Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 6 de 6
Filter
1.
Interv Neuroradiol ; 27(1_suppl): 30-35, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506377

ABSTRACT

At the time of this writing, the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic continues to be a global threat, disrupting usual processes, and protocols for delivering health care around the globe. There have been significant regional and national differences in the scope and timing of these disruptions. Many hospitals were forced to temporarily halt elective neurointerventional procedures with the first wave of the pandemic in the spring of 2020, in order to prioritize allocation of resources for acutely ill patients and also to minimize coronavirus disease 2019 transmission risks to non-acute patients, their families, and health care workers. This temporary moratorium on elective neurointerventional procedures is generally credited with helping to "flatten the curve" and direct scarce resources to more acutely ill patients; however, there have been reports of some delaying seeking medical care when it was in fact urgent, and other reports of patients having elective treatment delayed with the result of morbidity and mortality. Many regions have resumed elective neurointerventional procedures, only to now watch coronavirus disease 2019 positivity rates again climbing as winter of 2020 approaches. A new wave is now forecast which may have larger volumes of hospitalized coronavirus disease 2019 patients than the earlier wave(s) and may also coincide with a wave of patients hospitalized with seasonal influenza. This paper discusses relevant and practical elements of cessation and safe resumption of nonemergent neurointerventional services in the setting of a pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Delivery of Health Care , Elective Surgical Procedures , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
3.
J Neurointerv Surg ; 12(9): 831-835, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-626369

ABSTRACT

To assess the impact of COVID-19 on neurovascular research and deal with the challenges imposed by the pandemic. METHODS: A survey-based study focused on randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and single-arm studies for acute ischemic stroke and cerebral aneurysms was developed by a group of senior neurointerventionalists and sent to sites identified through the clinical trials website (https://clinicaltrials.gov/), study sponsors, and physician investigators. RESULTS: The survey was sent to 101 institutions, with 65 responding (64%). Stroke RCTs were being conducted at 40 (62%) sites, aneurysm RCTs at 22 (34%) sites, stroke single-arm studies at 37 (57%) sites, and aneurysm single-arm studies at 43 (66%) sites. Following COVID-19, enrollment was suspended at 51 (78%) sites-completely at 21 (32%) and partially at 30 (46%) sites. Missed trial-related clinics and imaging follow-ups and protocol deviations were reported by 27 (42%), 24 (37%), and 27 (42%) sites, respectively. Negative reimbursements were reported at 17 (26%) sites. The majority of sites, 49 (75%), had put new trials on hold. Of the coordinators, 41 (63%) worked from home and 20 (31%) reported a personal financial impact. Remote consent was possible for some studies at 34 (52%) sites and for all studies at 5 (8%) sites. At sites with suspended trials (n=51), endovascular treatment without enrollment occurred at 31 (61%) sites for stroke and 23 (45%) sites for aneurysms. A total of 277 patients with acute ischemic stroke and 184 with cerebral aneurysms were treated without consideration for trial enrollment. CONCLUSION: Widespread disruption of neuroendovascular trials occurred because of COVID-19. As sites resume clinical research, steps to mitigate similar challenges in the future should be considered.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Brain Ischemia/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic/methods , Stroke/therapy , Surveys and Questionnaires , Brain Ischemia/diagnosis , Brain Ischemia/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Endovascular Procedures/trends , Female , Forecasting , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/epidemiology
4.
J Neurosurg Anesthesiol ; 32(3): 193-201, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-548377

ABSTRACT

The pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has unique implications for the anesthetic management of endovascular therapy for acute ischemic stroke. The Society for Neuroscience in Anesthesiology and Critical Care appointed a task force to provide timely, consensus-based expert recommendations using available evidence for the safe and effective anesthetic management of endovascular therapy for acute ischemic stroke during the COVID-19 pandemic. The goal of this consensus statement is to provide recommendations for anesthetic management considering the following (and they are): (1) optimal neurological outcomes for patients; (2) minimizing the risk for health care professionals, and (3) facilitating judicious use of resources while accounting for existing variability in care. It provides a framework for selecting the optimal anesthetic technique (general anesthesia or monitored anesthesia care) for a given patient and offers suggestions for best practices for anesthesia care during the pandemic. Institutions and health care providers are encouraged to adapt these recommendations to best suit local needs, considering existing practice standards and resource availability to ensure safety of patients and providers.


Subject(s)
Anesthesiology/methods , Brain Ischemia/surgery , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Stroke/surgery , Betacoronavirus , Brain Ischemia/complications , COVID-19 , Consensus , Critical Care , Europe , Humans , Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures , Neurosciences , Neurosurgery , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical , Stroke/complications , United States
5.
Stroke ; 51(7): 2263-2267, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-247793

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has broad implications on stroke patient triage. Emergency medical services providers have to ensure timely transfer of patients while minimizing the risk of infectious exposure for themselves, their co-workers, and other patients. This statement paper provides a conceptual framework for acute stroke patient triage and transfer during the COVID-19 pandemic and similar healthcare emergencies in the future.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Emergency Medical Services/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Stroke/epidemiology , Triage , Acute Disease , Asymptomatic Diseases , COVID-19 , Canada/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Delayed Diagnosis , Equipment Contamination , Health Workforce , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Professional-to-Patient/prevention & control , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Protective Devices , Resource Allocation , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/complications , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/therapy , Symptom Assessment , Time-to-Treatment , Transportation of Patients , Travel , Triage/methods , Triage/standards , Unconsciousness/etiology , Workflow
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...