Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 8 de 8
Filter
1.
Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation ; 37(SUPPL 3):i648-i649, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1915776

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: during the COVID-19 pandemic, several guidelines have recommended the use of the Clinical Frailty Scale (CFS) for triage of critically ill patients with COVID-19 in case of shortage in ICU resources. However, no data on using CFS assessment for ICU triage for dialysis patients is yet available. This study evaluates whether CFS is associated with mortality rates in a cohort of hospitalized dialysis patients with COVID-19. METHOD: the analyses are based on data of the European Renal Association COVID-19 Database (ERACODA). Dialysis patients who presented with COVID-19 between 1 February 2020 and 30 April 2021 and with complete information on CFS and vital status at 3 months were included. Study outcomes were hospital and ICU admission rates and hospital and ICU mortality at 3 months after hospital admission. Cox regression analyses were performed to assess the association of CFS category (≤5 versus ≥ 6) and study outcomes in line with Dutch ICU triage guidelines for COVID-19. Furthermore, additional subgroup analyses were performed to assess the association between CFS and 3-month mortality by age category (<65, 65-75 and >75 years). RESULTS: among a total of 2206 dialysis patients (mean age = 67.2 (14.1) years, male sex = 61%), 1694 (77%) had CFS ≤ 5 and 514 (23%) had CFS ≥ 6. Hospitalization rate was comparable in patients with CFS ≤ 5 and in patients with CFS ≥ 6 (67 and 71%, respectively), whereas the rate of ICU admission was higher in patients with CFS ≤ 5 than in patients with CFS ≥ 6 (16 versus 9%, p = 0.001). Among 1501 hospitalized patients, 3-month mortality was 26% of patients with CFS ≤ 5 and 59% in patients with CFS ≥ 6 (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis with adjustment for patient demographics, smoking status and BMI revealed that CFS ≥ 6 was associated with hospital mortality [aHR 2.27 (1.88-2.74) versus CFS ≤ 5;P < 0.001) with a significant interaction for age (P = 0.029). aHR was 4.00 (2.56-6.37;CFS ≥ 6 versus CFS ≤ 5;P < 0.001) in patients < 65 years, aHR was 1.87 (1.33-2.64;CFS ≥ 6 versus CFS ≤ 5;P < 0.001) in patients 65-75 years and aHR was 2.12 (1.64-2.75;CFS ≥ 6 versus CFS ≤ 5;P < 0.001) in patients >75 years. Among 219 ICU admitted patients, 3-month mortality was 60% of the patients with CFS ≤ 5 and 91% in the patients with CFS ≥ 6, respectively. Multivariate analysis with adjustment for patient demographics, smoking status and BMI revealed that CFS ≥ 6 was associated with ICU mortality [aHR 1.80 (1.17-2.77);CFS ≥ 6 versus CFS ≤ 5;P = 0.002]. CONCLUSION: more frail dialysis patients with CFS ≥ 6 who are hospitalized for COVID-19 were less often admitted to the ICU, but in case they were admitted to the ICU they have a very high mortality of 91% in this cohort study. In fit to mildly frail dialysis, patients who were admitted to the ICU, mortality rates are lower. The association between frailty and hospital mortality is interacted by age with the strongest association in patients younger than 65 years. These findings suggest that CFS may be a useful complementary triage tool for ICU admission of dialysis patients during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

2.
Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation ; 37(SUPPL 3):i357-i358, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1915722

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Patients on kidney replacement therapy (KRT) are at a particularly high risk of mortality from COVID-19. In this study, we investigated COVID-19 mortality in KRT patients in the first and second waves of the pandemic and potential reasons for any difference in mortality between the two waves. METHOD: Data from the European Renal Association COVID-19 Database (ERACODA) of KRT patients who presented between 1 March 2020 and 28 February 2021 with COVID-19 were analyzed. The cut-off for dividing the first and second waves was set for 1 August 2020. The primary study outcome was 28-day mortality. Multivariable Cox proportional-hazards regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between the pandemic waves and mortality with follow-up time starting at the date of presentation. Dialysis patients and kidney transplant recipients were analyzed separately. RESULTS: Among 3004 dialysis patients (1253 in the first and 1751 in the second wave), the 28-day mortality was 24.3% in the first wave and 19.6% in the second wave (P = .002). Compared with the first wave, in the second wave, identification of patients with limited to no symptoms was higher (14.3% versus 24.8%;P < .001), hospitalization was lower (71.3% versus 44.3%;P < .001), but in-hospital mortality was similar (30.4% versus 30.7%;P = .92) (Fig. 1). Crude hazard ratio (HR) for 28-day mortality in the second wave was 0.77 (95% CI: 0.66, 0.89). However, in a fully adjusted model, when correcting for differences in patient and disease characteristics, including the reason for COVID-19 screening and disease severity, the HR for mortality in the second wave was 0.93 [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.79-1.10]. When follow-up was chosen to start at the date of first symptoms to account for possible lead-time bias, crude HR for 28-day mortality in the second wave was 0.90 (95% CI: 0.75-1.07) and the fully adjusted HR was 0.98 (95% CI: 0.81-1.18). Among 1035 kidney transplant recipients (475 in the first and 560 in the second wave), results were essentially similar except that patients in the second wave were younger (55.6 years versus 58.2 years;P = .002), and crude HR for 28-day mortality from the date of first symptoms was 0.66 (95% CI: 0.47-0.93), whereas the fully adjusted HR was 1.02 (95% CI: 0.70-1.49). CONCLUSION: Among patients on KRT with COVID-19, 28-day mortality rates were lower in the second wave compared with the first wave. However, a greater proportion of patients with minimal symptoms, lead-time bias in dialysis patients, and younger age in kidney transplant recipients possibly explain the lower mortality during the second wave. Any improvement in patient management during the second wave may not be the main reason for lower mortality. (Table Presented).

