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1.
Small and Medium Sized Enterprises and the COVID-19 Response: Global Perspectives on Entrepreneurial Crisis Management ; : 251-271, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2030222

ABSTRACT

With the advancement of globalization, economies are increasingly interconnected in such a way that large disruptive events, which would have had a limited global impact in the past, have become more frequent and widespread. Just to name a few, financial and economic crises (such as the 2008-2009 global financial crisis and the subsequent worldwide recession), natural disasters (such as the 2011 Japan earthquake), and epidemics (like the one caused by SARS in 2003), have all occurred over the last twenty years. The impact of such events varies. Some have caused massive reductions of demand (demand shock);others have led to a change in supply conditions, forcing firms to suspend or reduce their output (supply shock);and others have presented both characteristics. Financial crises, particularly, may cause a "deep deterioration of conditions in financial markets, leading to a severe credit crunch" (Colombo et al., 2016, p. 648). © Hamid Etemad 2022. All rights reserved.

2.
Vox Sanguinis ; 117(SUPPL 1):223, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1916309

ABSTRACT

Background: Acute Transverse Myelitis (ATM) is a very uncommon neurological syndrome, characterized by acute or subacute spinal cord dysfunction that can lead to paresthesias, sensory/autonomic impairment and paralysis. The aetiology is often unclear, but infectious, para-infectious, systemic autoimmune diseases, paraneoplastic, ischemic diseases and drugs are potential causes. Vaccine administration can also trigger an immune response and induce an autoimmune response;however, ATM has rarely been reported as a complication of COVID-19 infections or vaccination. The treatment mainly consists of steroids and plasmapheresis, which often reverses any neurologic symptoms. The therapeutic plasmapheresis is a highly complex procedure. It separates the patient's blood components replacing the plasma removed by solution that can be fresh frozen plasma or albumin, allowing the removal of the autoantibody, immune complex, lipoprotein or endotoxin that's causing the pathology. Aims: Clinical case report. Methods: A 46-year-old male patient, with personal history of hypertension and obesity, 3 weeks after COVID-19 vaccination, presented to the emergency department due to urinary complaints (urgency and pollakiuria), progressive numbness, paresthesias and decreased muscle strength in the lower limbs and decreased sensibility in the perineal region. Physical examination revealed total gait disability, decreased sensation and strength in the right lower limb, loss of sensation and plegia in the left lower limb and urinary incontinence. Initial laboratory workup and CT imaging of the brain, cervical, dorsal and lumbar spine were normal. The patient was admitted to Neurology internment for further study and treatment. During hospitalization, lumbar puncture and MRI of the dorsal and lumbosacral neuraxis were performed, but only allowed us to exclude infectious and compressive etiologies. The inflammatory aetiology was assumed as the most probable, so acute therapy with pulses of methylprednisolone was initiated. In the remaining study, weakly positive anti-MOG (Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein) antibodies were detected in the serum. Therapeutic plasmapheresis using a cell separator (which use centrifugal force to separate components according to their density) was proposed as additional therapy. Seven sessions were performed without intercurrences. Results: During acute therapy, there was a partial improvement in sensitivity and strength in lower limbs. The patient started a rehabilitation program with favourable neurological recovery. At the time of hospital discharge, he still needed crutch support for walking and had muscle strength grade 4-/5 bilaterally. Summary/Conclusions: Although the patient maintained some functional limitation and there was not a complete resolution of the neurological symptoms, he showed a good response to acute therapy. The plasmapheresis, by permitting the antibody to be removed faster than would occur by its endogenous clearance, proved to be fundamental in the clinical recovery of the patient. No relationship between COVID-19 vaccination and the event was established.

3.
Hematology, Transfusion and Cell Therapy ; 43:S468-S469, 2021.
Article in Portuguese | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1859685

