustment for complementary health insurance, smoking, alcohol and substance addiction, Charlson comorbidity score, origin of the patient, category of care, intensive care unit (ICU) care, major diagnosis groups and hospital characteristics. A total of 198,186 patients with schizophrenia were matched with 1,981,860 controls. The 90-day hospital mortality in patients with schizophrenia increased significantly more versus controls (aOR = 1.18; p < 0.001). This increased mortality was found for poisoning and injury (aOR = 1.26; p = 0.033), respiratory diseases (aOR = 1.19; p = 0.008) and for both surgery (aOR = 1.26; p = 0.008) and medical care settings (aOR = 1.16; p = 0.001). Significant changes in the case mix were noted with reduced admission in the ICU and for several somatic diseases including cancer, circulatory and digestive diseases and stroke for patients with schizophrenia compared to controls. These results suggest a greater deterioration in access to, effectiveness and safety of non-COVID-19 acute care in patients with schizophrenia compared to patients without severe mental disorders. These findings question hospitals' resilience pertaining to patient safety and underline the importance of developing specific strategies for vulnerable patients in anticipation of future public health emergencies.

14.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 1688, 2022 09 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2038703

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The World Health Organization (WHO) considers that the heterogeneity of concepts and definitions of migrants is an obstacle to obtaining evidence to inform public health policies. There is no recent data on the health status of only asylum seekers who have recently arrived in their Western host country. The purpose of this study was to determine the health status of asylum seekers and search for explanatory factors for this health status. METHODS: This cross-sectional observational study screened the mental and somatic health of adult asylum seekers who had arrived in France within the past 21 days and went to the Marseille single center between March 1 and August 31, 2021. In order to study the explanatory factors of the asylum seekers' health status, a multivariate analysis was performed using a logistic regression model to predict the health status. Factors taken into account were those significantly associated with outcome (level < 0.05) in univariate analysis. RESULTS: In total, 419 asylum seekers were included and 96% CI95%[93;97.3] had at least one health disorder. Concerning mental health, 89% CI95% [85.1;91.4] had a mental disorder and in terms of somatic health exclusively, 66% CI95% [61.4;70.6] had at least one somatic disorder. Women were more likely to have a somatic disease OR = 1.80 [1.07; 3.05]. We found a statistically significant association between the presence of at least one disorder and sleeping in a public space OR = 3.4 [1.02;11.28] p = 0.046. This association is also found for mental disorders OR = 2.36 [1.16;4.84], p = 0.018. CONCLUSIONS: Due to the high prevalence of health disorders our study found, asylum seekers are a population with many care needs when they arrive in their host country. The main factors linked to a poor health status seem to be related to a person's sex, geographical origin and sleeping in a public space.


Subject(s)
Mental Disorders , Refugees , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Status , Humans , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/psychology , Mental Health , Refugees/psychology
15.
Ann Med Psychol (Paris) ; 180(7): 707-712, 2022 Sep.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1990874

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic (caused by the Sars-CoV-2 coronavirus) led to unprecedented challenges to public health, the healthcare system, and our daily lives (including work and education), particularly during the first wave in early 2020. In order to control infection of the virus, many countries have imposed restrictive measures to promote social distancing, ranging from curfews and school closures to widespread lockdown. At the beginning of 2022, there were 135,000 deaths from Sars-CoV-2 in France (nearly 6 million worldwide). Beyond the possible impact of Sars-CoV-2 on the brain, the pandemic has created complex human situations, with a possible impact on the mental health of populations. In this narrative review, we summarize current data on the impact of the pandemic on mental health in the general population and identify the most vulnerable groups. The goal is to provide more targeted prevention for these populations. Our review has identified several subgroups of subjects at higher risk of disorder in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic: those bereaved by COVID-19, adolescents, students, people with COVID (with potentially direct brain damages), and finally, health care workers. Gender disparities were accentuated, leading to more mental disorders in women. Longitudinal follow-up studies are needed to better identify the effects of the pandemic on the mental health of different populations, and also to define personalized prevention strategies. Screening and prevention measures must be taken to limit the impact of this pandemic on mental health. More generally, the "one health" approach, which places human health at the interface of environmental and animal health, seems essential to avoid the occurrence of this type of pandemic and its consequences in the future.

