Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 9 de 9
Filter
1.
J Neurosurg Sci ; 2022 Apr 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1789848

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, a multitude of surveys have analyzed the impact virus spreading on the everyday medical practice, including neurosurgery. However, none have examined the perceptions of neurosurgeons towards the pandemic, their life changes, and the strategies they implemented to be able to deal with their patients in such a difficult time. METHODS: From April 2021 to May 2021 a modified Delphi method was used to construct, pilot, and refine the questionnaire focused on the evolution of global neurosurgical practice during the pandemic. This survey was distributed among 1000 neurosurgeons; the responses were then collected and critically analyzed. RESULTS: Outpatient department practices changed with a rapid rise in teleservices. 63.9% of respondents reported that they have changed their OT practices to emergency cases with occasional elective cases. 40.0% of respondents and 47.9% of their family members reported to have suffered from COVID-19. 56.2% of the respondents reported having felt depressed in the last 1 year. 40.9% of respondents reported having faced financial difficulties. 80.6% of the respondents found online webinars to be a good source of learning. 47.8% of respondents tried to improve their neurosurgical knowledge while 31.6% spent the extra time in research activities. CONLCUSIONS: Progressive increase in operative waiting lists, preferential use of telemedicine, reduction in tendency to complete stoppage of physical clinic services and drop in the use of PPE kits were evident. Respondents' age had an impact on how the clinical services and operative practices have evolved. Financial concerns overshadow mental health.

2.
Minerva Med ; 112(5): 631-640, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1535062

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: There was significant surge in the academic publications after the onset of COVID-19 outbreak. The aim of this study was to scientometrically analyze all the medical publications on COVID-19 in 2020 as well as the top 100 cited articles. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: We performed a search of the "Web of Science" database using the keywords "COVID," and "corona" on December 20, 2020. EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: Our search retrieved a total of 45,420 articles on the topic COVID-19 in the year 2020. Corresponding authors from 143 countries contributed to these articles. The highest number of articles were contributed by corresponding authors from the USA (N.=10299), whereas 50 articles in the top 100 cited articles had corresponding authors from China. Among the top 100 cited, the majority were published from Huazhong University of Science and Technology in China (N.=37). New England Journal of Medicine had the maximum impact (h-index of 57), closely followed by Lancet (h-index=55). CONCLUSIONS: Scientific publications amount on COVID-19 disease grew at an astonishing pace during 2020. We caution the readers that this rapidity of publication could have missed out on the rigorous review process and the scientific basis of the methods followed.


Subject(s)
Bibliometrics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Databases, Factual/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Periodicals as Topic/statistics & numerical data , Time Factors
3.
World Neurosurg ; 150: e645-e656, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1142299

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Global use of telemedicine has increased rapidly during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic to bridge the gap in existing health care services. Intercontinental trends in neurosurgeons' perception and practices of telemedicine have been sparingly reported. METHODS: We conducted an online anonymized and validated survey using a structured questionnaire to gain insight into neurosurgeons' experience with telemedicine across various continents and rated its usefulness on a 5-point Likert scale. RESULTS: We received 286 responses across 5 continents. There was a trend to support a major paradigm shift favoring teleconsultations during the COVID-19 pandemic in respondents from North America (P = 0.06). Signed prescriptions were e-mailed along with video-based teleconsultations preferentially in Europe and North America. In comparison, audio- or text-based teleconsultations along with unsigned prescriptions were prevalent in Asia and Africa (P = 0.0005). Acceptability and perceived usefulness for telemedicine during the pandemic were similar across the globe, regardless of neurosurgeons' experience (mean satisfaction score 3.72 ± 1.09; P = 0.62). A majority of neurosurgeons from Asia and South America complained of difficulties during teleconsultations owing to lack of appropriate infrastructure, internet connectivity/prescription-related issues, and potential risk of litigation (P = 0.0005). Approximately 46% of neurosurgeons, predominantly from Europe and North America, thought that telemedicine could play a vital role in clinical practice even after the COVID-19 pandemic subsides (mean satisfaction score 3.26 ± 1.16; P = 0.007). CONCLUSIONS: Telemedicine in neurosurgery is a viable alternative to physical outpatient services during the COVID-19 pandemic and could potentially play a vital role after the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neurosurgery/trends , Pandemics , Remote Consultation/trends , Ambulatory Care , Humans , Internet , Neurosurgeons , Neurosurgery/economics , Neurosurgery/methods , Prescriptions , Remote Consultation/economics , Remote Consultation/methods , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/trends
5.
Neurosurgery ; 87(4): 854-856, 2020 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-641027