ABSTRACT

Objetivos: Conscientizar, por meio das mídias sociais, a importância da doação de sangue, aumentar o número de doadores, ampliar a cultura sobre doação de sangue e capacitar os alunos do curso de Medicina a fim de se tornarem multiplicadores. O Projeto de Extensão Amigo de Sangue (PEAS) é um programa de incentivo à doação de sangue elaborado pelos integrantes da Liga Acadêmica de Hematologia – HemoLiga em conjunto com a Fundação Hemominas Juiz de Fora (FH) e vinculado ao Programa Sangue Jovem da Associação Brasileira de Hematologia, Hemoterapia e Terapia Celular. Material e métodos: O PEAS foi elaborado em fevereiro de 2021 pelos ligantes da HemoLiga e atuou nas seguintes esferas: divulgação de conteúdo informativo sobre doação de sangue e levantamento das doações de sangue efetuadas através das campanhas do projeto. O conteúdo informativo foi divulgado através das redes sociais com publicação de infográficos sobre verdades e mitos, sobre o processo de doação e sobre estimuladores da doação de sangue na FH. O veículo de comunicação escolhido para a propagação de informações acerca do projeto foram as mídias sociais em virtude do contexto epidemiológico de COVID-19 e da rápida difusão de conteúdo. Todos os participantes do PEAS foram capacitados para a realização de postagens, esclarecimentos de dúvidas e transmissão de informações pertinentes à doação de sangue na plataforma virtual. Resultados: A avaliação preliminar do PEAS realizada com dados levantados entre abril e junho de 2021 (Software de Gestão hemoterápica Hemote®) evidenciou aumento do comparecimento de doadores na FH e que as mídias sociais mostraram-se como um potente aliado no processo de captação de doadores. No período estudado, o PEAS contribuiu com 2,3% do total de doações efetivadas na FH, em relação ao sexo, 51,1% dos doadores eram do sexo masculino. Foi observado que o projeto mobilizou o tema doação de sangue em grupos de trabalhos e estimulou a formação de multiplicadores e influenciadores no processo de mobilização de doadores. A página do PEAS nas redes sociais conta com 1159 seguidores e mais de 128 publicações, garantindo ampla divulgação e visibilidade do conteúdo. Discussão: A Pandemia de Covid-19 impactou direta e negativamente no comparecimento de doadores, reduzindo o número de coletas e do estoque de bolsas de sangue. A FH atende 57 hospitais, englobando 27 cidades das macrorregional de Juiz de Fora, garantindo à população a oferta de sangue e hemoderivados de qualidade, em consonância com as diretrizes estabelecidas pelo Ministério da Saúde, realizando mais de 50 mil transfusões/ano. A meta do PEAS é se consolidar como grande influenciador na doação de sangue, com aumento do número de doadores fidelizados e ampliação da cultura de doação de sangue. Atuar na área de captação é desafiador, uma vez que o sangue é insubstituível, exigindo mobilização contínua da sociedade. Conclusão: As mídias sociais desempenharam um papel extremamente relevante para a efetividade do PEAS, uma vez que a partir delas foi possível a conscientização em massa sobre a doação de sangue e captação de doadores. Apenas com um trabalho persistente e respaldado no diálogo e na desmistificação será possível despertar na população o desejo da doação de sangue, não apenas como um ato heroico, mas também como um gesto de cidadania, compaixão, compromisso e preservação da vida.

4.
Revista Cubana de Cardiologia y Cirugia Cardiovascular ; 27(4), 2021.
Article in Spanish | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1823875

ABSTRACT

Brugada phenocopies are an electrocardiographic pattern with the same morphologhy as the Brugada Synrome type 1 and 2 pattern, in patients with metabolic, ischemic and/or mechanical alterations. This is a 74-year-old patient with a history of Arterial Hypertension, who is admitted to the Intensive Care Unit with a positive diagnosis of COVID-19. He presents mixed acidosis, severe hypoxemia and hyperkalemia and in twelve-lead electrocardiogram a Brugada type 1 pattern (coved). Metabolic disorders, myocardial damage, and ventilation/perfusion alterations in the context of a seriuos infection due to COVID-19 would be the mechanisms responsible for this electrocardiographic pattern in these patient. © 2021, Cuban Society of Cardiology, Cuban Institute of Cardiology and Cardiovascular Surgery. All rights reserved.