16.
Annales medico-psychologiques ; 2022.
Article in French | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1980808

ABSTRACT

La pandémie de COVID-19 (due au coronavirus SARS-CoV-2) a apporté des défis sans précédent en termes de santé publique, système de soins et vie quotidienne (incluant le travail et l’éducation), particulièrement lors de la première vague pandémique au début de l’année 2020. Afin de limiter la propagation du virus, de nombreux pays ont imposé des mesures restrictives pour favoriser la distanciation sociale, allant des couvre-feux et fermetures d’écoles à un confinement généralisé. Début 2022, on recense 135 000 décès dus au virus SARS-CoV-2 en France et près de 6 millions dans le monde. Au-delà de l’impact possible du SARS-CoV-2 sur le cerveau, la pandémie a été à l’origine de difficultés humaines complexes, avec un retentissement possible sur la santé mentale des populations. Dans cette revue narrative, nous résumons les données actuelles concernant l’impact de la pandémie sur la santé mentale en s’intéressant aux troubles psychiatriques en population générale et parmi les groupes vulnérables. L’objectif est de promouvoir une prévention ciblée sur ces populations. Notre revue a identifié plusieurs sous-groupes de sujets plus à risque de troubles psychiques dans le contexte de la pandémie de COVID-19 : les endeuillés par la COVID-19, les adolescents, les étudiants, les personnes atteintes par le virus (avec une atteinte potentiellement directe sur le cerveau) et enfin, le personnel de santé. Les disparités de genre ont également été accentuées, en défaveur des femmes. Des mesures de dépistage et de prévention doivent être prises pour limiter l’impact de cette pandémie sur la santé mentale. D’une façon plus générale, l’approche « une santé/one health » qui place la santé humaine (et donc mentale) à l’interface de la santé environnementale et animale semble indispensable pour éviter la survenue de ce type de pandémie et ses conséquences à l’avenir.

17.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 10(8)2022 Jul 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1969541

ABSTRACT

Schizophrenia patients are at high risk of developing severe COVID-19 outcomes but recent evidence suggests that they are under-vaccinated. This study explored the role of potential attitudinal barriers by comparing schizophrenia patients with participants from the general population regarding COVID-19 vaccination rates, general attitudes towards vaccines, and willingness to take a COVID-19 vaccine. We conducted a cross-sectional study between April 2021 and October 2021. A total of 100 people with schizophrenia and 72 nonclinical controls were recruited. In our study, individuals with schizophrenia were under-vaccinated, despite similar general attitudes towards vaccination and higher willingness to be vaccinated against COVID-19 compared to nonclinical participants. In patients, negative attitudes toward vaccines were related to higher levels of negative psychotic symptoms and higher levels of paranoid ideation. As a whole, participants with more negative attitudes towards vaccines were less likely to be vaccinated against COVID-19 and had lower levels of trust in institutions. Vaccine hesitancy does not appear to be a major barrier for COVID-19 vaccine uptake amongst people with schizophrenia. This study suggests that disparities in COVID-19 vaccination rates in schizophrenia do not seem related to attitudinal but rather structural barriers.

18.
Int J Nurs Stud ; 135: 104328, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1956174

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is now a wealth of evidence showing that work is a major determinant of physical and mental health. Recent studies have suggested increased rates of depression in healthcare workers (HCWs) in the context of the Covid-19 pandemic, with direct impact on care quality and productivity. AIM: To determine the rate of clinical depression in a national sample of HCWs in France during the post-Covid-19 area and to identify related factors (professional, individual and health-related risk behaviors) using a structural equation modeling analysis. METHOD: A survey comprising a number of standardized scales was sent to public and private national healthcare facilities through the mail or disseminated through emails from professional associations and social networks. RESULTS: 10,325 participants were recruited; 3122 (30.2%, 95% confidence interval [29.4-31.1]) met likely diagnostic criteria for clinical depression. Professional factors had the largest total effect (ß = 0.57) (burn-out: ß = 0.74, sustained bullying at the workplace ß = 0.48 and decision-making latitude ß = -0.47), followed by individual factors (ß = 0.30) (the main individual factor was recurrent major depression, path coefficient = 0.67). Professional factors had both a direct (path coefficient = 0.38) and indirect (through health risk behaviors, path coefficient = 0.19) effect on depression. Individual factors had a direct (path coefficient 0.21) and indirect (through health risk behaviors (path coefficient = 0.09) effect on depression. Health risk behaviors had a direct effect on depression (path coefficient = 0.31). INTERPRETATION: These results provide potential explanations for the likely causes of poor psychological health among HCWs. We propose several potential interventions related to professional factors and health risk behaviors. Our results suggest that improving organizational issues, reducing exposure to potentially morally injurious events, promoting brief naps at work and provision of evidence-based prevention approaches have been reported to be helpful in supporting the mental health of hospital staff (not only relaxation or stress management but training in leadership aspects, increasing the knowledge and practice of giving efficient performance feedback, reducing conflicting demands and peer support programs such as Trauma Risk Management. Our data suggest that developing caregivers reported experience and outcome measures (CREMs/CROMs) would be helpful to monitor work environment and its effect on depression in healthcare workers.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Pandemics
19.
Rev Infirm ; 71(277): 34-35, 2022 Jan.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1626351

