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1.
Giovanetti, M.; Slavov, S. N.; Fonseca, V.; Wilkinson, E.; Tegally, H.; Patané, J. S. L.; Viala, V. L.; San, E. J.; Rodrigues, E. S.; Santos, E. V.; Aburjaile, F.; Xavier, J.; Fritsch, H.; Adelino, T. E. R.; Pereira, F.; Leal, A.; Iani, F. C. M.; de Carvalho Pereira, G.; Vazquez, C.; Sanabria, G. M. E.; Oliveira, E. C.; Demarchi, L.; Croda, J.; Dos Santos Bezerra, R.; Paola Oliveira de Lima, L.; Martins, A. J.; Renata Dos Santos Barros, C.; Marqueze, E. C.; de Souza Todao Bernardino, J.; Moretti, D. B.; Brassaloti, R. A.; de Lello Rocha Campos Cassano, R.; Mariani, Pdsc, Kitajima, J. P.; Santos, B.; Proto-Siqueira, R.; Cantarelli, V. V.; Tosta, S.; Nardy, V. B.; Reboredo de Oliveira da Silva, L.; Gómez, M. K. A.; Lima, J. G.; Ribeiro, A. A.; Guimarães, N. R.; Watanabe, L. T.; Barbosa Da Silva, L.; da Silva Ferreira, R.; da Penha, M. P. F.; Ortega, M. J.; de la Fuente, A. G.; Villalba, S.; Torales, J.; Gamarra, M. L.; Aquino, C.; Figueredo, G. P. M.; Fava, W. S.; Motta-Castro, A. R. C.; Venturini, J.; do Vale Leone de Oliveira, S. M.; Gonçalves, C. C. M.; do Carmo Debur Rossa, M.; Becker, G. N.; Giacomini, M. P.; Marques, N. Q.; Riediger, I. N.; Raboni, S.; Mattoso, G.; Cataneo, A. D.; Zanluca, C.; Duarte Dos Santos, C. N.; Assato, P. A.; Allan da Silva da Costa, F.; Poleti, M. D.; Lesbon, J. C. C.; Mattos, E. C.; Banho, C. A.; Sacchetto, L.; Moraes, M. M.; Grotto, R. M. T.; Souza-Neto, J. A.; Nogueira, M. L.; Fukumasu, H.; Coutinho, L. L.; Calado, R. T.; Neto, R. M.; Bispo de Filippis, A. M.; Venancio da Cunha, R.; Freitas, C.; Peterka, C. R. L.; de Fátima Rangel Fernandes, C.; Navegantes, W.; do Carmo Said, R. F.; Campelo de, A. E. Melo C. F.; Almiron, M.; Lourenço, J.; de Oliveira, T.; Holmes, E. C.; Haddad, R.; Sampaio, S. C.; Elias, M. C.; Kashima, S.; Junior de Alcantara, L. C.; Covas, D. T..
Nat Microbiol ; 2022.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-1991610

ABSTRACT

The high numbers of COVID-19 cases and deaths in Brazil have made Latin America an epicentre of the pandemic. SARS-CoV-2 established sustained transmission in Brazil early in the pandemic, but important gaps remain in our understanding of virus transmission dynamics at a national scale. We use 17,135 near-complete genomes sampled from 27 Brazilian states and bordering country Paraguay. From March to November 2020, we detected co-circulation of multiple viral lineages that were linked to multiple importations (predominantly from Europe). After November 2020, we detected large, local transmission clusters within the country. In the absence of effective restriction measures, the epidemic progressed, and in January 2021 there was emergence and onward spread, both within and abroad, of variants of concern and variants under monitoring, including Gamma (P.1) and Zeta (P.2). We also characterized a genomic overview of the epidemic in Paraguay and detected evidence of importation of SARS-CoV-2 ancestor lineages and variants of concern from Brazil. Our findings show that genomic surveillance in Brazil enabled assessment of the real-time spread of emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants.

2.
International Conference on Tourism, Technology and Systems, ICOTTS 2021 ; 284:459-468, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1899050

ABSTRACT

The study of Higher Education was remotely at a time when professors and students were psychologically fragile and where the distance learning (D@L) theme was not dominated by academia, in the first wave of pandemic COVID-19 in Portugal. Given the object of study, we opted for a qualitative, exploratory, and descriptive study. The webQDA software was used to analyze videos of recorded distance learning classes on a digital platform of four curricular units, from three Portuguese Higher Education Institutions: two private and one public, from the North of Portugal. The main goal is to identify which teaching and learning strategies professors use in distance learning classes. The results were included in five categories: fundamentals, deductions, examples, challenges, and problems. It was found that the majority of professors used traditional teaching strategies, and a small minority used student-centered learning strategies. The implementation of active learning strategies is one of the most effective solutions to: actively engage students in their learning processes and to contribute to more creative students. We need to continually prepare for the future—or “futures,” as several “futures” are likely, depending on the actions. © 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd.

3.
Giovanetti, M.; Slavov, S. N.; Fonseca, V.; Wilkinson, E.; Tegally, H.; Patané, J. S. L.; Viala, V. L.; San, J. E.; Rodrigues, E. S.; Vieira Santos, E.; Aburjaile, F.; Xavier, J.; Fritsch, H.; Ribeiro Adelino, T. E.; Pereira, F.; Leal, A.; Campos de Melo Iani, F.; de Carvalho Pereira, G.; Vazquez, C.; Mercedes Estigarribia Sanabria, G.; de Oliveira, E. C.; Demarchi, L.; Croda, J.; Dos Santos Bezerra, R.; Oliveira de Lima, L. P.; Martins, A. J.; Dos Santos Barros, C. R.; Marqueze, E. C.; de Souza Todao Bernardino, J.; Moretti, D. B.; Brassaloti, R. A.; de Lello Rocha Campos Cassano, R.; Drummond Sampaio Corrêa Mariani, P.; Kitajima, J. P.; Santos, B.; Proto-Siqueira, R.; Cantarelli, V. V.; Tosta, S.; Brandão Nardy, V.; Reboredo de Oliveira da Silva, L.; Astete Gómez, M. K.; Lima, J. G.; Ribeiro, A. A.; Guimarães, N. R.; Watanabe, L. T.; Barbosa Da Silva, L.; da Silva Ferreira, R.; MP, F. da Penha, Ortega, M. J.; Gómez de la Fuente, A.; Villalba, S.; Torales, J.; Gamarra, M. L.; Aquino, C.; Martínez Figueredo, G. P.; Fava, W. S.; Motta-Castro, A. R. C.; Venturini, J.; do Vale Leone de Oliveira, S. M.; Cavalheiro Maymone Gonçalves, C.; Debur Rossa, M. D. C.; Becker, G. N.; Presibella, M. M.; Marques, N. Q.; Riediger, I. N.; Raboni, S.; Coelho, G. M.; Cataneo, A. H. D.; Zanluca, C.; Dos Santos, C. N. D.; Assato, P. A.; Allan da Silva da Costa, F.; Poleti, M. D.; Chagas Lesbon, J. C.; Mattos, E. C.; Banho, C. A.; Sacchetto, L.; Moraes, M. M.; Tommasini Grotto, R. M.; Souza-Neto, J. A.; Nogueira, M. L.; Fukumasu, H.; Coutinho, L. L.; Calado, R. T.; Neto, R. M.; Bispo de Filippis, A. M.; Venancio da Cunha, R.; Freitas, C.; Leonel Peterka, C. R.; Rangel Fernandes, C. F.; de Araújo, W. N.; do Carmo Said, R. F.; Almiron, M.; Campelo de Albuquerque, E. Melo C. F.; Lourenço, J.; de Oliveira, T.; Holmes, E. C.; Haddad, R.; Sampaio, S. C.; Elias, M. C.; Kashima, S.; de Alcantara, L. C. J.; Covas, D. T..
PubMed; 2022.
Preprint in English | PubMed | ID: ppcovidwho-332259

ABSTRACT

Brazil has experienced some of the highest numbers of COVID-19 cases and deaths globally and from May 2021 made Latin America a pandemic epicenter. Although SARS-CoV-2 established sustained transmission in Brazil early in the pandemic, important gaps remain in our understanding of virus transmission dynamics at the national scale. Here, we describe the genomic epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2 using near-full genomes sampled from 27 Brazilian states and a bordering country - Paraguay. We show that the early stage of the pandemic in Brazil was characterised by the co-circulation of multiple viral lineages, linked to multiple importations predominantly from Europe, and subsequently characterized by large local transmission clusters. As the epidemic progressed under an absence of effective restriction measures, there was a local emergence and onward international spread of Variants of Concern (VOC) and Variants Under Monitoring (VUM), including Gamma (P.1) and Zeta (P.2). In addition, we provide a preliminary genomic overview of the epidemic in Paraguay, showing evidence of importation from Brazil. These data reinforce the usefulness and need for the implementation of widespread genomic surveillance in South America as a toolkit for pandemic monitoring that provides a means to follow the real-time spread of emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants with possible implications for public health and immunization strategies.

4.
Archivos De Medicina ; 21(2):535-547, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1668007

ABSTRACT

Objective: to describe the sociodemographic, epidemiological and clinical characteristics of the initial cases of Covid-19 in the municipality of Sobral, Ceara, Brazil. Materials and methods: descriptive, temporal and quantitative epidemiological study, developed in the municipality of Sobral - Ceara, Brazil, with 110 confirmed cases of Covid-19. Descriptive and analytical analysis was performed, using the Chi-square test and Logistic Regression to verify the association between variables. The level of significance was set at 95% (p <= 0.05). Results: it was observed that 60% of cases occurred in women, 74.5% were adults between 20 and 59 years old, 15.5% health workers and the lethality rate was 1.8%. In 58.2% of cases the main reporting unit was the hospital, 10% required hospitalization, and 64.5% were diagnosed with rapid tes. The main symptoms manifested were: cough (58.2%), fever (57.3%), sore throat (36.4%) and difficulty breathing (31.9%). There was an association between age and the presence of fever, cough and sore throat (p=0.05). Conclusion: the results suggest that older people are more susceptible to some symptoms when compared to younger people. Associated with global estimates, this work can provide subsidies for Covid-19 prevention and control actions in small and medium-sized Brazilian municipalities.