5.
Revista Cubana de Cardiologia y Cirugia Cardiovascular ; 27(3):1-3, 2021.
Article in Spanish | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1710405
6.
Nguyen, T.; Qureshi, M.; Martins, S.; Yamagami, H.; Qiu, Z.; Mansour, O.; Czlonkowska, A.; Abdalkader, M.; Sathya, A.; de Sousa, D. A.; Demeestere, J.; Mikulik, R.; Vanacker, P.; Siegler, J.; Korv, J.; Biller, J.; Liang, C.; Sangha, N.; Zha, A.; Czap, A.; Holmstedt, C.; Turan, T.; Grant, C.; Ntaios, G.; Malhotra, K.; Tayal, A.; Loochtan, A.; Mistry, E.; Alexandrov, A.; Huang, D.; Yaghi, S.; Raz, E.; Sheth, S.; Frankel, M.; Lamou, E. G. B.; Aref, H.; Elbassiouny, A.; Hassan, F.; Mustafa, W.; Menecie, T.; Shokri, H.; Roushdy, T.; Sarfo, F. S.; Alabi, T.; Arabambi, B.; Nwazor, E.; Sunmonu, T. A.; Wahab, K. W.; Mohammed, H. H.; Adebayo, P. B.; Riahi, A.; Ben Sassi, S.; Gwaunza, L.; Rahman, A.; Ai, Z. B.; Bai, F. H.; Duan, Z. H.; Hao, Y. G.; Huang, W. G.; Li, G. W.; Li, W.; Liu, G. Z.; Luo, J.; Shang, X. J.; Sui, Y.; Tian, L.; Wen, H. B.; Wu, B.; Yan, Y. Y.; Yuan, Z. Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, W. L.; Zi, W. J.; Leung, T. K.; Sahakyan, D.; Chugh, C.; Huded, V.; Menon, B.; Pandian, J.; Sylaja, P. N.; Usman, F. S.; Farhoudi, M.; Sadeghi-Hokmabadi, E.; Reznik, A.; Sivan-Hoffman, R.; Horev, A.; Ohara, N.; Sakai, N.; Watanabe, D.; Yamamoto, R.; Doijiri, R.; Tokuda, N.; Yamada, T.; Terasaki, T.; Yazawa, Y.; Uwatoko, T.; Dembo, T.; Shimizu, H.; Sugiura, Y.; Miyashita, F.; Fukuda, H.; Miyake, K.; Shimbo, J.; Sugimura, Y.; Yagita, Y.; Takenobu, Y.; Matsumaru, Y.; Yamada, S.; Kono, R.; Kanamaru, T.; Yamazaki, H.; Sakaguchi, M.; Todo, K.; Yamamoto, N.; Sonodda, K.; Yoshida, T.; Hashimoto, H.; Nakahara, I.; Faizullina, K.; Kamenova, S.; Kondybayeva, A.; Zhanuzakov, M.; Baek, J. H.; Hwang, Y.; Lee, S. B.; Moon, J.; Park, H.; Seo, J. H.; Seo, K. D.; Young, C. J.; Ahdab, R.; Aziz, Z. A.; Zaidi, W. A. W.; Bin Basri, H.; Chung, L. W.; Husin, M.; Ibrahim, A. B.; Ibrahim, K. A.; Looi, I.; Tan, W. Y.; Yahya, Wnnw, Groppa, S.; Leahu, P.; Al Hashmi, A.; Imam, Y. Z.; Akhtar, N.; Oliver, C.; Kandyba, D.; Alhazzani, A.; Al-Jehani, H.; Tham, C. H.; Mamauag, M. J.; Narayanaswamy, R.; Chen, C. H.; Tang, S. C.; Churojana, A.; Aykac, O.; Ozdemir, A. O.; Hussain, S. I.; John, S.; Vu, H. L.; Tran, A. D.; Nguyen, H. H.; Thong, P. N.; Nguyen, T.; Nguyen, T.; Gattringer, T.; Enzinger, C.; Killer-Oberpfalzer, M.; Bellante, F.; De Blauwe, S.; Van Hooren, G.; De Raedt, S.; Dusart, A.; Ligot, N.; Rutgers, M.; Yperzeele, L.; Alexiev, F.; Sakelarova, T.; Bedekovic, M. R.; Budincevic, H.; Cindric, I.; Hucika, Z.; Ozretic, D.; Saric, M. S.; Pfeifer, F.; Karpowicz, I.; Cernik, D.; Sramek, M.; Skoda, M.; Hlavacova, H.; Klecka, L.; Koutny, M.; Vaclavik, D.; Skoda, O.; Fiksa, J.; Hanelova, K.; Nevsimalova, M.; Rezek, R.; Prochazka, P.; Krejstova, G.; Neumann, J.; Vachova, M.; Brzezanski, H.; Hlinovsky, D.; Tenora, D.; Jura, R.; Jurak, L.; Novak, J.; Novak, A.; Topinka, Z.; Fibrich, P.; Sobolova, H.; Volny, O.; Christensen, H. K.; Drenck, N.; Iversen, H.; Simonsen, C.; Truelsen, T.; Wienecke, T.; Vibo, R.; Gross-Paju, K.; Toomsoo, T.; Antsov, K.; Caparros, F.; Cordonnier, C.; Dan, M.; Faucheux, J. M.; Mechtouff, L.; Eker