ABSTRACT

Even though neurosurgeons exercise these enormous and versatile skills, the COVID-19 pandemic has shaken the fabrics of the global neurosurgical family, jeopardizing human lives, and forcing the entire world to be locked down. We stand on the shoulders of the giants and will not forget their examples and their teachings. We will work to the best of our ability to honor their memory. Professor Harvey Cushing said: "When to take great risks; when to withdraw in the face of unexpected difficulties; whether to force an attempted enucleation of a pathologically favorable tumor to its completion with the prospect of an operative fatality, or to abandon the procedure short of completeness with the certainty that after months or years even greater risks may have to be faced at a subsequent session-all these require surgical judgment which is a matter of long experience." It is up to us, therefore, to keep on the noble path that we have decided to undertake, to accumulate the surgical experience that these icons have shown us, the fruit of sacrifice and obstinacy. Our tribute goes to them; we will always remember their excellent work and their brilliant careers that will continue to enlighten all of us.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/history , Neurosurgery/history , Pandemics/history , Pneumonia, Viral/history , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , History, 21st Century , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , SARS-CoV-2
6.
J Neurosurg Sci ; 64(4): 383-388, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-729819

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: More than a million and a half people are infected worldwide with more than 90,000 casualties. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is radically altering both socio-economic and health care scenarios. METHODS: On April 4th, 2020, at 13:30 CET, a webinar was broadcasted, organized by Global Neuro and supported by WFNS. Expert neurosurgeons from six different countries (China, Italy, South Korea, the USA, Colombia, and the UK) reported on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on their health care systems and neurosurgical activity. RESULTS: The first part focused on the epidemiology until that date. The USA were the most affected State with 450,000 cases, followed by Italy (140,000 cases and 19,000 casualties), China (83,305 cases and 3345 have died), South Korea (10,156 cases with 177 casualties), the UK (38,168 cases and 3605 deaths) and Colombia (1267 cases and 25 deaths). The second part concerned Institution and staff reorganization. In every country all surgical plans have been modified. The third part was about neurosurgical practice during the COVID-19 pandemic. The fourth and last part touched upon how to perform safe surgery and re-start after the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: In general, the pandemic scenario was presented as a thought-provoking challenge in all countries which requires tireless efforts for both maintaining emergency and elective neurosurgical procedures.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/surgery , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Neurosurgical Procedures , Pneumonia, Viral/surgery , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Elective Surgical Procedures/methods , Humans , Neurosurgeons , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Acta Neurochir (Wien) ; 162(8): 1789-1794, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-603960

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has an impact also on neurosurgical training and education, especially in most affected countries. We surveyed Italian neurosurgical residents, asking them to provide a brief description and analyze the situation they are experiencing and how the educational system reacted to the pandemic in one of the most affected countries all over the world. METHODS: An 18-question, web-based survey was administered to Italian neurosurgical residents from May 3 to May 11, 2020, by web-link or e-mail invitation. Closed-ended, multiple choice questions were focused on the experience of neurosurgical residents in the last 2 months (from March to May 2020) concerning both clinical and educational aspects. RESULTS: Among 331 Italian neurosurgical residents invited to participate, 192 responded to the survey (58%). According to the participants' responses, in the whole country, only 29.7% of residents were directly involved in the clinical management of COVID-19 patients. Time spent in the clinic and surgical activity was significantly reduced in most of the cases. Educational activities as well as scientific activity and time spent for studying, on the other hand, were reported to be significantly increased by the majority of respondents. CONCLUSIONS: Most Italian neurosurgical residents reported significant changes on both training and education, highlighting a prompt reaction of the educational system in the whole country, regardless the local and regional diffusion of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Internship and Residency , Neurosurgery/education , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Neurosurgeons , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Time Factors , Workload
8.
World Neurosurg ; 139: e818-e826, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-324728

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has consistently changed medical practice throughout specialties, regardless of their contribution in facing the disease itself. We surveyed neurosurgeons worldwide to investigate the situation they are experiencing. METHODS: A 17-question, web-based survey was administered to neurosurgeons worldwide through the World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies and the Neurosurgery Cocktail from March 28 to April 5, 2020, by web link or e-mail invitation. Questions were divided into 3 subgroups: general information, health system organization, and institutional plans for the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak. Collected data were initially elaborated using SurveyMonkey software. Country-specific data were extracted from the World Health Organization website. Statistical analysis was performed using R, version 3.6.3. RESULTS: Of the 446 respondents, most were from Italy (20%), India (19%), and Pakistan (5%). Surgical activity was significantly reduced in most centers (79%) and dedicated in-hospital routes were created for patients with SARS-CoV-2 (58%). Patient screening was performed only when there were symptoms (57%) and not routinely before surgery (18%). The preferred methods included a nasopharyngeal swab and chest radiograph. Health professionals were rarely screened (20%) and sometimes, even if SARS-CoV-2 positive, were asked to work if asymptomatic (26%). Surgical planning was changed in most institutions (92%), whereas indications were modified for nonurgent procedures (59%) and remained unchanged for subarachnoid hemorrhages (85%). CONCLUSIONS: Most neurosurgeons worldwide reported work reorganization and practices that respond to current international guidelines. Differences in practice might be related to the perception of the pandemic and significant differences in the health systems. Sharing data and experiences will be of paramount importance to address the present moment and challenges in the near future.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/surgery , Global Health/standards , Neurosurgeons/standards , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/surgery , Surveys and Questionnaires/standards , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Global Health/trends , Humans , Neurosurgeons/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL