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1.
BMC Infect Dis ; 22(1): 314, 2022 Mar 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1770495

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To improve understanding of the antibody response to SARS-CoV-2 infection, we examined seroprevalence, incidence of infection, and seroconversion among a cohort of young adults living on university campuses during the fall of 2020. METHODS: At the beginning (semester start) and end (semester end) of an 11-week period, serum collected from 107 students was tested using the qualitative Abbott Architect SARS-CoV-2 IgG and AdviseDx SARS-CoV-2 IgG II assays. Results were matched to interim weekly surveillance viral testing and symptom data. RESULTS: With the SARS-CoV-2 IgG assay, 15 (14.0%) students were seropositive at semester start; 29 (27.1%) students were seropositive at semester end; 10 (9.3%) were seropositive at both times. With the AdviseDx SARS-CoV-2 IgG II assay, 17 (16.3%) students were seropositive at semester start, 37 (35.6%) were seropositive at semester end, and 16 (15.3%) were seropositive at both times. Overall, 23 students (21.5%) had positive viral tests during the semester. Infection was identified by serial testing in a large majority of individuals who seroconverted using both assays. Those seropositive at semester end more frequently reported symptomatic infections (56.5%) than asymptomatic infections (30.4%). CONCLUSION: Differences between antibody targets were observed, with more declines in antibody index values below the threshold of positivity with the anti-nucleocapsid assay compared to the anti-spike assay. Serology testing, combined with serial viral testing, can detect seroconversions, and help understand the potential correlates of protection provided by antibodies to SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Humans , Seroconversion , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Students , Universities
2.
Public Health Rep ; 137(1): 128-136, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506259

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The number of SARS-CoV-2 infections is underestimated in surveillance data. Various approaches to assess the seroprevalence of antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 have different resource requirements and generalizability. We estimated the seroprevalence of antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 in Denver County, Colorado, via a cluster-sampled community survey. METHODS: We estimated the overall seroprevalence of antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 via a community seroprevalence survey in Denver County in July 2020, described patterns associated with seroprevalence, and compared results with cumulative COVID-19 incidence as reported to the health department during the same period. In addition, we compared seroprevalence as assessed with a temporally and geographically concordant convenience sample of residual clinical specimens from a commercial laboratory. RESULTS: Based on 404 specimens collected through the community survey, 8.0% (95% CI, 3.9%-15.7%) of Denver County residents had antibodies to SARS-CoV-2, an infection rate of about 7 times that of the 1.1% cumulative reported COVID-19 incidence during this period. The estimated infection-to-reported case ratio was highest among children (34.7; 95% CI, 11.1-91.2) and males (10.8; 95% CI, 5.7-19.3). Seroprevalence was highest among males of Black race or Hispanic ethnicity and was associated with previous COVID-19-compatible illness, a previous positive SARS-CoV-2 test result, and close contact with someone who had confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection. Testing of 1598 residual clinical specimens yielded a seroprevalence of 6.8% (95% CI, 5.0%-9.2%); the difference between the 2 estimates was 1.2 percentage points (95% CI, -3.6 to 12.2 percentage points). CONCLUSIONS: Testing residual clinical specimens provided a similar seroprevalence estimate yet yielded limited insight into the local epidemiology of COVID-19 and might be less representative of the source population than a cluster-sampled community survey. Awareness of the limitations of various sampling strategies is necessary when interpreting findings from seroprevalence assessments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , COVID-19/immunology , Child , Child, Preschool , Colorado/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Sex Factors , Young Adult
3.
Vaccine ; 39(44): 6460-6463, 2021 10 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1466953

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Safe and effective hepatitis A vaccines have been recommended in the United States for at-risk adults since 1996; however, adult vaccination coverage is low. METHODS: Among a random sample of adult outbreak-associated hepatitis A cases from three states that were heavily affected by person-to-person hepatitis A outbreaks, we assessed the presence of documented Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) indications for hepatitis A vaccination, hepatitis A vaccination status, and whether cases that were epidemiologically linked to an outbreak-associated hepatitis A case had received postexposure prophylaxis (PEP). RESULTS: Overall, 74.1% of cases had a documented ACIP indication for hepatitis A vaccination. Fewer than 20% of epidemiologically linked cases received PEP. CONCLUSIONS: Efforts are needed to increase provider awareness of and adherence to ACIP childhood and adult hepatitis A vaccination and PEP recommendations in order to stop the current person-to-person hepatitis A outbreaks and prevent similar outbreaks in the future.


Subject(s)
Hepatitis A , Adult , Child , Disease Outbreaks , Hepatitis A/epidemiology , Hepatitis A/prevention & control , Humans , Immunization , Prevalence , United States/epidemiology , Vaccination
4.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 8(9): ofab405, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1434432

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Multiple severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) outbreaks occurred at universities during Fall 2020, but little is known about risk factors for campus-associated infections or immunity provided by anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in young adults. METHODS: We conducted surveys and serology tests among students living in dormitories in September and November to examine infection risk factors and antibody presence. Using campus weekly reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test results, the relationship between survey responses, SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, and infections was assessed. RESULTS: Of 6136 students, 1197 completed the survey and 572 also completed serologic testing in September compared with 517 and 414 in November, respectively. Participation in fraternity or sorority events (adjusted risk ratio [aRR], 1.9 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.4-2.5]) and frequent alcohol consumption (aRR, 1.6 [95% CI, 1.2-2.2]) were associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Mask wearing during social events (aRR, 0.6 [95% CI, .6-1.0]) was associated with decreased risk. None of the 20 students with antibodies in September tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 during the semester, while 27.8% of students who tested RT-PCR positive tested negative for antibodies in November. CONCLUSIONS: Frequent drinking and attending social events were associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Antibody presence in September appeared to be protective from reinfection, but this finding was not statistically significant.

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