, O.; Lesaine, E.; Ondze, B.; Pico, F.; Pop, R.; Rouanet, F.; Gubeladze, T.; Khinikadze, M.; Lobjanidze, N.; Tsiskaridze, A.; Nagel, S.; Ringleb, P. A.; Rosenkranz, M.; Schmidt, H.; Sedghi, A.; Siepmann, T.; Szabo, K.; Thomalla, G.; Palaiodimou, L.; Sagris, D.; Kargiotis, O.; Kaliaev, A.; Liebeskind, D.; Hassan, A.; Ranta, A.; Devlin, T.; Zaidat, O.; Castonguay, A.; Jovin, T.; Tsivgoulis, G.; Malik, A.; Ma, A.; Campbell, B.; Kleinig, T.; Wu, T.; Gongora, F.; Lavados, P.; Olavarria, V.; Lereis, V. P.; Corredor, A.; Barbosa, D. M.; Bayona, H.; Barrientos, J. D.; Patino, M.; Thijs, V.; Pirson, A.; Kristoffersen, E. S.; Patrik, M.; Fischer, U.; Bernava, G.; Renieri, L.; Strambo, D.; Ayo-Martin, O.; Montaner, J.; Karlinski, M.; Cruz-Culebras, A.; Luchowski, P.; Krastev, G.; Arenillas, J.; Gralla, J.; Mangiafico, S.; Blasco, J.; Fonseca, L.; Silva, M. L.; Kwan, J.; Banerjee, S.; Sangalli, D.; Frisullo, G.; Yavagal, D.; Uyttenboogaart, M.; Bandini, F.; Adami, A.; de Lecina, M. A.; Arribas, M. A. T.; Ferreira, P.; Cruz, V. T.; Nunes, A. P.; Marto, J. P.; Rodrigues, M.; Melo, T.; Saposnik, G.; Scott, C. A.; Shuaib, A.; Khosravani, H.; Fields, T.; Shoamanesh, A.; Catanese, L.; Mackey, A.; Hill, M.; Etherton, M.; Rost, N.; Lutsep, H.; Lee, V.; Mehta, B.; Pikula, A.; Simmons, M.; Macdougall, L.; Silver, B.; Khandelwal, P.; Morris, J.; Novakovic-White, R.; Ramakrishnan, P.; Shah, R.; Altschul, D.; Almufti, F.; Amaya, P.; Ordonez, C. E. R.; Lara, O.; Kadota, L. R.; Rivera, L. I. P.; Novarro, N.; Escobar, L. D.; Melgarejo, D.; Cardozo, A.; Blanco, A.; Zelaya, J. A.; Luraschi, A.; Gonzalez, V. H. N.; Almeida, J.; Conforto, A.; Almeida, M. S.; Silva, L. D.; Cuervo, D. L. M.; Zetola, V. F.; Martins, R. T.; Valler, L.; Giacomini, L. V.; Cardoso, F. B.; Sahathevan, R.; Hair, C.; Hankey, G.; Salazar, D.; Lima, F. O.; Mont'Alverne, F.; Moises, D.; Iman, B.; Magalhaes, P.; Longo, A.; Rebello, L.; Falup-Pecurariu, C.; Mazya, M.; Wisniewska, A.; Fryze, W.; Kazmierski, R.; Wisniewska, M.; Horoch, E.; Sienkiewicz-Jarosz, H.; Fudala, M.; Rogoziewicz, M.; Brola, W.; Sobolewski, P.; Kaczorowski, R.; Stepien, A.; Klivenyi, P.; Szapary, L.; van den Wijngaard, I.; Demchuk, A.; Abraham, M.; Alvarado-Ortiz, T.; Kaushal, R.; Ortega-Gutierrez, S.; Farooqui, M.; Bach, I.; Badruddin, A.; Barazangi, N.; Nguyen, C.; Brereton, C.; Choi, J. H.; Dharmadhikari, S.; Desai, K.; Doss, V.; Edgell, R.; Linares, G.; Frei, D.; Chaturvedi, S.; Gandhi, D.; Chaudhry, S.; Choe, H.; Grigoryan, M.; Gupta, R.; Helenius, J.; Voetsch, B.; Khwaja, A.; Khoury, N.; Kim, B. S.; Kleindorfer, D.; McDermott, M.; Koyfman, F.; Leung, L.; Linfante, I.; Male, S.; Masoud, H.; Min, J. Y.; Mittal, M.; Multani, S.; Nahab, F.; Nalleballe, K.; Rahangdale, R.; Rafael, J.; Rothstein, A.; Ruland, S.; Sharma, M.; Singh, A.; Starosciak, A.; Strasser, S.; Szeder, V.; Teleb, M.; Tsai, J.; Mohammaden, M.; Pineda-Franks, C.; Asyraf, W.; Nguyen, T. Q.; Tarkanyi, G.; Horev, A.; Haussen, D.; Balaguera, O.; Vasquez, A. R.; Nogueira, R..
Neurology ; 96(15):42, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1576349
7.
Revista Cientifica Multidisciplinar RECIMA21 ; 2(8), 2021.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1548014