5.
BMC Geriatr ; 21(1): 650, 2021 11 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526604

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Older patients with advanced chronic kidney disease are at increased risk for a severe course of the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) and vulnerable to mental health problems. We aimed to investigate prevalence and associated patient (demographic and clinical) characteristics of mental wellbeing (health-related quality of life [HRQoL] and symptoms of depression and anxiety) before and during the COVID-19 pandemic in older patients with advanced chronic kidney disease. METHODS: An ongoing Dutch multicentre prospective cohort study enrols patients of ≥70 years with an eGFR < 20 mL/min/1.73m2 from October 2018 onward. With additional questionnaires during the pandemic (May-June 2020), disease-related concerns about COVID-19 and general anxiety symptoms were assessed cross-sectionally, and depressive symptoms, HRQoL, and emotional symptoms longitudinally. RESULTS: The 82 included patients had a median age of 77.5 years (interquartile range 73.9-82.1), 77% were male and none had tested positive for COVID-19. Cross-sectionally, 67% of the patients reported to be more anxious about COVID-19 because of their kidney disease, and 43% of the patients stated that their quality of life was reduced due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Compared to pre-COVID-19, the presence of depressive symptoms had increased (11 to 22%; p = .022) and physical HRQoL declined (M = 40.4, SD = 10.1 to M = 36.1, SD = 10.4; p < .001), particularly in males. Mental HRQoL (M = 50.3, SD = 9.6 to M = 50.4, SD = 9.9; p = .913) and emotional symptoms remained similar. CONCLUSIONS: Older patients with advanced chronic kidney disease suffered from disease-related anxiety about COVID-19, increased depressive symptoms and reduced physical HRQoL during the COVID-19 pandemic. The impact of the pandemic on this vulnerable patient group extends beyond increased mortality risk, and awareness of mental wellbeing is important. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The study is registered at the Netherlands Trial Register (NTR), trial number NL7104. Date of registration: 06-06-2018.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic , Aged , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Quality of Life , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/diagnosis , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology ; 32:85, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1489545

ABSTRACT

Background: Kidney transplant patients are at high risk for COVID-19 related mortality. However, limited data are available on longer term clinical, functional and mental outcomes in patients that survive COVID-19. Methods: Data from adult kidney transplant patients that presented with COVID-19 between February 1st, 2020 and January 31st, 2021 were retrieved from the ERACODA database. Data from patients with complete data for vital status, hospitalization and/or ICU admission was used for this analysis. Results: 912 patients were included with a mean age of 56.7 (±13.7) years. 26.4% were not hospitalized, 57.5% hospitalized, and 16.1% hospitalized and ICU admitted. Three-months survival was 82.3% overall and 98.8%, 84.2% and 49.0% resp. in each group. Three-months acute rejection, need for dialysis / CVVH at any time point, and graft failure occurred in the overall group in 1.0%, 2.6% and 1.8% resp., and in 2.1%, 10.6% and 10.6% of ICU admitted patients resp. Of the surviving patients 83.3% had reached their prior functional status within 3 months. Of patients that had not yet reached their prior functional status, it was expected that 79.6% still would do so within the coming year. 94.4% had reached their prior mental status. Of patients that had not yet reached their prior mental status, it was expected that 80% of patients would do so within the coming year. Conclusions: In patients alive at three-months follow-up, graft loss was rare, and most patients had reached their pre-COVID-19 functional and mental status. Clinical, functional, and mental outcomes in kidney transplant recipients three months after being diagnosed with COVID-19. Data of 487 patients were available for analysis of graft function related outcomes. Data of 450 patients were available for functional and mental status outcomes.

