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1.
Noncoding RNA ; 8(4)2022 Aug 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2023953

ABSTRACT

As research uncovers the underpinnings of cancer biology, new targeted therapies have been developed. Many of these therapies are small molecules, such as kinase inhibitors, that target specific proteins; however, only 1% of the genome encodes for proteins and only a subset of these proteins has 'druggable' active binding sites. In recent decades, RNA therapeutics have gained popularity due to their ability to affect targets that small molecules cannot. Additionally, they can be manufactured more rapidly and cost-effectively than small molecules or recombinant proteins. RNA therapeutics can be synthesised chemically and altered quickly, which can enable a more personalised approach to cancer treatment. Even though a wide range of RNA therapeutics are being developed for various indications in the oncology setting, none has reached the clinic to date. One of the main reasons for this is attributed to the lack of safe and effective delivery systems for this type of therapeutic. This review focuses on current strategies to overcome these challenges and enable the clinical utility of these novel therapeutic agents in the cancer clinic.

2.
HPB (Oxford) ; 23(11): 1656-1665, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525798

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic presented healthcare providers with an extreme challenge to provide cancer services. The impact upon the diagnostic and treatment capacity to treat pancreatic cancer is unclear. This study aimed to identify national variation in treatment pathways during the pandemic. METHODS: A survey was distributed to all United Kingdom pancreatic specialist centres, to assess diagnostic, therapeutic and interventional services availability, and alterations in treatment pathways. A repeating methodology enabled assessment over time as the pandemic evolved. RESULTS: Responses were received from all 29 centres. Over the first six weeks of the pandemic, less than a quarter of centres had normal availability of diagnostic pathways and a fifth of centres had no capacity whatsoever to undertake surgery. As the pandemic progressed services have gradually improved though most centres remain constrained to some degree. One third of centres changed their standard resectable pathway from surgery-first to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Elderly patients, and those with COPD were less likely to be offered treatment during the pandemic. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the capacity of the NHS to provide diagnostic and staging investigations for pancreatic cancer. The impact of revised treatment pathways has yet to be realised.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pancreatic Neoplasms , Aged , Humans , Pancreatic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pancreatic Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom/epidemiology
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