ABSTRACT

In 2019, a new obscured pneumonia was reported by Wuhan Chinese scientists. Posteriorly, SARS-Cov-2 structure was identified, furthermore the pathology caused by this virus was named asCOVID-19. The period of incubation of this disease is something about 4 or 5 days before the onset of symptoms, with 97,5% of patients having 11,5 days of symptoms nearly. Furthermore, affected patients are having cutaneous manifestations, in addition to the classic pulmonary, laboratorial, and systemic affection. Thus, the goal of the present article was the description of the clinical, cutaneous and laboratorial manifestations in adults of 18 to 59 years old affected by COVID-19 and supported by Sao Rafael hospital, localized in Altamira-Para, a region of Amazon.

8.
Revista Conrado ; 17(81):476-483, 2021.
Article in Spanish | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1469202

ABSTRACT

This work was carried out as a result of the survey applied in which it was determined that most of the students do not have Internet or electronic devices to develop the teaching-learning process;therefore, we set the objective of implementing practical physical planning with scientific content that will allow the student to achieve learning in the face of the COVID-19 emergency. The methods used were inductive-deductive and techniques such as the survey. In this research there was a trilogy that was very well used to achieve good results in the field of education, on the one hand, there were the educational programs provided by the Ministry that were very well used to develop the plans and these were delivered to the students of the Educational Unit "Maria Luisa de Sotomayor" who did not have access to the Internet.

9.
Nguyen, T.; Qureshi, M.; Martins, S.; Yamagami, H.; Qiu, Z.; Mansour, O.; Czlonkowska, A.; Abdalkader, M.; Sathya, A.; Sousa, D. A.; Demeester, J.; Mikulik, R.; Vanacker, P.; Siegler, J.; Korv, J.; Biller, J.; Liang, C.; Sangha, N.; Zha, A.; Czap, A.; Holmstedt, C.; Turan, T.; Grant, C.; Ntaios, G.; Malhotra, K.; Tayal, A.; Loochtan, A.; Mistry, E.; Alexandrov, A.; Huang, D.; Yaghi, S.; Raz, E.; Sheth, S.; Frankel, M.; Lamou, E. G. B.; Aref, H.; Elbassiouny, A.; Hassan, F.; Mustafa, W.; Menecie, T.; Shokri, H.; Roushdy, T.; Sarfo, F. S.; Alabi, T.; Arabambi, B.; Nwazor, E.; Sunmonu, T. A.; Wahab, K. W.; Mohammed, H. H.; Adebayo, P. B.; Riahi, A.; Sassi, S. B.; Gwaunza, L.; Rahman, A.; Ai, Z.; Bai, F.; Duan, Z.; Hao, Y.; Huang, W.; Li, G.; Li, W.; Liu, G.; Luo, J.; Shang, X.; Sui, Y.; Tian, L.; Wen, H.; Wu, B.; Yan, Y.; Yuan, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, W.; Zi, W.; Leung, T. K.; Sahakyan, D.; Chugh, C.; Huded, V.; Menon, B.; Pandian, J.; Sylaja, P. N.; Usman, F. S.; Farhoudi, M.; Sadeghi-Hokmabadi, E.; Reznik, A.; Sivan-Hoffman, R.; Horev, A.; Ohara, N.; Sakai, N.; Watanabe, D.; Yamamoto, R.; Doijiri, R.; Kuda, N.; Yamada, T.; Terasaki, T.; Yazawa, Y.; Uwatoko, T.; Dembo, T.; Shimizu, H.; Sugiura, Y.; Miyashita, F.; Fukuda, H.; Miyake, K.; Shimbo, J.; Sugimura, Y.; Yagita, Y.; Takenobu, Y.; Matsumaru, Y.; Yamada, S.; Kono, R.; Kanamaru, T.; Yamazaki, H.; Sakaguchi, M.; Todo, K.; Yamamoto, N.; Sonodda, K.; Yoshida, T.; Hashimoto, H.; Nakahara, I.; Faizullina, K.; Kamenova, S.; Kondybayev, A.; Zhanuzakov, M.; Baek, J. H.; Hwang, Y.; Lee, S. B.; Moon, J.; Park, H.; Seo, J. H.; Seo, K. D.; Young, C. J.; Ahdab, R.; Aziz, Z. A.; Zaidi, W. A. W.; Basr, H. B.; Chung, L. W.; Husin, M.; Ibrahim, A. B.; Ibrahim, K. A.; Looi, I.; Tan, W. Y.; Yahya, W. N. W.; Groppa, S.; Leahu, P.; Hashmi, A. A.; Imam, Y. Z.; Akhtar, N.; Oliver, C.; Kandyba, D.; Alhazzani, A.; Al-Jehani, H.; Tham, C. H.; Mamauag, M. J.; Narayanaswamy, R.; Chen, C. H.; Tang, S. C.; Churojana, A.; Aykaç, O.; Özdemir, A.; Hussain, S. I.; John, S.; Vu, H. L.; Tran, A. D.; Nguyen, H. H.; Thong, P. N.; Nguyen, T.; Nguyen, T.; Gattringer, T.; Enzinger, C.; Killer-Oberpfalzer, M.; Bellante, F.; Deblauwe, S.; Hooren, G. V.; Raedt, S. D.; Dusart, A.; Ligot, N.; Rutgers, M.; Yperzeele, L.; Alexiev, F.; Sakelarova, T.; Bedekovic, M.; Budincevic, H.; Cindric, I.; Hucika, Z.; Ozretic, D.; Saric, M. S.; Pfeifer, F.; Karpowicz, I.; Cernik, D.; Sramek, M.; Skoda, M.; Hlavacova, H.; Klecka, L.; Koutny, M.; Skoda, O.; Fiksa, J.; Hanelova, K.; Nevsimalova, M.; Rezek, R.; Prochazka, P.; Krejstova, G.; Neumann, J.; Vachova, M.; Brzezanski, H.; Hlinovsky, D.; Tenora, D.; Jura, R.; Jurak, L.; Novak, J.; Novak, A.; Topinka, Z.; Fibrich, P.; Sobolova, H.; Volny, O.; Christensen, H. K.; Drenck, N.; Iversen, H.; Simonsen, C.; Truelsen, T.; Wienecke, T.; Vibo, R.; Gross-Paju, K.; Toomsoo, T.; Antsov, K.; Caparros, F.; Cordonnier, C.; Dan, M.; Faucheux, J. M.; Mechtouff, L.; Eker, O.; Lesaine, E.; Pico, F.; Pop, R.; Rouanet, F.; Gubeladze, T.; Khinikadze, M.; Lobjanidze, N.; Tsiskaridze, A.; Nagel, S.; Arthurringleb, P.; Rosenkranz, M.; Schmidt, H.; Sedghi, A.; Siepmann, T.; Szabo, K.; Thomalla, G.; Palaiodimou, L.; Sagris, D.; Kargiotis, O.; Kaliaev, A.; Liebeskind, D.; Hassan, A.; Ranta, A.; Devlin, T.; Zaidat, O.; Castonguay, A.; Jovin, T.; Tsivgoulis, G.; Malik, A.; Ma, A.; Campbel, B.; Kleinig, T.; Wu, T.; Gongora, F.; Lavados, P.; Olavarria, V.; Lereis, V. P.; Corredor, A.; Barbosa, D. M.; Bayona, H.; Barrientos, J. D.; Patino, M.; Thijs, V.; Pirson, A.; Kristoffersen, E. S.; Patrik, M.; Fischer, U.; Bernava, G.; Renieri, L.; Strambo, D.; Ayo-Martin, O.; Montaner, J.; Karlinski, M.; Cruz-Culebras, A.; Luchowski, P.; Krastev, G.; Arenillas, J.; Gralla, J.; Mangiafico, S.; Blasco, J.; Fonseca, L.; Silva, M. L.; Kwan, J.; Banerjee, S.; Sangalli, D.; Frisullo, G.; Yavagal, D.; Uyttenboogaart, M.; Bandini, F.; Adami, A.; Lecina, M. A. D.; Arribas, M. A. T.; Ferreira, P.; Cruz, V. T.; Nunes, A. P.; Marto, J. P.; Rodrigues, M.; Melo, T.; Saposnik, G.; Scott, C. A.; Shuaib, A.; Khosravani, H.; Fields, T.; Shoamanesh, A.; Catanese, L.; MacKey, A.; Hill, M.; Etherton, M.; Rost, N.; Lutsep, H.; Lee, V.; Mehta, B.; Pikula, A.; Simmons, M.; MacDougall, L.; Silver, B.; Khandelwal, P.; Morris, J.; Novakovic-White, R.; Shah, R.; Altschul, D.; Almufti, F.; Amaya, P.; Ordonez, C. E. R.; Lara, O.; Kadota, L. R.; Rivera, L. I.; Novarro, N.; Escobar, L. D.; Melgarejo, D.; Cardozo, A.; Blanco, A.; Zelaya, J. A.; Luraschi, A.; Gonzalez, V. H.; Almeida, J.; Conforto, A.; Almeida, M. S.; Silva, L. D. D.; Cuervo, D. L. M.; Zetola, V. F.; Martins, R. T.; Valler, L.; Giacomini, L. V.; Buchdidcardoso, F.; Sahathevan, R.; Hair, C.; Hankey, G.; Salazar, D.; Lima, F. O.; Mont'alverne, F.; Iman, D. M. B.; Longo, A.; Rebello, L.; Falup-Pecurariu, C.; Mazya, M.; Wisniewska, A.; Fryze, W.; Kazmierski, R.; Wisniewska, M.; Horoch, E.; Sienkiewicz-Jarosz, H.; Fudala, M.; Goziewicz, M.; Brola, W.; Sobolewski, P.; Kaczorowski, R.; Stepien, A.; Klivenyi, P.; Szapary, L.; Wijngaard, I. V. D.; Demchuk, A.; Abraham, M.; Alvarado-Ortiz, T.; Kaushal, R.; Ortega-Gutierrez, S.; Farooqui, M.; Bach, I.; Badruddin, A.; Barazangi, N.; Nguyen, C.; Brereton, C.; Choi, J. H.; Dharmadhikari, S.; Desai, K.; Doss, V.; Edgell, R.; Linares, G.; Frei, D.; Chaturvedi, S.; Gandhi, D.; Chaudhry, S.; Choe, H.; Grigoryan, M.; Gupta, R.; Helenius, J.; Voetsch, B.; Khwaja, A.; Khoury, N.; Kim, B. S.; Kleindorfer, D.; McDermott, M.; Koyfman, F.; Leung, L.; Linfante, I.; Male, S.; Masoud, H.; Min, J.; Mittal, M.; Multani, S.; Nahab, F.; Nalleballe, K.; Rahangdale, R.; Rafael, J.; Rothstein, A.; Ruland, S.; Sharma, M.; Singh, A.; Starosciak, A.; Strasser, S.; Szeder, V.; Teleb, M.; Tsai, J.; Mohammaden, M.; Pineda-Franks, C.; Asyraf, W.; Nguyen, T. Q.; Tarkanyi, A.; Haussen, D.; Balaguera, O.; Rodriguezvasquez, A.; Nogueira, R..
Neurology ; 96(15 SUPPL 1), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1407898