7.
Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation ; 36(SUPPL 1):i20, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1402539

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Patients on kidney replacement therapy (KRT) are at high risk of developing severe COVID-19 illness and often require high intensity care and utilisation of hospital resources. During the ongoing pandemic, the optimal care pathway and triage for KRT patients presenting with varying severity of COVID-19 illness is unknown. We studied clinical factors and outcomes associated with admission, readmission and short-term outcomes. METHOD: Data from the European Renal Association COVID-19 Database (ERACODA) was analysed. This database includes granular data on dialysis patients and kidney transplant recipients with COVID-19 from all over Europe. The clinical and laboratory features at first presentation of hospitalized and non-hospitalized patients and those who returned for second presentation were studied. In addition, possible predictors of outcome in those who were not hospitalized at first presentation were identified. RESULTS: Among 1,423 KRT patients (haemodialysis;1017/kidney transplant;406) with COVID-19, 25% (n=355) were not hospitalized at first presentation. Of them, only 10% (n=36), presented for a second time in the hospital. The median interval between the first and second presentation was 5 days (Interquartile interval: 2-7 days). Patients who re-presented had worsening of pulmonary symptoms, a fall in oxygen saturation (97% to 90%), and an increase in C-reactive protein (26 mg/L to 73 mg/L) between their attendances. Patients who re-presented after initial assessment were older (72 vs. 63 years) and initially more often had pulmonary symptoms and abnormalities on lung imaging compared with those who did not present for a second time. The 28-day mortality rate of patients admitted at the second presentation was similar to that of patients admitted at first presentation (26.5% vs. 29.7%, p=0. 61). Among patients who were not hospitalized at first presentation (mortality 6%), age, prior smoking, clinical frailty scale, and shortness of breath at first presentation were identified as predictors of mortality. CONCLUSION: KRT patients with COVID-19 and mild pulmonary abnormalities and no signs of pulmonary insufficiency can be safely returned without hospitalization. These patients should be advised to seek immediate contact when they develop respiratory distress. Our findings provide support for a risk-stratified clinical approach to admissions of KRT patients presenting with COVID-19. The study findings may be valuable for clinical triage and optimising hospital capacity utilisation during the ongoing pandemic.

8.
Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation ; 36(SUPPL 1):i310, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1402439

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Older patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at increased risk for a severe course of the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) and vulnerable to mental health problems. We aimed to investigate prevalence and associated patient (demographic and clinical) characteristics of mental wellbeing (health-related quality of life [HRQoL] and symptoms of depression and anxiety) before and during the COVID-19 pandemic in older patients with advanced CKD. METHOD: An ongoing Dutch multicentre prospective cohort study enrols patients of ≥70 years with an eGFR <20 mL/min/1.73m2 from October 2018 onward. With additional questionnaires during the pandemic (May-June 2020), disease-related concerns about COVID-19 and general anxiety symptoms were assessed crosssectionally, and depressive symptoms, HRQoL, and emotional symptoms longitudinally. RESULTS: The 82 included patients had a median age of 77.5 years (inter-quartile range 73.9-82.1), 77% was male and none had tested positive for COVID-19. Crosssectionally, 67% of the patients reported to be more anxious for COVID-19 because of their kidney disease, and 43% of the patients stated that their quality of life was reduced due to the COVID-19 pandemic (Figure 1). Higher COVID-19-related stress was associated with a lower education level (p=0.036), and patients who reported to feel more down due to COVID-19 were more often female (p=0.020). Anxiety scores were higher among females compared to males (median 4.0 [IQR 3.0-9.0] versus 2.0 [0.0- 6.0], p=0.020), and weakly associated to a decline in eGFR (correlation coefficient 0.197, p=0.023). MO505 Figure 1: Respondents' agreement to the COVID-19 related statements. Questions were scored on a scale from 1 'totally disagree' to 5 'totally agree'. Mean score for question 1 was 3.6 (IQR 2.8-5.0) n=82, question 2 mean 2.7 (IQR 1.0-4.0) n=82, question 3 mean 2.3 (IQR 1.0-4.0) n=82, question 4 mean 2.7 (IQR 1.0-4.0) n=81.Compared to pre-COVID-19, presence of depressive symptoms had increased (11% to 22%;p=0.022) and physical HRQoL declined (40.4610.1 to 36.1610.4, p<0.001). Mental HRQoL (50.369.6 to 50.469.9;p=0.913) and emotional symptoms remained similar. Males showed a greater decline in physical HRQoL (mean -5.3, SD 8.5) compared to females (mean -0.9, SD 5.7;p=0.039). CONCLUSION: Our findings show that older patients with advanced CKD suffered from disease-related anxiety for COVID-19, increased depressive symptoms, and reduced physical HRQOL during the COVID-19 pandemic. The impact of the pandemic on this vulnerable patient group extends beyond increased mortality risk, and awareness of mental health problems during the pandemic is essential. More indepth investigation on disease-related COVID-19 concerns and its implications for the CKD population is needed.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL