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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(6)2022 03 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1765714

ABSTRACT

Homelessness is a complex global public health challenge [...].

2.
Evid Based Nurs ; 2022 Jan 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1632674
3.
Public Health Nurs ; 39(1): 96-102, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1566319

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe experiences of nurses in the Irish Public Health Nursing service working with Home Support Services (HSS) when providing home care for older people. DESIGN: Qualitative design. Two of twenty-four focus groups undertaken in 2018 are examined to report specific experiences of registered nurses. SAMPLE: The first group comprised three Public Health Nurses (PHNs) and two community Registered General Nurses (cRGNs) and the second comprised three PHNs and one cRGN. In total nine nurses participated. MEASUREMENTS: Focus group interviews were used to collect data, discussions lasted 60-90 minutes and were audio-recorded, professionally transcribed verbatim, and anonymised. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Gaps in lines of authority and accountability in day-to-day care exist, posing risks to safety. Establishing an enhanced home care model for complex cases and levels of accountability and supervision is critical. Investigating ways of adopting digital solutions to share commissioned home care plans with primary care teams (PCTs) would clarify responsibility and roles and reduce the risks of care left undone. Formally defining the role of commissioned home care agencies in primary care and that which they are expected to play during times of crisis, such as during COVID-19 pandemic will enhance integrated care and governance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Home Care Services , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Humans , Pandemics , Public Health Nursing , SARS-CoV-2
4.
BMJ Open ; 11(10): e047012, 2021 10 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1476597

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The global COVID-19 pandemic produced large-scale health and economic complications. Older people and those with comorbidities are particularly vulnerable to this virus, with nursing homes and long term care facilities (LTCF) experiencing significant morbidity and mortality associated with COVID-19 outbreaks. The aim of this rapid systematic review was to investigate measures implemented in LTCF to reduce transmission of COVID-19 and their effect on morbidity and mortality of residents, staff and visitors. SETTING: Long-term care facilities. PARTICIPANTS: Residents, staff and visitors of facilities. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Databases and repositories and MedRXiv prepublished database) were systematically searched from inception to 27 July 2020 to identify studies reporting assessment of interventions to reduce transmission of COVID-19 in nursing homes among residents, staff or visitors. Outcome measures include facility characteristics, morbidity data, case fatalities and transmission rates. Due to study quality and heterogeneity, no meta-analysis was conducted. RESULTS: The search yielded 1414 articles, with 38 studies included. Reported interventions include mass testing, use of personal protective equipment, symptom screening, visitor restrictions, hand hygiene and droplet/contact precautions, and resident cohorting. Prevalence rates ranged from 1.2% to 85.4% in residents and 0.6% to 62.6% in staff. Mortality rates ranged from 5.3% to 55.3% in residents. CONCLUSIONS: Novel evidence in this review details the impact of facility size, availability of staff and practices of operating between multiple facilities, and for-profit status of facilities as factors contributing to the size and number of COVID-19 outbreaks. No causative relationships can be determined; however, this review provides evidence of interventions that reduce transmission of COVID-19 in LTCF. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42020191569.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Humans , Long-Term Care , Nursing Homes , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Public Health Nurs ; 39(1): 202-213, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1476332

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Exploring views and experiences of public health nurses of their work environment and measurement of care practices at first postnatal visits. DESIGN: An exploratory qualitative design. Data collected using four focus groups and analyzed using thematic analysis. SAMPLE: Nineteen public health nurses from four health service regions in Ireland participated. RESULTS: Two themes emerged. Theme one identified "challenges of providing a quality service." Public health nurses identified workload demands and that the working environment can detract from the ability to provide a quality service. Challenges within the home, language barriers, and lack of support from management were key issues. Theme two identified "challenges of measuring quality of public health nursing practice." While Measuring practice through quantitative outcomes such as key performance indicators were viewed as inadequate to measure the quality of care provided, positive views of using quality process indicators to measure the quality of their practice emerged. CONCLUSIONS: Key issues concern the working environment of public health nurses and challenges of providing and measuring care practices. Absence of appropriate supports and resources means public health nurses work hard to provide quality care. Public health nurses were confident they would score high on quality process measurements of their practice.


Subject(s)
Nurses, Public Health , Female , Humans , Postnatal Care , Pregnancy , Public Health Nursing , Qualitative Research , Quality of Health Care , Workplace
6.
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