ABSTRACT

Objective: The objectives of this study were to measure the global impact of the pandemic on the volumes for intravenous thrombolysis (IVT), IVT transfers, and stroke hospitalizations over 4 months at the height of the pandemic (March 1 to June 30, 2020) compared with two control 4-month periods. Background: The COVID-19 pandemic led to widespread repercussions on the delivery of health care worldwide. Design/Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional, observational, retrospective study across 6 continents, 70 countries, and 457 stroke centers. Diagnoses were identified by ICD-10 codes and/or classifications in stroke center databases. Results: There were 91,373 stroke admissions in the 4 months immediately before compared to 80,894 admissions during the pandemic months, representing an 11.5% (95%CI,-11.7 to-11.3, p<0.0001) decline. There were 13,334 IVT therapies in the 4 months preceding compared to 11,570 procedures during the pandemic, representing a 13.2% (95%CI,-13.8 to-12.7, p<0.0001) drop. Interfacility IVT transfers decreased from 1,337 to 1,178, or an 11.9% decrease (95%CI,-13.7 to-10.3, p=0.001). There were greater declines in primary compared to comprehensive stroke centers (CSC) for stroke hospitalizations (-17.3% vs-10.3%, p<0.0001) and IVT (-15.5% vs-12.6%, p=0.0001). Recovery of stroke hospitalization volume (9.5%, 95%CI 9.2-9.8, p<0.0001) was noted over the two later (May, June) versus the two earlier (March, April) months of the pandemic, with greater recovery in hospitals with lower COVID-19 hospitalization volume, high volume stroke center, and CSC. There was a 1.48% stroke rate across 119,967 COVID-19 hospitalizations. SARS-CoV-2 infection was noted in 3.3% (1,722/52,026) of all stroke admissions. Conclusions: The COVID-19 pandemic was associated with a global decline in the volume of stroke hospitalizations, IVT, and interfacility IVT transfers. Primary stroke centers and centers with higher COVID19 inpatient volumes experienced steeper declines. Recovery of stroke hospitalization was noted in the later pandemic months, with greater recovery in hospitals with lower COVID-19 hospitalizations, high volume stroke centers, and CSCs.

13.
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine ; 203(9), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1277106

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Before the COVID-19 pandemic, 20-30% of family members had symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) or anxiety, while 15-30% had symptoms of depression. Interventions supporting family members have reduced burden of these symptoms. COVID-19 has resulted in prolonged ICU stays, high morbidity/mortality, and hospital policies severely limiting family presence at the bedside. We hypothesized the combination of prolonged critical illness and the necessary reduction of family presence would lead to high rates of PTSD, anxiety, and depression;likely higher than observed in previous studies. Methods: This was a multicenter study including 12 US hospitals, 8 academic and 4 community-based hospitals. A consecutive sample of family members of all patients with COVID-19 receiving ICU admission during the spring US peak in 2020 were called 3-4 months after the patients' ICU admission, except for New York City hospitals where a random sample was generated given the large number of hospitalizations. Consented participants completed the Impact-of- Events Scale-6 (IES-6;scored 0-30, higher scores indicate more symptoms of PTSD), Hospital-Anxiety- Depression Score (HADS, scored 0-20 for anxiety and 0-20 for depression, higher scores indicate more symptoms), and a subset of questions from Family-Satisfaction in the ICU-27 (FS-ICU27;scored on a Likert scale 1 to 5, with higher scores indicating more positive responses) selected as most likely impacted by restrictive family presence.Results: There were 945 eligible family members during the study period. Of those, 594 were contacted and 269 (45.3%) consented and completed surveys. The mean IES-6 score was 12.6 (95% CI 11.8- 13.4) with 65.4% having a score of 10 or greater, consistent with high levels of symptoms of PTSD. The mean score on the HADS-anxiety was 9.4 (95% CI 8.8-10.1) with 59.5% having a score of 8 or greater, consistent with high levels of symptoms of anxiety. Finally, the mean score for the HADS-depression was 8.0 (95% CI 7.3-8.7) with 47.6% having scores of 8 or greater, consistent with high level of symptoms of depression. The mean response for the FSICU27 questions of “I felt I had control” was 3.5 (95% CI 3.3-3.6), “I felt supported” was 3.8 (95% CI 3.6-4.0), and “I felt included” was 4.3 (95% CI 4.2-4.4).Conclusion: The consequences of a family member admitted to the ICU with COVID-19 infection are significant. We identify rates of PTSD, anxiety, and depression higher than recorded in non-COVID population. Further analysis is warranted to understand modifiable risk factors for developing these symptoms.