ABSTRACT

Burn out is defined as a state of psychological exhaustion in the face of an unfavourable work environment. In the health sector, this includes, among other things, an excessive care burden, the lack of autonomy or control over work, the vicious circle of absenteeism, the lack of support, moral and sexual harassment, discrimination or the Covid-19 health crisis. Burn-out also increases the risk of depression among care workers.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Workplace
20.
JAMA Psychiatry ; 78(11): 1208-1217, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1326723

ABSTRACT

Importance: Heterogeneous evidence exists for the association between COVID-19 and the clinical outcomes of patients with mental health disorders. It remains unknown whether patients with COVID-19 and mental health disorders are at increased risk of mortality and should thus be targeted as a high-risk population for severe forms of COVID-19. Objective: To determine whether patients with mental health disorders were at increased risk of COVID-19 mortality compared with patients without mental health disorders. Data Sources: For this systematic review and meta-analysis, MEDLINE, Web of Science, and Google Scholar were searched from inception to February 12, 2021. Bibliographies were also searched, and the corresponding authors were directly contacted. The search paradigm was based on the following combination: (mental, major[MeSH terms]) AND (COVID-19 mortality[MeSH terms]). To ensure exhaustivity, the term mental was replaced by psychiatric, schizophrenia, psychotic, bipolar disorder, mood disorders, major depressive disorder, anxiety disorder, personality disorder, eating disorder, alcohol abuse, alcohol misuse, substance abuse, and substance misuse. Study Selection: Eligible studies were population-based cohort studies of all patients with identified COVID-19 exploring the association between mental health disorders and mortality. Data Extraction and Synthesis: Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) reporting guideline was used for abstracting data and assessing data quality and validity. This systematic review is registered with PROSPERO. Main Outcomes and Measures: Pooled crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for the association of mental health disorders with mortality were calculated using a 3-level random-effects (study/country) approach with a hierarchical structure to assess effect size dependency. Results: In total, 16 population-based cohort studies (data from medico-administrative health or electronic/medical records databases) across 7 countries (1 from Denmark, 2 from France, 1 from Israel, 3 from South Korea, 1 from Spain, 1 from the UK, and 7 from the US) and 19 086 patients with mental health disorders were included. The studies covered December 2019 to July 2020, were of good quality, and no publication bias was identified. COVID-19 mortality was associated with an increased risk among patients with mental health disorders compared with patients without mental health disorders according to both pooled crude OR (1.75 [95% CI, 1.40-2.20]; P < .05) and adjusted OR (1.38 [95% CI, 1.15-1.65]; P < .05). The patients with severe mental health disorders had the highest ORs for risk of mortality (crude OR: 2.26 [95% CI, 1.18-4.31]; adjusted OR: 1.67 [95% CI, 1.02-2.73]). Conclusions and Relevance: In this systematic review and meta-analysis of 16 observational studies in 7 countries, mental health disorders were associated with increased COVID-19-related mortality. Thus, patients with mental health disorders should have been targeted as a high-risk population for severe forms of COVID-19, requiring enhanced preventive and disease management strategies. Future studies should more accurately evaluate the risk for patients with each mental health disorder. However, the highest risk seemed to be found in studies including individuals with schizophrenia and/or bipolar disorders.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Comorbidity , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Humans
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