5.
International Journal of Human Rights ; : 20, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1561535

ABSTRACT

How far can State and businesses 'play' with personal data, claiming to protect the right to health in pandemic times? This question leeds to the discussion of the possible damage caused by profiling and contact tracing techniques regarding personality rights in relations between ICT companies and States'. By analysing the way European and Inter-American bodies are tackling data protection rules currently in force, the text analyses the consent as a problematic issue, considering both the opt-in and opt-out model are not enough to protect those rights, especially in pandemic times. Although contact tracing might be used in favour of Public Health policies, it may also result in the violation of human rights. Applying the inductive method, this paper proposes a reflection about online behavioural tracking and profiling practices, explaining the efects of personal data mass gathering and the complex relations between businesses activities and human rights. The main conclusion is that all individuals have the same right to privacy, equality and freedom of choice. Thus, States should provide clear and objective rules to be followed by ICT companies, in accordance with international rules, ensuring individual's protection and holding data processors accountable for personal data processing.

6.
Humanidades & Inovacao ; 8(49):46-62, 2021.
Article in Portuguese | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1507302

ABSTRACT

Created in the 1950s from aerospace research, the Delphi method has been gaining diversity in its uses and models. The purpose of this article is to reflect on Delphi as a methodological alternative in the field of social sciences, analyzing its possibilities and challenges based on a research on collaborative consumption. The results showed depth in the identification of drivers and inhibitors of collaborative consumption in multiple dimensions (legal, business, technological and socio-cultural). The study concluded that the Delphi method proves to be current, innovative, and pertinent to contemporary social research due to its prospective capacity in complex contexts;lack of presence (mainly due to the increase in remote connections evidenced from the Covid-19 pandemic), collective and iterative construction of knowledge;reduction of hierarchies and participation of specialists. The challenges are the long research process and the choice of specialists (either due to homogeneity or the diversity between them).

7.
Public Health ; 198: 297-300, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347796

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Concerns about the increasing impact of severe COVID-19 in younger individuals in Brazil came after a recent synchronised country-wide wave of cases in Brazil. This communication analyses how hospitalisations due to COVID-19 changed in the age groups 18-49 years and ≥70 years. STUDY DESIGN: Longitudinal study based on secondary data. METHODS: Data from SIVEP-Gripe, a public and open-access database of Severe Acute Respiratory Illness records (including COVID-19 notifications), were used in this study. Statistical control charts examined changes in the magnitude and variation of younger (18-49 years) and older (≥70 years) adults who were hospitalised between 15th March 2020 and 19th June 2021. RESULTS: During the few first weeks of the pandemic in Brazil, the number of COVID-19 hospitalisations increased in older adults but decreased in younger adults. Subsequently, hospitalisations reached statistical control zones in epidemiological weeks (EW) 19-48 of 2020 (EW 19-48/2020) and EW 03-05/2021 (18-49 y, mean = 26.1%; ≥70 y, mean = 32.8%). Between EW 49/2020 and EW 02/2021, the number of hospitalisations of younger adults dropped to levels below the lower control limit. In contrast, the number of hospitalisations of older adults surpassed the upper limit of the corresponding statistical control zones. However, from EW 06/2021, numbers of hospitalisations changed from statistical control zones, with hospitalisations of younger adults increasing and reaching 44.9% in EW 24/2021 and hospitalisations of older adults decreasing until EW 19/2021 (14.1%) and reaching 17.3% in EW 24/2021. CONCLUSIONS: An increasing number of COVID-19 hospitalisations were observed in younger adults from EW 06/2021. This could be a result of the successful vaccination programme in older adults, who were initially prioritised, and possibly an increased exposure to highly transmissible variants of COVID-19 in younger adults who had to go to work in the absence of social protection (i.e. government financial support). Potential consequences of COVID-19 hospitalisations in younger adults could include a reduced life expectancy of the population and an increased number of people unable to perform daily activities due to post-COVID-19 conditions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Brazil/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
8.
Humanidades & Inovacao ; 8(41):79-88, 2021.
Article in Portuguese | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1337971

ABSTRACT

This paper discuss how the changes in school routine since the pandemic of COVID 19 have affected teachers mental health. Discuss the importance of preventive actions and promotion of the teacher's mental health, focusing on risk factors and their influences caused by the daily teaching, and the work overload that led to the psychological strain of the education teacher. basic. The method used to discuss the topic was qualitative, with questions regarding the employee's daily life. It is evident that teachers experience different forms of suffering when faced with unfavorable situations in their activities and develop coping strategies that alleviate suffering.

9.
Revista Cientifica Multidisciplinar RECIMA21 ; 2(5), 2021.
Article in Portuguese | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1319983

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has represented a global challenge to health systems, expanding at an increasing rate of deaths. Methods to control the spread of the disease such as social isolation and tracing of case contacts have been used around the world. With the emergence of COVID-19, it was necessary to expand applications and adopt Telehealth technologies.

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