14.
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine ; 203(9), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1277046

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: Currently, there are over 20,000 COVID-19 positive patients requiring intensive care unit (ICU) care in the United States (US). Even prior to the pandemic, up to 30% of family members of ICU patients experience post-traumatic stress disorder and up to 50% sustain potentially prolonged anxiety and/or depression. Although family bedside engagement improves both short-and long-term outcomes for patients and their families, nationwide social distancing recommendations have curtailed hospital visitation, potentially heightening the risk of stress-related disorders in these family members. The goal of this analysis is to explore the experiences of physically distanced family members of COVID-19 ICU patients in order to inform future best practices. Methods: This qualitative analysis is part of a multisite, observational, mixed-methods study of 12 US hospitals. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 75 participants from five sites;14 interviews were analyzed in this preliminary analysis. Adult family members of COVID-19 positive patients admitted to the ICU from March-June 2020 were interviewed three months post-discharge. After sequential screening by site coordinators, participants were contacted by the qualitative team until all interviews (10-15 per site) were completed. Qualitative interviews explored the illness stories, communication perceptions, and explored stressors. Thematic analysis was applied to the verbatim transcripts of the phone interviews. Four coders utilized an iteratively-developed codebook to analyze transcripts using a round-robin method with two analysts per transcript. Discrepant codes were adjudicated by a third analyst to attend to inter-rater reliability. Results: Five preliminary themes and seven subthemes emerged (Table 1). Positive communication experiences were more common than negative ones. Communication themes were: 1) Participants were reassured by proactive and frequent communication, leaving them feeling informed and included in care;and 2) Mixed feelings were expressed about the value of video-conferencing technology. Themes from the emotional and stress experiences were: 3) Profound sadness and distress resulted from isolation from patients, clinicians, and supportive family;4) Stress was amplified by external factors;and 5) Positive experiences centered upon appreciation for healthcare workers and gratitude for compassionate care. Conclusion: Incorporating the voices of family members during the COVID-19 pandemic establishes a foundation to inform family-centered, best practice guidelines to support the unique needs of family members who are physically distant from their critically ill and dying loved ones.

15.
21st Congress of the International Ergonomics Association, IEA 2021 ; 219 LNNS:123-130, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1252071

ABSTRACT

The expansion of teleworking, driven by the COVID-19 pandemic, places at the center of the research agenda, the possible implications for the teleworker´s health. This research aims to explore the lived experience in reward, social relationships and mental health in Colombian teleworkers, reported in phenomenological interviews, and to compare in which extent such experience matches with the scores obtained in sub-scales of recompense, social support, and the Goldberg general health scale, in a sample of Colombian teleworkers. A convergent mixed method QUAN + QUAL = corroboration, was used. The participants were adults, living in Colombia, with a teleworking contract for more than six months. Recruitment was done through social networks (Facebook and Twitter);a typical case sampling method was used. A comparison of the quantitative and quantitative results was made according to the common concepts identified in the two data sets. We identified in which way the data converge, diverge, or expand the understanding of the results. The quantitative and qualitative results confirmed each other in all cases. The main protective factors for the Colombian teleworker health identified were being able to avoid the use of public transport, saving time, and the comfort and tranquility of work from home. The main risk factors identified were reduction in social activity, reduction in physical activity and overwork. © 2021, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

16.
Estudios Gerenciales ; 37(158):153-163, 2021.
Article in Spanish | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1204446

ABSTRACT

The care economy integrates the work done for the care of life and well-being. The COVID-19 pandemic has generated a dramatic increase in this burden for women, evidencing the importance of researching the issue to mitigate its impact. Considering this need, this article developed a systematic literature review with three purposes: to study research trends on the topic, to analyze the role of women in the care economy in the COVID-19 pandemic, and to establish a future research agenda. The main results show that the pandemic exacerbated existing inequality gaps, affecting women in five particular areas: economic-labor situation, access to technology, healthcare, increased household work, and gender violence.

17.
Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de Sao Paulo ; 62(17), 2020.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1073182

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) is caused by SARS-Cov-2 and the manifestations of this infection range from an absence of symptoms all the way up to severe disease leading to death. To estimate the prevalence of past infection in a population, the most readily available method is the detection of antibodies against the virus. This study has investigated the prevalence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in outpatients of the Hospital das Clinicas, in Sao Paulo city (Brazil), which is a large university hospital belonging to the public health system that cares for patients with complex diseases who need tertiary or quaternary medical care. Our serological inquiry was carried out for 6 weeks, with once-aweek blood sampling and included 439 patients from several outpatient services. Overall, 61 patients tested positive for anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG (13.9%);56.1% of the patients live in Sao Paulo city, with the remaining living in other towns of the metropolitan area;32.8% of the patients testing positive for IgG antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 were asymptomatic, 55.7% developed mild or moderate disease and 11.5% had to be hospitalized. The prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 positive serology was lower among patients who had received the seasonal influenza vaccine compared to the ones who did not. These findings may indicate that those individuals care more about health issues, and/or that they have a better access to health care and/or a better quality of health care service. The large proportion of patients who were unaware of having had contact with SARS-CoV-2 deserves attention, reflecting the scarcity of tests performed in the population.

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